Jenny, thanks for providing this great information! 
Laurie

-----Original Message-----
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of jbero tds.net
Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2009 12:30 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] introduction for Spicey

Hello Joyce,

You have a kind heart.  It's hard to take in a felv cat and sounds
like everyone in your world is going through alot.

With respect to felv, it's true, stress is tough on these guys.

There's alot of variables, opinions and conflicting ideas about the
disease.  Some cats do fine, some become carriers but do fine, and
some die fast and young.  Since yours is two years old already, that's
a start since many of the young ones (usually less than a year) die
from the disease early on.  The older they are the better their
chances of survival.

General recommendations I think almost universally accepted are - feed
high quality diets i.e. those high in protein, some good ones are evo
and nature's variety instinct (be careful when initially switching to
these foods mix with the old).  Some people suggest using raw diets
(these are excellent for healthy cats as it mimics their normal diet -
good ones are nature's variety and stella and chewy's) - other people
advice against it as there is the possibility of introducing bacteria
into their gut and they fear infection.  Personally from what I have
read and seen I think raw diet is better.

Next, try to reduce stress as much as possible - rescue remedy, a
flower essence extract has been used in both humans and animals to
reduce anxiety - it's easy to use and can be found in most herbal type
stores.  As far as him not leaving the crate, that's okay, small
enclosed areas are often comforting to a scared cat, I wouldn't force
him out, let him take his time.  Routines are very welcome by most
animals so try to maintain a routine if possible - this is less
important for cats than dogs but still helpful.

Medical treatment - this is a huge source of debate for most.  Some
say there is no treatment, give them as happy a life as possible until
they pass on.  Others say treat.  The big treatments include
interferon, imulan and acemannan.  None are 100% effective from what I
can tell.  There are stories to support and refute each.  I am
currently looking to find a combination of things that might be
effective.  Other less talked about treatments include high dose
vitamin c, NAC and vitamin E.  Some other natural remedies and immune
boosters (Wei Qui Booster)  are out there.  I have never heard of a
cure, but I continue to search.

With respect to the clavamox, I would be very suspicious.
Prophylactic treatment with an antibiotic is risky.  It can lead to GI
problems (diarrhea and vomiting as you kill off the healthy normal
bacterial flora of the gut and leave it wide open for bad bacteria),
kidney and liver failure, and development of bacteria resistant to the
antibiotic.  If there are no symptoms of infection and have not been
for some time I would seriously be cautious about this.  If there are
upper respiratory type symptoms; sneezing, clear runny nose and eyes,
lysine can be very effective at treating this - this can be ordered
online in a cat formula or purchased over the counter at walgreens or
similar store.

Lots of info, sorry.  You will certainly get lots more advice.  The
individuals in this group are intelligent, well read, and caring cat
lovers.

May God bless you and good luck.

Jenny

On 11/10/09, stargazer 12 <stargaze...@q.com> wrote:
>
> A very good friend passed away & her family didn't want the cat. Spicey
has
> feline leukemia going on 2 years.  I took the cat in & have him in a spare
> room away from my cats. He has been on clavamox for about 1 yr per my
> friend.  I am waiting on the vet to call to find out all the specifics. Is
> there any special food/vitamins/drugs to help? I know nothing of this
> disease. I have been during research & says the cat should not be
stressed.
> Unfortunately, Spicey has been stressed as his owner was in the hospital
> since last Tuesday. A neighbor was feeding him but he was hiding under the
> couch as he is very timid. And now he is in a strange place, so he has to
be
> very stressed. It has been 3 hours & he has not come out of his carrier, I
> do not know if he will be friendly with me but he has not hissed at all. I
> think I maybe taking on too much but in a small way I feel like I am
keeping
> my friend alive too.
>
>
>
> Any ideas/suggestions/advice will be greatly appreciated.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Joyce & Spicey
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>  EMAILING FOR THE GREATER GOOD
> Join me                                       
> _______________________________________________
> Felvtalk mailing list
> Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
>

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