Re: Block Universes

2014-02-03 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Mon, Feb 3, 2014 at 7:55 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 4 February 2014 13:32, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: On Mon, Feb 3, 2014 at 6:29 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: SR directly demonstrates block time via the relativity of simultaneity. This can be tested

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Feb 2, 2014 at 7:13 AM, ghib...@gmail.com wrote: Jesse - if the assumption is a fundamental geometry akin to the surface of a world, and if the speed of light is constant, then you could draw dots around that world for exact intervals of the speed of light, in which case the light

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Feb 2, 2014 at 5:13 PM, ghib...@gmail.com wrote: On Sunday, February 2, 2014 8:44:07 PM UTC, ghi...@gmail.com wrote: On Sunday, February 2, 2014 3:45:24 PM UTC, jessem wrote: On Sun, Feb 2, 2014 at 7:13 AM, ghi...@gmail.com wrote: Jesse - if the assumption is a fundamental

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Feb 1, 2014 at 9:00 AM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: And of course it is OBVIOUS that the twins share a common present moment when they compare clocks. Otherwise they couldn't compare clocks now could they? The fact that they can compare clocks, and agree for example that

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Feb 1, 2014 at 11:30 AM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: The fact that they can compare clocks, and agree for example that twin A's turning 30 coincides with twin B's turning 40, is because they are making the comparison at the same point in spacetime (assuming ideal point

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Feb 1, 2014 at 12:31 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, Yes, that being at the same point in spacetime is CALLED the present moment that I'm talking about. But your present moment goes beyond that and says that there is an objective common present moment for events

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Feb 1, 2014 at 1:58 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, Not correct. My present moment does NOT say that there is an objective common present moment for events that are *not* at the same point in spaceTIME (my emphasis). My theory says that there is a common universal

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Feb 1, 2014 at 4:28 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, PS: If coordinate time is just saying that when the twins meet up again they are actually at the SAME point in spacetime, but we don't know (can't agree) what clock time that corresponds to then I agree completely.

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-02-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Feb 1, 2014 at 10:21 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, Consider another case: Consider every observer in the entire universe. Every one of them is always currently in their own local actual time, their present moment. Are you just asserting your presentist views,

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-30 Thread Jesse Mazer
Edgar, if Omega=1 the universe wouldn't have the geometry of a hypersphere, 3D space would be flat--it would be more like a hyperplane. Only if Omega is greater than 1 would it have the positive curvature of a hypersphere (and if Omega is less than 1 space would have a hyperbolic geometry with

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-30 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Jan 30, 2014 at 7:53 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, Your first paragraph is correct. My theory, or at least this part of the theory, makes the prediction that the universe is a 4-dimensional hypersphere with p-time its radial dimension, i.e. that Omega is very

Re: Sum of all natural numbers = -1/12?

2014-01-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
I think the problem is that for non-converging series, there are multiple similar tricks you could do that would give different answers...for example: S = 1-1+1-1+1-1... -1*S = -1+1-1+1-1+1... For a finite or converging series, the order of the summation doesn't affect the final sum, so if in

Re: Sum of all natural numbers = -1/12?

2014-01-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, Jan 29, 2014 at 6:39 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 30 January 2014 12:34, Russell Standish li...@hpcoders.com.au wrote: On Thu, Jan 30, 2014 at 12:07:08PM +1300, LizR wrote: On 30 January 2014 12:11, Russell Standish li...@hpcoders.com.au wrote: Yes. Pity the poor

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 28, 2014 at 7:17 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Brent, But the twins DO AGREE on whose clock ran slower. So I don't see your point if you use the twins as evidence... Edgar Edgar, can you please answer my question about whether, when you talk about one clock

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-27 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Mon, Jan 27, 2014 at 8:22 AM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Brent, I don't think my statement is confused. Your response is ambiguous because it doesn't specify frames of reference correctly. The object's clock DOES tick slower according to the external observer's clock, but

