Re: [backstage] Freeview HD Content Management

2010-06-15 Thread Rob Myers

On 06/15/2010 03:21 PM, Andrew Bowden wrote:


We can argue around this one as much as we want but I'm afraid there's one 
simple truth.  Most people don't care one bit and just want to watch their 
programme.


They do. And they won't take long to work out that technology, content 
and services are cheaper and more convenient where the BBC hasn't 
betrayed their interests.


- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Freeview HD Content Management

2010-06-15 Thread Rob Myers

On 06/15/2010 02:08 PM, Andrew Bowden wrote:


If the alternative was this system did not exist and rights holders told
broadcasters (for this is not just a BBC issue) that the broadcaster
could not broadcast their content in HD on the Freeview platform...


They threatened something like this before and were rightly ignored.

The result was...nothing happened.


...how would you explain to the average punter that the programme could
not be broadcast on Freeview HD?  And how would you justify it to them
in such a way that they went Yes, you're right rather than Eh?


See Virgin vs. Sky.

Or:

These guys want to make it more expensive and less convenient for you 
to just watch TV and they're trying to use the national institution of 
the BBC to do so. We're fighting this rather than selling you out to 
make life easier for us when we join them after leaving the BBC^D^D^D.


- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Freeview HD Content Management

2010-06-15 Thread Rob Myers

On 06/15/2010 10:11 PM, Nick Reynolds-FMT wrote:

People won't miss something
they never knew they had in the first place especially if they are able
to do all the things they can now, which it appears they will be.


They'll find out soon enough, they're not, and it doesn't.

This is a problem.

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] indefinitely live BBC archive?

2010-03-01 Thread Rob Myers
On 01/03/10 10:09, Paul Rissen wrote:
 Rights are important, and should be respected - but shouldn't be used as a
 weapon to scare off questions/solutions...
   
And we've known that we need to tackle rights on new work (the rats nest
of pre-digital rights would probably require legislation to untangle)
for some years now.

But it's difficult to persuade the people we need to persuade of this.
Their lawyers tend to try and talk them out of it at the last moment in
my experience and succeed far too often.

- Rob.

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Re: [backstage] indefinitely live BBC archive?

2010-03-01 Thread Rob Myers
On 01/03/10 11:22, Ian Forrester wrote:
 Your right about the lawyers. As default they suggest you would be a mug to 
 give away any part of the rights.
   
In my experience there are very, very few lawyers who can help work
through more creative models. I've even been surprised by some of the
lawyers working for organizatons/projects who should know better.
Protecting against the risk of loss is deeply ingrained, opening up to
opportunities for gain is an alien way of thinking.

 I know I'm slightly bias but can I suggest http://free-culture.cc/ the book 
 to anyone interested in how complex rights can get.
   
I'd also recommend Promises To Keep, which Lessig refers to in that
book. It's a very detailed illustration of the precise flow of rights
and values in the (US) music industry. This is what any new system would
replace.

 When started RDTV, we took the stance of not using anything BBC pretty much, 
 just in case there might be a contract or licence which held us from 
 releasing the footage. Its like tip toeing in a live minefield.
   
My mother wanted a DVD of The Rock and Roll Years for her birthday
recently and I had to explain why it was incredibly unlikely that one
would be available...
 I do wish we were more enlightened about remix/free culture but the fact 
 remains to most of the rights holders that all this is hippy nonsense unless 
 its proven that they can make more revenue from giving away part of the 
 rights.
   
I've worked on several projects devoted to doing just that. It's a
struggle but we're learning more and more about both how to structure
the project and how to keep all the stakeholders on board when their
lawyers panic the day before the launch. ;-)

- Rob.

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Re: [backstage] iPad

2010-01-28 Thread Rob Myers
On 28/01/10 08:03, Brian Butterworth wrote:
 Underwhelming.  It's a big iPhone. It's named after the Star Trek PADD.
 Might be good it if ran an operating system and had a keyboard.
   
As Mo points out it does. It can run iPhone apps so if it's not running
the iPhone OS it's running another OSX variant. It has an on-screen
keyboard and you can plug in a physical keyboard (they even provide a
dock so you can configure it as a desktop system while doing so).

But it also has DRM...

http://www.defectivebydesign.org/ipad

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/01/27/defective_by_design/

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] iPad

2010-01-28 Thread Rob Myers
On 28/01/10 09:56, Brian Butterworth wrote:
 Sorry, I didn't realise we were back in the 1970s where the software that
 runs on the iPhone can be called an operating system.
   
It's a UNIX. It's a UNIX broken to remove your freedom, but it's still a
multi-tasking* memory-protected kernel-based operating system.

 And it clearly doesn't have a keyboard.
   
It's not a piano... ;-)

- Rob.

* - Unless you're an application author or a user. See the broken part.

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Re: [backstage] Freeview HD Content Management

2010-01-22 Thread Rob Myers
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2010/01/freeview_hd_content_manag
 ement.html

Overall, we believe the proposed system takes a highly pragmatic approach
to content management

Why do people always use pragmatic as a synonym for complicit?

Indeed, the proposed Freeview HD content management approach is so
'light-touch' that some have argued that it is not worth having.

