It is worth noting, however, that the former AllStream ASN (formerly AT&T
Canada) AS15290 is a completely different thing, and has distinct
infrastructure and routing from the AboveNet ASN which is operated by Zayo.
Although they are probably using "Free" Zayo transport by now.

If I am grossly wrong and anybody from layer 3 network operations at Zayo
wants to chime in and tell us about the 40,000 ft view of their plans to
combine AS15290 and AS6461, I am sure the community would be very
interested.

On Tue, Aug 8, 2017 at 5:31 PM, Stephen Fulton <s...@lists.esoteric.ca> wrote:

> TR,
>
> MTS Allstream is no longer a combined entity.  MTS was purchased by Bell
> Canada and Allstream was purchased by Zayo.
>
> -- Stephen
>
>
> On 2017-08-08 8:19 PM, TR Shaw wrote:
>
>> Bill,
>>
>> What does Bell buying MTS do? Does it change your statement or will the
>> MTS portion of Bell still peer locally?
>>
>> Tom
>>
>> On Aug 8, 2017, at 8:10 PM, Bill Woodcock <wo...@pch.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> On Jul 20, 2017, at 7:01 AM, Hiers, David <david.hi...@cdk.com> wrote:
>>>> For traffic routing, is anyone constraining cross-border routing
>>>> between Canada and the US?  IOW, if you are routing from Toronto to
>>>> Montreal, do you have to guarantee that the path cannot go through, say,
>>>> Syracuse, New York?
>>>>
>>>
>>> No.  In fact, Bell Canada / Bell Aliant and Telus guarantee that you
>>> _will_ go through Chicago, Seattle, New York, or Ashburn, since none of
>>> them peer anywhere in Canada at all.
>>>
>>> Last I checked (November of last year) the best-connected commercial
>>> networks (i.e. not CANARIE) in Canada were Hurricane Electric, MTS
>>> Allstream, Primus, and Zip Telecom, all of which peer at three or more
>>> Canadian IXes.  So, they’re capable of keeping traffic in Canada so long as
>>> the other end isn’t on Bell or Telus, which only sell U.S. bandwidth to
>>> Canadians.
>>>
>>> In November, only 27% of intra-Canadian routes stayed within Canada; 64%
>>> went through the U.S.  That’s way worse than five years ago, when 60%
>>> stayed within Canada, and 38% went through the U.S.
>>>
>>> As has been pointed out, Canada has been building IXPs…  Just not as
>>> fast as the rest of the world has.  They’re behind the global average
>>> growth rate, and behind the U.S. growth rate, which is why the problem is
>>> getting worse.  Bandwidth costs are falling faster elsewhere, so they’re
>>> importing more foreign bandwidth.
>>>
>>>                                 -Bill
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>

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