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-27 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Mon, Jan 27, 2014 at 8:50 AM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Hi Jesse, Sorry if I misunderstood you and for the dismissive comment I apparently misread your comments... As for your other comments in this post. The slowing of the clock in a gravity well is an absolute

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-27 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Mon, Jan 27, 2014 at 10:48 AM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, First this doesn't have anything to do with present moment theory, only with standard physics. 2nd, hopefully it's just a matter of you using different semantics than me as to what is meant by absolute and

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
According to general relativity, neither gravity nor electric fields actually come out of the black hole's event horizon, rather the gravity and EM field felt by observers outside the horizon is a sort of frozen snapshot of the gravity/EM fields from all the matter that approached the horizon in

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Jan 25, 2014 at 1:25 PM, Richard Ruquist yann...@gmail.com wrote: On Sat, Jan 25, 2014 at 12:02 PM, meekerdb meeke...@verizon.net wrote: On 1/25/2014 5:29 AM, Edgar L. Owen wrote: Brent, We have to be careful to be precisely accurate here. 1. The structure of a black hole is

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 26, 2014 at 11:49 AM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, No. First you have a basic misunderstanding of relativistic time in your first paragraph. External observers DO see objects fall through the event horizon of a black hole with no problem at all. They don't get

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 26, 2014 at 12:47 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, No, you are just plain wrong here. It's simple relativity theory. Just because observer A sees observer B's clock slow down does NOT mean observer A sees observer B's MOTION slow down. In fact it is the increase

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 26, 2014 at 12:51 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, PS: It's not my theory, it's mainstream relativity theory. Any physicist and probably some others here can set you straight Edgar If you think this is mainstream physics, then can you please answer the

RE: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
Date: Sun, 26 Jan 2014 10:53:42 -0800 From: edgaro...@att.net To: everything-list@googlegroups.com Subject: Re: A theory of dark matter... Jesse, Respectfully, I don't have time to argue what is well known. If you don't believe me ask others here, or a physicist. If what you claim was true

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 26, 2014 at 1:53 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Jesse, Respectfully, I don't have time to argue what is well known. If you don't believe me ask others here, or a physicist. You are being evasive--you want me to ask a physicist but don't have time to tell me if you

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 26, 2014 at 4:31 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Brent, Liz and Jesse, OK, now I understand the effect you guys are referencing... I thought Jesse had been saying that things don't ACTUALLY fall into black holes, they just pile up on the event horizon surface, because

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 26, 2014 at 12:57 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: PS: In my post below that should read electric FIELDS can come out of a black hole, not electric CHARGES. Pardon the typo! Edgar I don't think it's right to say fields come out of the black hole. In classical

Re: A theory of dark matter...

2014-01-26 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 26, 2014 at 10:42 PM, Edgar L. Owen edgaro...@att.net wrote: Once again my initial response to Jesse was because he claimed there was a pile up and their isn't No I didn't. The very first comment of mine on the subject (you can review it at

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-16 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, Jan 15, 2014 at 7:08 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 16 January 2014 03:51, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: On Wed, Jan 15, 2014 at 5:10 AM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 15 January 2014 22:55, Bruno Marchal marc...@ulb.ac.be wrote: On 14 Jan 2014, at 22:04, LizR

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-15 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, Jan 15, 2014 at 5:10 AM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 15 January 2014 22:55, Bruno Marchal marc...@ulb.ac.be wrote: On 14 Jan 2014, at 22:04, LizR wrote: Sorry, I realise that last sentence could be misconstrued by someone who's being very nitpicky and looking for irrelevant

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-12 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 12, 2014 at 10:53 AM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Fri, Jan 10, 2014 at 2:23 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrot In classical physics there is no limit in principle to your knowledge of the microstate. Yes, 150 years ago every physicist alive thought

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-12 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jan 12, 2014 at 1:22 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: The entropy is defined not in terms of some vague notion of the number of ways the system could have gotten into its present microstate, but rather as the number of possible microstates the system might

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-10 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Fri, Jan 10, 2014 at 12:20 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: I never claimed Liouville's theorem was a fundamental law of physics in itself, Good, I agree. rather it is derivable as a mathematical consequence

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-10 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Fri, Jan 10, 2014 at 12:43 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 5:38 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: As a lot of people have now pointed out, physics can be local and relistic if time symmetry is valid. If time is symmetrical then retro-causality exists,

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 12:58 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 7:11 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: The equations of Newtonian dynamics are time-symmetric, I know. similarly for relativity both SR and GR - I know and quantum mechanics is, too.