So don't have it then. Problem solved

I just hope that these communities can understand our position too; that
we want to deliver the service which enables more viewers across the UK to
enjoy high definition content as soon as possible.

That isn't the BBC's position. The BBC's position is that they are going
to ignore both history and public opinion and keep pushing for DRM until
they get it.

Holding a new service hostage is a convenient way of achieving this.

- Rob.


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Re: [backstage] Defining Non-Commercial

2010-01-22 Thread Rob Myers
On Fri, 22 Jan 2010 16:33:18 +, Mo McRoberts m...@nevali.net wrote:

 Exactly the same problem exists with Creative Commons NC licenses -
 there isn't a solid definition of what non-commercial actually
 means. The CC actually ran a consultation on it, and were going to
 do... something, at some point. As far as I know, nothing's happened
 yet (beyond noting that if you think there's a possibility your usage
 might be considered 'commercial', you're best off just asking the
 licensor whether what they think of your proposed use, which does
 somewhat defeat the purpose of standardised licenses).

CC have run a consultation on this -

http://creativecommons.org/weblog/entry/17127

- Rob.

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Re: [backstage] Websites to get Panic Buttons

2009-12-07 Thread Rob Myers
On 07/12/09 17:54, Graeme Mulvaney wrote:
 Why should facebook need a panic button for children ? 

It's a *moral panic* button.

It will be a very handy tool for cyberbullies to use against their victims.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Encryption of HD by the BBC - cont ...

2009-10-06 Thread Rob Myers
DRM is law, not code.

(As code it's useless, an encryption system where you give the attacker the
key...)

- rob.

On Oct 6, 2009 4:14 PM, Sean DALY sdaly...@gmail.com wrote:

Actually, lots of FLOSS code produces supersecure encryption; GnuPG for
example.

Digital Restrictions Management of broadcast media is harder to do
than text messages or filesystem volumes.

Most commercial DRM developers don't give a hoot about GNU/Linux
platforms since marketshare is so small though.

Sean


On Tue, Oct 6, 2009 at 4:36 PM, Scot McSweeney-Roberts

bbc_backst...@mcsweeney-roberts.co.uk wrote:  

 On Tue, Oct 6, 2009 at 15:00, Sean DALY sdaly...@gmail.com wrote:  
David, I'm curious, what...

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Re: [backstage] Encryption of HD by the BBC - cont ...

2009-10-06 Thread Rob Myers
On 06/10/09 19:07, David Tomlinson wrote:
 Frank Wales wrote:

 Do you mean the DMCA?  Isn't that American?  And what is a unilaterally
 imposed licence, when it's at home?  How can someone force me to accept
 their permission to do something?

 I can not remember the relevant European legislation, IPRED, IPRES2?

The EUCD. Which covers Technological Measures.

And DRM does precisely force you to accept someone's (ability to grant
you) permission to do something. That's its intended goal.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Encryption of HD by the BBC - cont ...

2009-10-06 Thread Rob Myers
On 06/10/09 20:05, Brian Butterworth wrote:
 And let's not forget that EU Legislation has to be enacted by the
 UK Parliament.

Copyright and Related Rights Regulations 2003 -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_and_Related_Rights_Regulations_2003#Technical_measures

And while I'm at it -

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si1997/19973032.htm

;-)

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] The BBC is encrypting its HD signal by the back door

2009-10-03 Thread Rob Myers
 On Fri, Oct 2, 2009 at 19:53, Nick Reynolds-FMT 
 nick.reyno...@bbc.co.ukwrote:
 
 How would the cause of audiences be served if the BBC refused to deal
 with content vendors and as a result audiences could not access that
 content?

History shows that this won't happen.

And this time the BBC is in an even stronger position given the collapse
of advertising revenue for commercial TV in the UK.

The BBC is a nice big pot of easy money for content vendors. The threats
of content vendors not to take that money shouldn't fool anyone with two
brain cells to rub together.

Next they'll be threatening to hold their breath until they get what
they want.

 As usual it's a difficult balancing act.

It is not. It's capitulation to special interests for no good reason.

If it was a balancing act, how would just giving the side that is
against the BBC and its audience everything they want balance things?

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] The BBC is encrypting its HD signal by the back door

2009-10-02 Thread Rob Myers
On 02/10/09 19:17, Nick Reynolds-FMT wrote:
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2009/10/freeview_hd_copy_protecti
 on_a.html

However our focus is not to champion causes - it's meeting our public
service remit which means serving our many audiences as best, as fairly,
and as openly as we can.

Championing the cause of content vendors against those audiences is out
of focus by that description.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] The BBC is encrypting its HD signal by the back door

2009-10-02 Thread Rob Myers
On 02/10/09 19:17, Nick Reynolds-FMT wrote:
 
 People on this list may be interested in this latest blog post:
 
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2009/10/freeview_hd_copy_protecti
 on_a.html 

The first commenter is far more worth reading than the original post -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2009/10/freeview_hd_copy_protection_a.html?ssorl=1254509384ssoc=rd

For example -

“With access to its technology, consumers will be able to share high
definition content across home networks.”

This isn’t something which DRM _enables_. It’s something that DRM
_permits_ in a limited fashion. Re-stating this ad nauseum doesn’t make
the reverse magically true.

