I posted this a while back (
http://www.mail-archive.com/apple-crop%40virtualorchard.net/msg02437.html),
but probably worth re-visiting. I found it very interesting. JC

http://www.wired.com/2014/01/new-monsanto-vegetables/


On Mon, May 5, 2014 at 11:51 AM, Fleming, William
<w...@exchange.montana.edu>wrote:

> The way to beat the GMO controversy, merited or not, is to use genetic
> mapping to find plants with desirable traits then cross them into the
> targeted crop with conventional breeding.
> I've talked with several anti GMO folks who have no problem with this
> method but you still can be sure it won't please everyone.
>
>
> Bill Fleming
> Montana State University
> Western Ag Research Center
> 580 Quast Lane
> Corvallis, MT 59828
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net [mailto:
> apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net] On Behalf Of Silsby, Ken
> Sent: Monday, May 05, 2014 8:23 AM
> To: Apple-crop discussion list
> Subject: Re: [apple-crop] apples and chemicals
>
> In January, I happened to attend a "standing room only" presentation on
> communicating about GMO crops at the Mid-Atlantic Convention in Hershey,
> PA.  The speaker was from the Center of Science in the Public Interest.
>  Their web site posts a 24 page bulletin on the subject at the link below.
>  The bulletin provides a good review for those who are in position to
> discuss the issue with the public.
>
> Link to "Straight Talk on Genetically Engineered Foods":
> http://cspinet.org/new/pdf/biotech-faq.pdf
>
> Thanks.
>
> Ken Silsby   Eastern Technical Manager, Apples
> Mobile: 716.471.5383 | Fax: 716.204.8065 ksil...@agrofresh.com
>
> www.agrofresh.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net [mailto:
> apple-crop-boun...@virtualorchard.net] On Behalf Of Shoemaker, William H
> Sent: Monday, May 05, 2014 9:04 AM
> To: Apple-crop discussion list
> Subject: Re: [apple-crop] apples and chemicals
>
> I don't know the answer to this question. I'm curious about it too. I also
> wonder how much of that kind of work is in development. I doubt anyone
> knows as so much of it is done in the private sector.
>
> But I remember conducting trials of pumpkins in the '90s on some
> virus-resistant GMO pumpkins that derived their genetic material from a
> different species within the cucurbit genus. I believe it was a wild
> species that was incompatible for an intergeneric cross. We really need
> such resistance but it was withdrawn because of perceived market risk.
>
> Bill
> William H. Shoemaker
> Retired fruit and vegetable horticulturist University of Illinois
> wshoe...@illinois.edu
>
>
> My question is this: does anyone know how many of the GMO crops/organisms
> that are currently approved for food crops actually involve genetic
> transfers among widely-separated species as compared to the number of GMOs
> that involve only modifications of genes within plants or the addition of
> virus coat proteins from viruses that are already commonly found in the
> plant species of interest?
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-- 
Jon Clements
aka 'Mr Honeycrisp'
UMass Cold Spring Orchard
393 Sabin St.
Belchertown, MA  01007
413-478-7219
umassfruit.com
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