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 12:08 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 2:34 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: I think you will find relatively few physicists who expect that any new fundamental theory like quantum gravity will fail to have these [time

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 12:24 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 2:41 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote For example, in Life one could define macrostates in terms of the ratio of white to black cells [...] In the Game of Life the number of black

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 11:53 AM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 1:42 PM, Bruno Marchal marc...@ulb.ac.be to me, the Bell's inequality experimental violation is a quite strong evidence for MW, that is QM-without collapse. To me Bell's inequality experimental

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 3:58 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Thu, Jan 9, 2014 at 2:02 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: And as I've said, there is also the fact that if the laws of physics don't conserve phase space volume, the 2nd law wouldn't hold either. You've

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 7:49 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 8 January 2014 13:14, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: The expansion of the universe is the most likely explanation for the entropy gradient - there are a number of ways in which it generates negative entropy, briefly

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 7:57 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 8 January 2014 12:53, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 4:35 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 8 January 2014 08:59, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: Well, most physicists already

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-08 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 1:58 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 2:59 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: Well, most physicists already agrees physics is time-symmetric I think you would have enormous difficulty finding one single physicist

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-08 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, Jan 8, 2014 at 1:47 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 1:24 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: you could have laws where a large number of initial states can all lead to the same final state (many cellular automata work this way, specifically

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 11:14 AM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Mon, Jan 6, 2014 at 2:36 PM, meekerdb meeke...@verizon.net wrote: he assumed this time asymmetry was fundamental, not a mere statistical effect related to the low entropy of the initial conditions of the experiment.

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 12:03 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 11:53 AM, Jason Resch jasonre...@gmail.com wrote: Read Bell's paper and you will see it is rife with QM language: http://www.drchinese.com/David/Bell_Compact.pdf I never said Bell didn't know

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 12:16 PM, Jason Resch jasonre...@gmail.com wrote: On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 11:00 AM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 11:14 AM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Mon, Jan 6, 2014 at 2:36 PM, meekerdb meeke...@verizon.net wrote

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 12:44 PM, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 12:00 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: he assumed this time asymmetry was fundamental, not a mere statistical effect related to the low entropy of the initial conditions

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 1:50 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 8 January 2014 05:51, John Clark johnkcl...@gmail.com wrote: On Mon, Jan 6, 2014 , LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: Bell's theorem holds only under a certain set of assumptions, True. As I've said many times Bell made

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 4:35 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 8 January 2014 08:59, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: Well, most physicists already agrees physics is time-symmetric (well, CPT-symmetric, but the implications are the same for Bell's inequality and thermodynamics

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2014-01-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 4:46 PM, LizR lizj...@gmail.com wrote: On 8 January 2014 07:13, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: They seem to have in common the idea that the maximum entropy can continually increase due to the expansion of space. But I don't think Layzer's account works

Re: What are wavefunctions?

2013-12-30 Thread Jesse Mazer
Even if this connection between entanglement and wormholes holds up, I don't think it automatically means quantum physics is nonlocal and we must discard the many-worlds claim to preserve locality. Keep in mind that in general relativity nothing can actually pass from one end of an Einstein-Rosen

Re: All randomness is quantum...

2013-12-28 Thread Jesse Mazer
Jason Resch wrote: indeed quantum randomness itself may only be a special case of this new type of randomness (discovered by Bruno). I don't think Bruno claims to have discovered the notion that there can be first-person randomness even in a universe which is deterministic from a third-person

Re: Another stab at the universal present moment - a gedanken..