“We have consulted a wide range of stakeholders”

Who? When? The BBC only made mention of it here -after- the Ofcom
non-consultation got widespread coverage—that in itself was a miracle,
as Ofcom didn’t actually publish it AS a consultation, merely a “letter
of enquiry” with a minimal window for responses. If there’s a
consultation still to come, when will it be? Please don’t forget that
the license-fee paying public ARE stakeholders here. If discussions have
been ongoing for months, why is it only now being made public?

Moreover, if introducing this is critical to the launch schedule of
Freeview HD services, why is it only being discussed now (at what can
only charitably be called the eleventh hour)?

Have rights-holders been told they can expect it to be in place in time
for launch, despite it being contingent upon Ofcom’s (and presumably,
the Trust’s) approval?

If not, then what do the contracts for BBC HD on Freesat say? (broad
terms, we don’t need to breach “commercial confidentiality”)

Alternatively, is it the case that the content licensing agreements for
BBC HD currently ONLY cover Freesat, despite everybody knowing perfectly
well when Freesat was launched that Freeview HD was due to launch late
2009/early 2010?

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] The BBC is encrypting its HD signal by the back door

2009-09-30 Thread Rob Myers
On 30/09/09 17:37, Kieran Kunhya wrote:
 
 If anything the open source community will be the first to find a workaround. 

It will be both impractical and illegal to do so. From the article -

DTLA requires that all devices be made to resist end-user
modification. That is, DTLA devices can't use open-source software,
lest the pesky licence-fee payer alter the restrictions in the code.

And the novel feature of the proposed system is that it is a way of
abusing the database right to exclude free software developers in the
absence of software patents.

The important point isn't the technical details, though -

These rightsholder groups have a long history of trying to arm-twist
the BBC into imposing restrictions on the TV that you and I are obliged
to pay for. For years, the BBC broadcast its satellite feed in encrypted
form, paying an additional £20m a year to run this scheme. When the BBC
decided that it was unseemly and wasteful to go on paying for encrypted
satellite signals, the major studios promised a boycott of the
corporation. The boycott was short-lived: as soon as the quarterly
results came in with a massive BBC-shaped hole in the studios' income,
they recanted.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Taking advantage of the Publicity clause

2009-07-28 Thread Rob Myers
It's a great idea, but beware the opinions of unions stung in the past by
attempted exploits on the publicity clause.

The materials would have to be by-sa to be used in wikipedia (which is
good). Charging for the service would therefore guarantee only timeliness,
not exclusivity.

On Jul 28, 2009 11:14 AM, Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk wrote:

http://ideas.welcomebackstage.com/ideatorrent/ideas_in_preparation/

Interesting idea came through the ideas system, not sure if its true or not.
What do you guys think?

Cheers,

Ian Forrester

This e-mail is: []secret; []private; [x]public

Senior Producer, BBC Backstage, BBC RD
Room 1044, BBC Manchester BH, Oxford Road, M60 1SJ
email: ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk
work: +44 (0)1612444063 | mob: +44 (0)7711913293

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Re: [backstage] Ogg Theora/Vorbis and HTML5

2009-06-18 Thread Rob Myers
2009/6/18 Phil Lewis backst...@linuxcentre.net


 The same rights holders probably didn't like VCRs either - or digital
 terrestrial tv broadcasting.


They didn't. They also didn't like cable TV, MP3 and just about any other
cash cow you can mention. You have to force them to get rich each time. It's
really quite embarrassing.

- Rob.


Re: [backstage] The Final Digital Britain report

2009-06-17 Thread Rob Myers
On Tue, Jun 16, 2009 at 7:40 PM, Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com wrote:

 2009/6/16 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk:
  The Final Digital Britain Report
 http://www.culture.gov.uk/what_we_do/broadcasting/6216.aspx
  So what do people think? Time to leave the country or dig a hole and
 stick our heads into it?

 Maybe just time to get a https://www.relakks.com/?lang=engcid=gb
 account,


Not sure about relakks -

http://digg.com/security/Is_Relakks_Piratpartiet_s_anonymizer_really_anonymous

and possibly switch to a smaller ISP if your current one
 messes with your quality of service too much.


Can anyone recommend an alternative to Virmin in Peterborough?

- Rob.


Re: [backstage] The Final Digital Britain report

2009-06-17 Thread Rob Myers
2009/6/17 Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk

 I got to say I'm also with ukfsn.org and not really had any major problems


Thanks guys.

I'll take a look.

- Rob.


Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-30 Thread Rob Myers
European Newspapers Find Creative Ways to Thrive in the Internet Age

PARIS — As the death toll in the American newspaper industry mounted
this month, the German publisher Axel Springer, which owns Bild, the
biggest newspaper in Europe, reported the highest profit in its
62-year history.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/30/business/media/30paper.html?_r=1

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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-29 Thread Rob Myers
Dave Crossland wrote:
 2009/3/29 James Ockenden james.ocken...@gmail.com:
 I think this is a false dilemma. Guys in my office have phones with
 8MP cameras. My 18-month old phone has a 5MP camera. I suspect a good
 lens and skill with photoshop is vastly more important than the
 photographer being professional.
 Sure, some kid with a 10MP phone can take a 300dpi front-page-sized
 picture of a UFO crashing down into the village green – but when the
 alien crawls out and asks to speak to Gordon Brown for the first time,
 do you, as a news editor, send the kid with the phone, or perhaps
 someone who has a bagfull of experience, a ladder, good elbows, and a
 record of never ever fg up?
 
