Matt,

If you live in a remote area, with no potential interferers, then my comment does not apply. But last I heard you were deploying in the middle of Urban Atlanta and possibly Urban DC, with the potential for many interferers eventually.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL & Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


----- Original Message ----- From: "Matt Liotta" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "WISPA General List" <wireless@wispa.org>
Sent: Tuesday, December 12, 2006 7:39 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] high throughput backhaul options


Tom DeReggi wrote:
Because its greedy.
Its not greedy; efficient maybe, but not greedy.
And when your competitors is unsensitive to the fact that you are greedy, he combats your spectrum/radio, and you or he has no where to go (spectrum wise) for a resolution, he will win because he doesn;t have customers yet, and you do, so you will move to protect your revenue. Basically by using the full band, you are guaranteeing that anyone that deploys has no choice but to fight you for spectrum, meaning any channel they choose will interfere with you. Sure you can go narrow beam antenna, but its jsut a matter of time until someone bangs into you.

The above confuses me. In the situation where I have a PtP radio using the full band there is no colocation opportunity for a competitor on either side. That means the competitor would have be on a site near by to be affected by me and/or to affect me. If this hypothetical competitor doesn't have any customers then the deployment must be PtMP base station since a PtP wouldn't be very useful without a customer. Certainly the power output from a PtMP base station is going to be considerably less than my PtP link making it unlikely my equipment would be affected. Further, equipment that uses large channel widths tend to run simple modulations that have very good receive sensitivity.
The question that one asks is WHY? If you ahve an option that doesn't take the whole band, why would you choose one that does? Those decissions don't usually make friends, and non-friends tend to interfere.

When you put the question that way, sure, it seems silly. However, that assumes there is another option, which isn't necessarily the case. In fact, reading this thread so far seems to indicate that the available high throughput unlicensed radios have large channel widths.

-Matt
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