2013-12-28 Thread Jesse Mazer
It is self-evident and experimentally proved that they can be in the same present moment even if their clock time t values are not simultaneous. What is experimentally proven is that two clocks A and B can show different times at the same coordinate time in some inertial frame--and coordinate

Re: A simple incontrovertible proof there are two kinds of time and a couple of implications

2013-12-27 Thread Jesse Mazer
But you haven't really given an argument for why there has to be something happening in Andromeda right now simultaneously with what's happening here on earth for cosmology to make sense--that seems to be just an assertion of faith on your part. Cosmology is perfectly coherent as an attempt to

Re: Another stab at the universal present moment - a gedanken..

2013-12-27 Thread Jesse Mazer
Have you considered that people understand what you mean, but just don't *agree* with your intuition? I am an eternalist rather than a presentist (see http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/time/#PreEteGroUniThe or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presentism_(philosophy_of_time) and

Re: How the STc principle (special relativity) puts both the arrow of time and a common present moment on a firm physical basis.

2013-12-25 Thread Jesse Mazer
The notion that everything travels through spacetime at the speed of light was popularized by Brian Greene, but it only works if you choose a rather odd definition of speed through spacetime, one which I haven't seen any other physicists make use of. See my post #3 on the thread at

Re: How the STc principle (special relativity) puts both the arrow of time and a common present moment on a firm physical basis.

2013-12-25 Thread Jesse Mazer
Hi Edgar, thanks for the reply. But do you agree or disagree with the point that since different frames are considered equally valid and they define simultaneity differently, either there would have to be no experimental means to determine which frame's definition of simultaneity is correct (so

Re: Minds, Machines and Gödel

2013-12-19 Thread Jesse Mazer
to but never quite reach. If I consider the statement Jesse Mazer will never think this statement is true, I may imagine the perspective of someone else and see that from their perspective it must be true if Jesse's thinking is trustworthy, but then I'll catch myself and see that this imaginary perspective

Re: Santa Klaus does exist!

2013-12-11 Thread Jesse Mazer
axiomatic system, including arithmetic, where we don't normally think of the relationships between propositions as causal ones. Jesse On Tue, Dec 10, 2013 at 4:06 AM, Bruno Marchal marc...@ulb.ac.be wrote: On 09 Dec 2013, at 23:03, Jesse Mazer wrote: I don't have institutional access but I

Re: Santa Klaus does exist!

2013-12-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
I don't have institutional access but I was able to read it online, though not to download it as a PDF (I just copy-and-pasted all the text for future reference instead). It's great to see each step of the argument laid out in greater detail than I've seen on the list (admittedly I don't

Re: Question for Bruno Regarding the question of whether information is physical.

2013-12-05 Thread Jesse Mazer
I think with black holes there's a physically natural coarse-graining defined by the no-hair theorem which says that in classical general relativity, the only distinguishing characteristics of black holes are mass, charge and angular momentum, they bear no other traces of the particular

How can a grown man be an atheist ?

2013-12-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
, and the Final Goal. OK. Everything is as God wills and allows it to be. I don't know. Bruno Sent from my iPhone On 02-Dec-2013, at 4:13 AM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: Most theistic philosophers and theologians who have considered the issue agree that God did

How can a grown man be an atheist ?

2013-12-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
' it is if it limits God? We believe that God is the Reality, the Prime Originator, the Sustainer, and the Final Goal. Everything is as God wills and allows it to be. Sent from my iPhone On 02-Dec-2013, at 4:13 AM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: Most theistic philosophers

Re: How can a grown man be an atheist ?

2013-12-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
from my iPhone On 02-Dec-2013, at 6:38 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: But consistency is itself a logical notion. If you think God can change the laws of logic, can God make it so that he is both perfect and not-perfect, with perfect having exactly the same meaning in both cases

Re: How can a grown man be an atheist ?

2013-12-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
wrote: You explained it yourself: ' so of course it is impossible for us to imagine what it might mean, '. Trying to answer it would be just pretending to be 'all-wise' and consequently making a fool of myself :) Samiya Sent from my iPhone On 02-Dec-2013, at 10:13 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma

Re: How can a grown man be an atheist ?