 This also seems like a false dilemma, 

Or a good example of a scarcity that can be exploited economically.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-29 Thread Rob Myers
Fearghas McKay wrote:
 
 On 29 Mar 2009, at 19:48, Dave Crossland wrote:
 
 Photography did in portrait painters. Same story, different century.
 
 It did ?
 
 There really are no portrait painters left?
 
 I think the effect of photography was that portraiture as a market
 increased, the affluent could still ( and did ) get a painter but the
 masses could either take their own or get a professional in who only
 needed 10 mins in the shopping centre temporary studio.

Yes the history of publication in the livejournal era is a good parallel
to the history of portraiture in the box brownie era.

What is true in the case of both portraiture and publishing is that the
barriers to entry were greatly lowered. The market *expands* rather than
being wiped out. What is destroyed is the *exclusivity* of the
profession, not the value of the professionals.

I think that professional investigative journalism and professional news
photography will continue to command a premium because they represent
scarce, valuable, differentiating skills. If I want to really have
something exponentially different to wrap adverts around I want Edison
Carter or Magnum, not some random happy slapper. ;-)

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] [Fwd: [ORG-discuss] iPlayer on Gnash Later In The Year]

2009-03-25 Thread Rob Myers
On Wed, Mar 25, 2009 at 10:19 AM, Tim Dobson li...@tdobson.net wrote:
 Seeing is believing but this sounds very encouraging...
 I do wonder if more could be done to help them though.

Large quantities of cash would be good. ;-)

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-17 Thread Rob Myers
On Tue, Mar 17, 2009 at 10:09 AM, Sean DALY sdaly...@gmail.com wrote:
 A key characteristic of a newspaper is that you can fold it up.
 Foldable or rollable screens may yet arrive in the next few years, I
 vaguely recall Samsung and Sony showing proof-of-concept and
 prototypes the last year.

If I get my fish  chips wrapped in a Kindle I will be really annoyed. ;-)

 I like e-reading on the OLPC XO-1 which is small, light, and
 ruggedized (it's for kids), twists and folds flat screen out, and in
 direct sunlight switches to very high resolution black and white (you
 have to read on it outside to believe it). Navigation is by the
 joystick buttons although it does take a little getting used to. I own
 an EeePC and an Aspire One and they are clunky in comparison (I don't
 even consider classic laptops).

I'd gladly buy one as an ebook reader to help get those economics of
scale working for OLPC, but...

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-16 Thread Rob Myers
On Mon, Mar 16, 2009 at 2:41 PM, Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com wrote:

 My hope with the change is that we'll get an answer to the questions
 MediaLens raise about the integrity of the profession.

My hope is that with the change MediaLens will find something better to do. ;-P

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Clay Shirky: Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable

2009-03-15 Thread Rob Myers
Kevin Charman-Anderson wrote:

 But Dave, taking a swing from the barricades at the profiteering
 publishers sounds lovely but it comes close to ignoring the pain and
 economic dislocation that journalists are going through at the moment.
 We're not the only ones hurting in this recession, but reporters are
 going to have difficulty replacing their income in this recession from
 their previously full-time jobs with a totally digital model that is
 still in the making. 

Stockholm syndrome for the people who didn't pay journalists on time or
for the submitted word count under the old model won't help with these
facts.

If we have to live in capitalist society then we have to listen to the
market. And the market says that some writers can make a living from a
dedicated readership, advertising, sponsorship, merchandise and
subscriptions.

Pretty much the same as for the newspapers that town criers and local
gossips couldn't compete with...

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] BBC becomes the British Botnet Corporation

2009-03-13 Thread Rob Myers
On Fri, Mar 13, 2009 at 8:35 AM, Steve Jolly st...@jollys.org wrote:

 Not sure I'm convinced - all operating systems have their vulnerabilities;

All machines have their *theoretical* vulnerabilities. Only Windows
has vast botnets built on them, or any effective malware threats
exploiting them in the wild.

Unless you are a BBC reporter who has only ever used Windows, you're
on a deadline, and you don't want your report to look like it lacks
balance. In which case suddenly every OS is as good as Windows for a
change. ;-)

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] BBC becomes the British Botnet Corporation

2009-03-13 Thread Rob Myers
On Fri, Mar 13, 2009 at 10:01 AM, Peter Bowyer pe...@bowyer.org wrote:
 2009/3/13 Rob Myers r...@robmyers.org:
 On Fri, Mar 13, 2009 at 8:35 AM, Steve Jolly st...@jollys.org wrote:

 Not sure I'm convinced - all operating systems have their vulnerabilities;

 All machines have their *theoretical* vulnerabilities. Only Windows
 has vast botnets built on them, or any effective malware threats
 exploiting them in the wild.

 And a great way to change that is to allow users of other OSs to
 believe and act as if they're not vulnerable.

If forewarned is forearmed, this applies to knowing which platform is
the greater theoretical and practical security risk.

It does not justify hiding that information with a false equivalency

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] BBC becomes the British Botnet Corporation

2009-03-13 Thread Rob Myers
On Fri, Mar 13, 2009 at 10:56 AM, Gordon McMullan
gordon.mcmul...@bbc.co.uk wrote:

 It may not be *vast* but here's a report of a Mac OS X Trojan enrolling a
 Mac into a DDoS attack http://notahat.com/posts/28 it seems that he was
 originally infected by running a compromised installer infected with the
 OSX.iWorkServices.A trojan see:
 http://www.sophos.com/security/analyses/viruses-and-spyware/osxiworksa.html

Thanks. I must confess I was ignorant of that. :-(

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Slightly bias view maybe?

2009-02-23 Thread Rob Myers
Dave Crossland wrote:

 Some of them have no pensions and need this money, he said.

A large enough cut of zero must be worth *something*.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Slightly bias view maybe?

2009-02-23 Thread Rob Myers
 In fact technically changing all copyright durations to be 1 year
 would also harmonise everything.=20

Berne means copyrights have to be at least 50 years.

 There is no logical reason why you
 can only harmonise upwards and not downwards.

Governments don't want to strip people of their property, however
worthless it may be.

I agree with you in principle though.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Make the primary OS used in state schools FOSS

2009-02-10 Thread Rob Myers
On Tue, Feb 10, 2009 at 9:13 AM, Alun Rowe alun.r...@pentangle.co.uk wrote:

 //personal rant coming up...

 For any open source software (Linux for example) to really work on the
 network en mass we need to about user experience.  Currently I've yet to see
 an attractive/user friendly piece of FOSS.

Anecdotally, I find that Inkscape is much better usability wise than
Illustrator, and that Firefox is much less awful than IE's menu bar
idiocy.

The free desktop experience has become more unified as the Mac one has
become more fragmented.

 Whilst the software (once you've
 worked out how to use it) is extremely effective IMO user experience is a
 big part of the software which usually gets overlooked in FOSS scenarios. I
 think FOSS can have a huge future but the community need to think about user
 experience then it will be taken more seriously.

Be careful what you wish for: the current KDE 4 train wreck came from
the developers focussing on user experience. It's an interface so
godawful that everyone I have seen use it has been personally offended
by it. ;-)

The desktop user experience with Free Software is getting much better.
For me personally it's become a non issue over the last two years
(before then I might have agreed with you more).

But for many people, usability equals familiarity; making it work as
badly as Windows. ;-)

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Make the primary operating system used in state schools free and open source

2009-02-09 Thread Rob Myers
On Mon, Feb 9, 2009 at 4:12 PM, Christopher Woods chris...@infinitus.co.uk

 Transforming a Windows school to an Ubuntu school is nigh on impossible to
 achieve unless you provide a year's warning, gradually phase out use of all
 Windows-only software over the course of the year, implement the massive
 overhaul and platform transition during the holidays and then spend the next
 six months to a year supporting users when stuff goes wrong. Most schools
 simply cannot afford to provision those kinds of resources, so they stay put
 with what they have, and that's why FOSS will never make significant inroads
 into those establishments. It would take something like Governmental
 intervention to impose FOSS and OSes on schools as a mandatory element of
 their funding in order for them to make the change, but it would be so
 disruptive that it would probably be ignored or sidelined by many schools.

And yet they will end up on a newer Microsoft operating system at some
point. ;-)

 I am not trying to scaremonger or FUD here, it is just my view as someone
 who has gone through the system and grown up alongside the maturation of a
 typical educational IT setup, and who also had the advantage of talking to
 the person who helped to implement a lot of it (and still talks to the
 person who now helps implement policy and infrastructure for an entire
 county's worth of education!) Although perhaps flawed or coloured, I feel
 it's a pragmatic, realistic view.

It's very informative. Thanks. I've encountered similar stories from
people working with charities for example.

One thing I'd say is that nothing will stimulate companies that can
support schools (and other institutions) using GNU/Linux like the
prospect of there being a sudden increase in the number of schools
using GNU/Linux to support. ;-)

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Twittering on

2009-02-09 Thread Rob Myers
Frank Wales wrote:
 Apparently, there are complaints about how much air time
 twitter is being given by the BBC:
   
 http://thenextweb.com/2009/02/09/bbc-radio-listeners-kick-fuss-twitter-time-bbc-create-microblogging-service/

Yeah, all the cool kids are on identi.ca now. ;-)

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Twittering on

2009-02-09 Thread Rob Myers
Ian Forrester wrote:
 The really cool kids are on both right? 

I refer the honourable gentleman to the smiley I appended at the
conclusion of my previous statement. ;-) I think Twitter has the more
famous people on it.

 Surely it's the same as when Radio presenters couldn't help but chat about 
 there Myspace pages all the time? Every bar I go into now a days, there's 
 talk about Youtube, Facebook and sometimes Twitter anyway. 

Twitter is breaking through to the mainstream. It's a big enough
phenomenon that ignoring it would be the extraordinary thing.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Make the primary operating system used in state schools free and open source

2009-02-09 Thread Rob Myers
  Who cares if
 MS is de facto in the school setting if it serves its purpose?=20

Its purpose (as someone else pointed out quite eloquently) is to teach
kids. I don't know how well MS software teaches anything other than how
to use the previous version of MS software, a skill that at best
devalued by the time you get into the workplace.