2013-12-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
that I've read of philosophers and theologians, discourages me as they only seem to go round and round in their efforts to make sense of it. Samiya On 03-Dec-2013, at 12:28 AM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.comjavascript:_e({}, 'cvml', 'laserma...@gmail.com'); wrote: But you do make

Re: Online opinions of Dennett and Chalmers-- the clueless two

2013-12-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
Chalmers a materialist? That seems like a pretty bizarre and/or uninformed description, given that the idea he is best-known for is that the hard problem of first-person qualia can never be solved by materialist explanations (even if the so-called easy problem of explaining third-person behaviors,

How can a grown man be an atheist ?

2013-12-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
Most theistic philosophers and theologians who have considered the issue agree that God did not create the laws of math and logic, and does not have the power to alter them (or any other necessary truths, which for theists might include things like moral rules, or qualities of God such as

Re: How can a grown man be an atheist ?

2013-12-01 Thread Jesse Mazer
prefers panpsychism as a solution to the metaphysical problem of the relation between consciousness and third-person objective reality) On Sunday, December 1, 2013, Jesse Mazer wrote: Most theistic philosophers and theologians who have considered the issue agree that God did not create

Re: doesn't dark matter falsify general relativity?

2013-11-27 Thread Jesse Mazer
Dark matter behaves pretty convincingly like large clumps of matter that, aside from not interacting with normal matter via non-gravitational forces, obeys the same sort of dynamical laws as any other form of matter, see the following for a good quick summary (note particularly the stuff about the

Re: Everything is real or unreal?

2013-11-15 Thread Jesse Mazer
I suspect this is one of those fake quotes that gets circulated around the internet; searching for everything we call real and bohr on books.google.com I mostly just find it in various religious/spiritual books, nothing scholarly (and nothing dating back to before 1986). Jesse On Fri, Nov 15,

Re: Everything is real or unreal?

2013-11-15 Thread Jesse Mazer
, if that is real? On Sat, Nov 16, 2013 at 9:11 AM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: I suspect this is one of those fake quotes that gets circulated around the internet; searching for everything we call real and bohr on books.google.com I mostly just find it in various religious/spiritual

Re: Our Demon-Haunted World

2013-11-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
chemical saturated moonscape as well as sucking up vast amounts of water from other potential uses -- including agriculture. Will the bitumen sweated out of that sand be worth the ultimate costs to get it? On Thursday, November 7, 2013 11:24 AM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote

Re: Our Demon-Haunted World

2013-11-09 Thread Jesse Mazer
://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-solar-challenge-natural-gas). Are you just assuming the future will be like the past, or do you have any other basis for predicting solar will always be just a fraction of world energy? Jesse -Original Message- From: Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com

Re: Our Demon-Haunted World

2013-11-07 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Nov 7, 2013 at 9:50 AM, spudboy...@aol.com wrote: Fur sure, that was the truth. Now we got's shale gas, which seems to pay a lot better, is safer to go after, and is cleaner, carbon-wise. Unless you are buying into technological unemployment (robots, software) then we have to face the

Re: Our Demon-Haunted World

2013-11-04 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Mon, Nov 4, 2013 at 3:18 AM, Telmo Menezes te...@telmomenezes.comwrote: Furthermore, her point is that competition in a free market actually helps everybody -- by providing better goods and services at lower prices -- while redistribution of money based on violence does not, and is in

Re: Is Earth F**ked?

2013-10-31 Thread Jesse Mazer
I think there's a strong chance climate change will end technological civilization, but I also think the situation is not hopeless, there are reasonably plausible scenarios I can imagine where we would avoid this fate. Chris, you mention disruptive technologies on the energy front but if you are

Re: R: Leibniz was quite the dandy!

2013-08-04 Thread Jesse Mazer
Usually you can track down the source of any genuine quote by entering it on books.google.com, this one shows up here: http://books.google.com/books?id=zfM8IAAJlpg=PP1pg=PA383 It's from an essay Maxwell wrote called Analogies in Nature, which begins on this page (two pages are missing from

Re: We are all naturally racists. Political correctness is likely to get you killed.