 Even if on
 the face of it FOSS could replace it, all that existing knowledge is go=
ne
 because people have to relearn how to work the computers to a standard =
they
 were at before.=20

For the average computer user this is their experience of upgrades to
new versions of MS software.

There is a bogus upgrade bait and switch cycle that keeps people
upgrading their intel hardware, MS OS, and MS software to prevent them
losing their investment in each when the next one is declared outmoded
by the company that sells it. GNU/Linux can break the OS part of this
cycle, and Dave has mentioned WINE.

 A phased migration is the only workable solution, and even
 that becomes harder and harder when you have outsourced service and sup=
port
 from third parties as Neil mentioned.

These third parties must remain competitive if they wish to continue to
receive tax money. I allege that the advantages of switching to Free
Software *can* outweigh the costs (sic) of support, teaching, and third
party staff upgrading their skills to more open, flexible and studiable
systems. ;-)

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Twittering on

2009-02-09 Thread Rob Myers
Duncan Barclay wrote:
 I have to admit that I generally don't see the point of twitter. 

You could have fitted that into a twitter message and reached a much
wider audience. ;-)

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Make the primary operating system used in state schools free and open source

2009-02-09 Thread Rob Myers
Richard Lockwood wrote:
 I allege that the advantages of switching to Free
 Software *can* outweigh the costs (sic) of support, teaching, and third
 party staff upgrading their skills to more open, flexible and studiable
 systems. ;-)
 
 I like the use of the word allege.  Can you demonstrate it?

Sure. Give me control of the state budget for school IT... ;-)

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Nice CC-ND-ish DVD

2009-02-02 Thread Rob Myers
Dave Crossland wrote:
 2009/2/2 Frank Wales fr...@limov.com:
 Dave Crossland wrote:
 A nice example of someone running a business, with streaming and
 torrent downloads and verbatim commercial redistribution permitted:

 http://www.chrismartenson.com/make-your-own-crash-course-dvds
 Er, you sure?
 
 Quite sure.
 
 http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.chrismartenson.com%2Fmake-your-own-crash-course-dvds

I can see it. But it's ND so... ;-P

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-21 Thread Rob Myers
On Wed, Jan 21, 2009 at 3:27 PM, Michael Walsh
michael.wa...@digitalrightsmanifesto.com wrote:
 If you have digital material you can release for remixing purpose - then I
 would contend that along with distributing it via some channel or another,
 you should also consider hosting the content on a BBC server and make tools
 available which would (1) allow people to remix online and (2) facilitate
 them in publishing this new content to any other platform(s).
 In effect this would allow the BBC to be a Online Public Service Developer,
 Producer and Publisher/Broadcaster.

And ensuring that the results can be used by commercial organizations
(by not making it NC) would help defuse any competition concerns.

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-21 Thread Rob Myers
On Wed, Jan 21, 2009 at 4:34 PM, Dave Crossland d...@lab6.com wrote:
 2009/1/21 Rob Myers r...@robmyers.org:

 And ensuring that the results can be used by commercial organizations
 (by not making it NC) would help defuse any competition concerns.

 And boost Wikipedia et al :-)

Yes, and then Wikipedia and Flickr etc. can provide exposure for the
BBC content and blahblahblah network effects blahblahblah leverage
blahblahblah.

 http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Licensing_update

Ugh. Dual licencing. ;-)

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] If you had a ton of content to freely distribute

2009-01-20 Thread Rob Myers
On Tue, Jan 20, 2009 at 4:21 PM, Ian Forrester ian.forres...@bbc.co.uk wrote:

 Licensing,

 I think we'll use something like CC-BY-NC (although I totally understand the 
 arguments against NC, Dave) CC-BY-NC-SA is tempting due to the nature of the 
 content.

Could you explain the nature of the content and why NC is tempting for it?

BY(-SA) includes non-endorsement now, like the Creative Archive
licence, and explicitly asserts the moral rights of paternity and
integrity. SA can be a sufficient disincentive to economic
exploitation of work. So depending on what the concerns are these may
be addressable without resorting to NC.

 I do wonder how we keep the licence in tack even when the assets are broken 
 up and reused? Maybe we should be looking into watermarking or some adobe xmp 
 type system? This would also be useful for figuring out reach.

Yes use XMP. CC have done a lot of work on metadata and have tools for
working with it.

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] The Apple Wheel: Apple's new keyboard-free laptop

2009-01-06 Thread Rob Myers
On Tue, Jan 6, 2009 at 1:39 PM, Gavin Johnson gavin.john...@bbc.co.uk wrote:
 Should you decide to get one it's gonna be a while before you say anything.

 On 06/01/2009 13:22, Brian Butterworth briant...@freeview.tv wrote:

 http://ping.fm/GqIbk http://ping.fm/GqIbk

 What can I say?

t

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Re: [backstage] iPlayer caching

2008-12-18 Thread Rob Myers
Andy wrote:

 To say AIR supports Linux is very misleading. 

AIR undermines GNU/Linux, it doesn't support it. ;-) [also ducks]

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] Microsoft says it 'has always preferred' DRM-free content

2008-11-23 Thread Rob Myers
Aleem B wrote:

 (why is it so surpising that microsoft would prefer
 DRM-free content).

Their prior actions, corporate culture, general technological
strategies, partnerships and regulatory environment.

And you have stripped the emphasis of the original. There is no evidence
that MS *have always* preferred drm-free content. Quite the opposite in
fact. For any Microsoftie to now claim that the corporation has always
preferred drm-free content is at best wishful thinking on their part.

When followed of promises of yet more DRM, that isn't alarming, it's
risible.

- Rob.



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Re: [backstage] BNP mashups

2008-11-20 Thread Rob Myers
On Thu, Nov 20, 2008 at 7:48 AM, Richard Lockwood
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 Certainly.  Dave is forever banging on about how if information can be
 copied it *should* be copied and shared - not just free software, but
 anything; music, films etc, regardless of the wishes of the original
 creator of that information - all in the name of freedom and
 friendship.  So I find it ironic that he's so pleased that the
 Google mashup using BNP data has been taken down.  I'm intrigued to
 know what he believes is more important - his beloved freedom, or
 personal privacy (especially as that information is now in the public
 domain).

That confuses means with ends. What you do with information isn't
excused by the fact that you are using information in doing it.

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] BNP mashups

2008-11-20 Thread Rob Myers
On Thu, Nov 20, 2008 at 9:52 AM, Richard Lockwood
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I don't see any confusion at all.  It's simply a question of where
 does Dave draw the line between you must share and copy this and
 you must not share and copy this.  He's previously given the very
 strong impression that there was no line, and you must share and copy
 everything.

I don't think that's practical. None of us has the time to copy
absolutely everything. And even if we did, the fact that we did copy
everything would have no impact on the ethics of what we *do* with it.

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] [ORG-discuss] DRM Free BBC Content on GNU/Linux (Ubuntu)

2008-10-30 Thread Rob Myers
On Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 6:53 AM, Vladimir Harman [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 hmmm...nice and positive news for the ubuntu friends, and me of course :) 
 thanks to canonical for spreading the word :) the plugin works with totem 
 only, or it works with other gnu/linux video applications?

My next action was going to be to ask backstage if anyone can provide
more information on this project. :-)

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] [ORG-discuss] DRM Free BBC Content on GNU/Linux (Ubuntu)

2008-10-30 Thread Rob Myers
-BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-
Hash: SHA1

Ian Forrester wrote:
 I'm trying to get the guys behind this to do a full piece on backstage about 
 it. 
 

That would be brilliant!

- - Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Brandon on Redux on BBC Internet Blog

2008-10-27 Thread Rob Myers
 http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/bbcinternet/2008/10/history_of_the_bbc_redux_
 proje.html

In the summer of 2007, freetards (me too), the OSC and others were
calling for the BBC to make iPlayer cross-platform
...
Cross-platform support has always been a source of grief

The BBC's insistence that this is the problem rather than their use of
licence-fee-payers money to lock people in to proprietary standards
and exclude free platforms is getting more and more shrill.

Breaking your public's devices one platform at a time really is not an
achievement, no matter how interesting a technical problem it is for
the Beeb's geeks or how strong their new leader's RDF is.

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Re: [backstage] BBC DRM iplayer mobiles etc

2008-10-15 Thread Rob Myers
-BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-
Hash: SHA1

Phil Wilson wrote:

 Yes, the fact that this will run on all the Linux PCs in both my houseand 
 office is a shockingly pro-Microsoft move and must be stopped!

My Linux box is PowerPC. But it is a great comfort to know that you
can run it.

- - Rob.
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=7i8y
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Re: [backstage] Questions so for FOWA so far...

2008-10-01 Thread Rob Myers
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Ian Forrester wrote:

 Facebook
 ---

1. Given that your business is worth nothing without the trust of your
community, why have you just hired someone who worked for the former US
Attorney General who approved warrantless wiretapping, torture, helping
to blow a CIA agent's cover and firing non-political appointees for
political reasons as your general counsel?

2. No really, why?

- - Rob.
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Re: [backstage] Internet TV without streaming is like

2008-07-18 Thread Rob Myers
Dave Crossland wrote:
 2008/7/18 Oeztunali, Sebnem (CT) [EMAIL PROTECTED]:
 ...It will also let users buy a TV show or movie without actually 
 downloading the video file to the PC's hard drive...
 
 This statement is either misguided or lying. :-)

Why should it be either? It's possible to buy something without having
to take physical possession of it.

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] BBC E-mail: It's not the Gates, it's the bars

2008-07-04 Thread Rob Myers
On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 12:24 PM, Gareth Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

 Anyone else find it strange that Richard Stallman feels it is apparently
 unjust for Microsoft and others to publish software that users are not
 free to share and modify, but it is ok to publish an article which
 readers are not free to share and modify?


If he's using his standard licence then you are free to copy it verbatim and
share it.

Stallman believes that works of opinion are different from pieces of
software. He is concerned that arbitrary modifications of a work of opinion
could lead to misrepresentation, and he's not alone in that. Software
doesn't really have that problem, so he's right that they are different.

I don't agree with his conclusions on this particular issue, I'm just trying
to explain that his position is coherent.

- Rob.


Re: [backstage] BBC E-mail: It's not the Gates, it's the bars

2008-07-04 Thread Rob Myers
On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 1:20 PM, Gareth Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 It uses CC-ND which only allows sharing with attribution, it does not
 allow commercial reuse or you to 'alter, transform or build upon this
 work'


ND does allow commercial use. NC-ND would prevent commercial use.