2013-07-17 Thread Jesse Mazer
Roger, can you please stop using this list as an outlet for any thoughts you have about politics and such? If it isn't related to the multiverse or some other fundamental metaphysical issues like consciousness, it doesn't belong here. Jesse On Wed, Jul 17, 2013 at 9:52 AM, Roger Clough

Re: Astigmatism Example

2013-04-03 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 2:42 PM, Craig Weinberg whatsons...@gmail.comwrote: In a universe of functionalism or comp, I would expect that this would never happen, as my brain should always prioritize the information made available by any eye that is open over that of an eye which is closed. I

Re: Ectopic Eyes Experient: Supports my view of sense, Invalidates mechanistic assumptions about eyes.

2013-03-04 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Mon, Mar 4, 2013 at 11:27 PM, Pierz pier...@gmail.com wrote: Really Craig? It invalidates mechanistic assumptions about eyes? I'm sure the researchers would be astonished at such a wild conclusion. All the research shows is brain plasticity in interpreting signals from unusual neural

Re: Nothing happens in the Universe of the Everett Interpretation

2012-11-30 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Fri, Nov 30, 2012 at 10:50 AM, Craig Weinberg whatsons...@gmail.comwrote: On Friday, November 30, 2012 10:32:35 AM UTC-5, yanniru wrote: On Fri, Nov 30, 2012 at 10:18 AM, Bruno Marchal mar...@ulb.ac.be wrote: Richard, On 28 Nov 2012, at 12:18, Richard Ruquist wrote: Bruno,

Re: Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle in Doubt

2012-10-18 Thread Jesse Mazer
There was another article about this group's work back in September, at http://www.nature.com/news/quantum-uncertainty-not-all-in-the-measurement-1.11394-- it seems as though this is not really about contradicting the mathematical form of uncertainty in the equations of quantum mechanics, but

Re: A remark on Richard's paper

2012-08-24 Thread Jesse Mazer
, Aug 23, 2012 at 8:19 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: A quibble with the beginning of Richard's paper. On the first page it says: 'It is beyond the scope of this paper and admittedly beyond my understanding to delve into Gödelian logic, which seems to be self-referential proof

Re: A remark on Richard's paper

2012-08-23 Thread Jesse Mazer
A quibble with the beginning of Richard's paper. On the first page it says: 'It is beyond the scope of this paper and admittedly beyond my understanding to delve into Gödelian logic, which seems to be self-referential proof by contradiction, except to mention that Penrose in Shadows of the

Re: A remark on Richard's paper

2012-08-23 Thread Jesse Mazer
suggesting he had read through the whole thing carefully? If not it's possible he skimmed it and missed that sentence, or just read the abstract and decided it didn't interest him, but sent the note out of politeness. Jesse On Thu, Aug 23, 2012 at 8:19 PM, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote

Re: free will and mathematics

2012-05-30 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 2:02 AM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: On 5/29/2012 11:46 PM, Jesse Mazer wrote: On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 10:49 PM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: Hi Jesse, Would it be correct to think of arbitrary as used here as meaning some

Re: free will and mathematics

2012-05-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, May 27, 2012 at 2:51 PM, Aleksandr Lokshin aaloks...@gmail.comwrote: To make the general idea more clear , suppose we are proving the well- known formula S = ah/2 for the area of a triangle. Our proof will necessarily begin as follows: “Let us consider AN ARBITRARY triangle…” Here

Re: free will and mathematics

2012-05-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 3:01 PM, Aleksandr Lokshin aaloks...@gmail.comwrote: *The notion of choosing isn't actually important--if a proof says something like pick an arbitrary member of the set X, and you will find it obeys Y, this is equivalent to the statement every member of the set X

Re: free will and mathematics

2012-05-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 4:38 PM, Aleksandr Lokshin aaloks...@gmail.comwrote: It is impossible to consider common properties of elements of an infinite set since, as is known from psycology, a man can consider no more than 7 objects simultaneously. That's just about the number of distinct