He doesn't mention BY or the version. He should. Only the old 1.0 CC
licences had a standalone ND.

ND is equivalent to the old one-line verbatim distribution licence he used
to use, and his reasons for doing so have to do with the difference between
source code and works of opinion.

- Rob.


Re: [backstage] BBC E-mail: It's not the Gates, it's the bars

2008-07-04 Thread Rob Myers
The ND licence is restrictive compared to copyleft but it is less
restrictive than normal copyright, because it allows commercial copying of
the work.

That said I do see where you're coming from, and I personally would much
rather Stallman just copylefted his writings. BY-SA and moral rights should
prevent misattribution of derivatives.

- Rob.

On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 1:40 PM, Gareth Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

  Rob Myers [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
 Stallman believes that works of opinion are different from pieces of
 software. He is concerned that arbitrary modifications of a work of opinion
 could lead to misrepresentation, and he's not alone in that. Software
 doesn't really have that problem, so he's right that they are different.

 I don't agree with his conclusions on this particular issue, I'm just
 trying to explain that his position is coherent.
 Personally I don't agree with the conclusions either, but everyone is
 entitled to their opinions.

 I've no knowledge on Stallman philosophy on anything other than software.
 It just jumped out the screen at me, that after the big long article on
 freedom, you then get restrictions put on what you can do with the article.
 I wouldn't have even considered it if the CC licence had not been mentioned
 and the article was posted under the usual site copyright terms.

 --
 *Gareth Davis* | Production Systems Specialist
 **



Re: [backstage] BBC E-mail: It's not the Gates, it's the bars

2008-07-04 Thread Rob Myers
On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 1:50 PM, Gareth Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


 I was just following the CC link posted in the news article, it states no
 commercial use. Has the wrong version been linked?


Yes, it looks like it. Is that an error from the author or the publisher?
Just so I know who to email. :-)

- Rob.


Re: [backstage] BBC E-mail: It's not the Gates, it's the bars

2008-07-04 Thread Rob Myers
I agree that twisting people's words isn't good but the copyleft licences
such as BY-SA or the FDL do prevent mis-attribution of modified versions to
the original author.

- Rob.

On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 2:32 PM, Sean DALY [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I'm not sure I understand why one should have more freedom to twist
 Mr. Stallman's words than the protection under copyright to reuse and
 change traditional BBC articles.

 Mr. Stallman can be demanding (I have interviewed him twice, a
 daunting experience) but I think his message is very important. For my
 part I'm very pleased the BBC has seen fit to publish that commentary.

 Sean.


 On Fri, Jul 4, 2008 at 2:40 PM, Gareth Davis [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 wrote:
  Rob Myers [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Stallman believes that works of opinion are different from pieces of
  software. He is concerned that arbitrary modifications of a work of
 opinion
  could lead to misrepresentation, and he's not alone in that. Software
  doesn't really have that problem, so he's right that they are different.
 
  I don't agree with his conclusions on this particular issue, I'm just
 trying
  to explain that his position is coherent.
  Personally I don't agree with the conclusions either, but everyone is
  entitled to their opinions.
 
  I've no knowledge on Stallman philosophy on anything other than software.
 It
  just jumped out the screen at me, that after the big long article on
  freedom, you then get restrictions put on what you can do with the
 article.
  I wouldn't have even considered it if the CC licence had not been
 mentioned
  and the article was posted under the usual site copyright terms.
 
  --
  Gareth Davis | Production Systems Specialist
 
 
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Re: [backstage] Ashley Highfield leaves BBC (almost)

2008-04-14 Thread Rob Myers

Brian Butterworth wrote:


Cool.  Can I apply for his post please?


That depends. What work experience do you have at Microsoft?

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] iPlayer DRM is over?

2008-03-26 Thread Rob Myers

Tom Loosemore wrote:

I tell you, there's a big pot of money awaiting someone who develops a
trusted-enough tracker for usage of online video (a big recruited
online panel running background tracking software might even do...)


*cough* data protection *cough*. ;-)

- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] iPlayer DRM is over?

2008-03-26 Thread Rob Myers

Tim Dobson wrote:


Media players don't all have a function which sends a unique ID to server.


Hash the file or check the first 256 bytes. Or check the filename or 
url. Or the metadata. Tracking files doesn't require a clever system, 
just an intrusive one.


- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] The LSE's freetard fiasco

2008-03-24 Thread Rob Myers

Tim Dobson wrote:

its a pity that Andrew Orlowski couldn't have written up a 
unbiased version of the events, 


He can't, he needs the clicks. El Reg's advertising-and-merchandise 
business model model will fail unless he constantly gets attention by 
arguing against it. ;-)


- Rob.
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Re: [backstage] iPlayer DRM is over?

2008-03-13 Thread Rob Myers

Thomas Leitch wrote:


Wrong. It is locked.


Good luck if you lose your last front door key.

As another example, I can sell you a car and refuse to give you the keys 
after you give me the money. If you hire a locksmith and drive off 
anyway and I take you to court over this then my insistence that 
breaking locks is wrong won't get me very far.


- Rob.
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