Re: free will and mathematics

2012-05-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 11:11 PM, Aleksandr Lokshin aaloks...@gmail.comwrote: 3)We have agfeed that the choice of an arbitrary element is not a random chaice and is not a choice determinate by some law. 4)Therefore I do call it a free will choice in mathematics. One can consider it as a

Re: free will and mathematics

2012-05-29 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Tue, May 29, 2012 at 10:49 PM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: Hi Jesse, Would it be correct to think of arbitrary as used here as meaning some y subset Y identified by some function i or mapping j that is not a subset (or faithfully represented) in X, yet x = y : x

Re: From 1905 the SRT doesn’t give sleep.

2012-04-23 Thread Jesse Mazer
. Jesse === On Apr 23, 12:03 am, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: On Sat, Apr 21, 2012 at 10:40 AM, socra...@bezeqint.net socra...@bezeqint.net wrote: From 1905 the SRT doesn’t give sleep. 1. One postulate of SRT takes vacuum as reference frame. Another postulate

Re: From 1905 the SRT doesn’t give sleep.

2012-04-23 Thread Jesse Mazer
some good arguments against the plausibility of such interpretations are offered at https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!msg/sci.physics.relativity/xD0x1urGWfo/YtmTWIYQ8aYJ Jesse On Apr 23, 2:17 pm, Jesse Mazer laserma...@gmail.com wrote: On Sun, Apr 22, 2012 at 11:25 PM, socra

Re: From 1905 the SRT doesn’t give sleep.

2012-04-22 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sat, Apr 21, 2012 at 10:40 AM, socra...@bezeqint.net socra...@bezeqint.net wrote: From 1905 the SRT doesn’t give sleep. 1. One postulate of SRT takes vacuum as reference frame. Another postulate of SRT takes inertial reference frame (s). No, none of the postulates take the vacuum as a

Re: Has anyone responded to Bostrom's argument against aggregative ethics?

2011-10-20 Thread Jesse Mazer
What about the idea that the choices you make are likely to reflect those of an infinite number of similar individuals? It's sort of like the issue of voting or trying to minimize your energy usage to help the environment, even if your individual choice makes very little difference, if everyone

Re: Singularities in GR

2011-09-15 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Sep 15, 2011 at 6:30 PM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: On 9/15/2011 5:17 PM, meekerdb wrote: On 9/15/2011 1:42 PM, Stephen P. King wrote: On 9/14/2011 9:49 PM, meekerdb wrote: snip On the contrary, the singularity is in the description. Which is why no physicist

Re: Singularities in GR

2011-09-15 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Sep 15, 2011 at 9:05 PM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: On 9/15/2011 6:59 PM, Jesse Mazer wrote: On Thu, Sep 15, 2011 at 6:30 PM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: On 9/15/2011 5:17 PM, meekerdb wrote: On 9/15/2011 1:42 PM, Stephen P. King wrote: On 9/14

Re: Singularities in GR

2011-09-15 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Thu, Sep 15, 2011 at 11:28 PM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: Hi Jesse, Any physically significant boost would act to alter the scale of Plankian effects, that is what general covariance basically tosses out any physically real notion of space-time points what ever

Re: Simulated Brains

2011-08-02 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Wed, Aug 3, 2011 at 1:14 AM, meekerdb meeke...@verizon.net wrote: On 8/2/2011 10:03 PM, Stephen P. King wrote: I'm just interested in how we would decide who won? If there is some test you can suggest or some theoretical development you anticipate it would be very relevant to the

Re: Block Time confirmed?

2011-07-24 Thread Jesse Mazer
On Sun, Jul 24, 2011 at 8:14 AM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: On 7/24/2011 12:05 AM, Jesse Mazer wrote: On Sat, Jul 23, 2011 at 11:24 PM, Stephen P. King stephe...@charter.netwrote: On 7/23/2011 9:45 PM, Jason Resch wrote: If you want to formulate block time without

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