well aprone you are one of the new hack it yourself generation.
I have no idea how you seem to put things out so quickly but you must be one of if not the fastest developer on record. I don't know how you can release a game in 24 hours, heck not even a comercial dev can do that.

I have been on the scenes since 1995 and on the audyssey lists from 1996.
Things have changed and changed a lot.

If I am allowed to ramble for a bit.

Back in the day about 1995 I got the net, audyssey was just a few zip files.
I read the mag and found it good.
I was on dos then.
One of the first companies to appear was pcs, followed closely by gmagames.
They were for a while to about 2001 or there abouts the only companies to take the market.
Pcs started the dos era, and such.
The community was small, we talked games mostly interactive fiction, and well a few others.
There were a few mainstreams that were good for windows like silent steel.
We had vary few issues back then except when a hacker attack spread annoying messages.
This was also the era where spam was actually usefull.
You got something back for what you sent and it was grand.

Ofcause it all changed in 2002 when esp came up could have been earlier.
This was the first company and probably the one to have the most company shifts.
Esp closed, opened, switched everything to adora  which is now draconis.
Tried to become alchemy then switched most of itself to usagames.
Between then, we had x-sight which still exists but has gone quiet for now and xlstudios which was really good, this became shaned.net
Which also switched to usagames.
danz was round with blindsoftware which also was bsc games and bsc and blindsoftware merged together just recently.
Then vipgameszone released a few games and I tested a couple.
Then alone came blindadrenaline.

Somewhere in the middle of what we will call the big company storm is when soundsupport and ultimately audiogames.net came in.
This was the first place we could go to get things and still is.
In fact its the experimental games and other games in the forum that keep the community going.
Oh l-works also came and still exists.
We have also got bavisoft which lasted for a couple years or so.

Then pb-games came on the sceen which was good then  became blastbay.
Which is where we are up to now.

The comercial companies have pulled back, and opensource hacker groups have taken off.
Bgt means that anyone can vertually make a game and several have done so.
Opensource industries have kept things going.
For a couple years a group I was part of pkb games which had dzk and a few others tried to make autoit games.
And a few soundpacks.
After that other mods and soundpacks came out.

I think most of this is correct, but it could be fun for a history of this community to be made. We sertainly have come a long way, through war and strife and some peacefull times, one stage we almost didn't exist. Now its a quiet period with opensource devs putting out a steady ammount of game related stuff, though most are due to the new hack it yourself load.
The comercial companies have done their bit and have backed off.
And its all free sailing for now.

W have moved from dos to simple windows to directx, to xna with entombed and mouse, gamepad and joystick, even multiplayer with servers.
So we are almost right up there.
There is not much we are missing.
OFcause we will never be on par with sighted graphically but sound wise I think we are up with the best of them, almost.
Usagames has started complex gameplay, and this can only get better.
Though its been mostly arcade with a few sims thrown in I think we are almost there, still have a little ways to go but with the speed of the opensource teams and such not much at the rate they are dishing out stuff.

At 08:11 a.m. 19/05/2011, you wrote:
First off, this is the second time I've written this post so it will probably be of lower quality this time around. My browser decided to glitch and I lost a very lost post, that was probably a full page if not a page and a half.

As one of the new guys in the community, relatively speaking, I debated even commenting on this topic. I wasn't around for the "golden era" so my perspective is extremely limited compared to those who have been around long enough to see the bigger picture.

That being said, I don't doubt things have slowed down with audio game development to some degree, I believe that is normal. I do, also, agree with Dark that a well made game can still use old ideas.

Recently I assembled a list of the audio games and tools I have released. I was honestly shocked by how short that list was! I kept thinking I had left things out, and it took me a while to accept that the list was accurate. The reason I felt like I had done more is because for every game/tool I've released, I have 2 that were only partially finished. While developing a new game, if I discover existing games that use the same general idea, I will get discouraged. The same is true when I read that someone else is currently developing a game with a similar style. In those cases, I will just push my project aside and start work on another. Part of the way through that design, there's always a chance the same thing will happen again.

Even if only half of the other developers are like me, that is a lot of developers holding off on projects because they are searching for a unique idea. Sure, if we stuck with it our games would be different in some ways, but they are still similar to something already out there. I always ask myself the question, "Why waste time when I could be making something totally unique?"

Over the years, many audio games have been created, and they represent many different game styles. For anyone trying not to repeat an existing game, this means our options are getting smaller and smaller all the time. New ideas are tricky, and they take longer to develop than the games based on old ideas. It is only natural for things to slow down because of this. I believe that this would still be true even if the old classic game companies were still around. They probably rode out the market until the trends started to change. It was a smart move on their part, if that is what they did.

New ideas also run the risk of being rejected. I released Daytona to be unique, and many people played it, but also many more didn't even care to try it. That's not meant to put anyone down, but it is just a reality. The more new and unique you make a game, the more likely it is that you've narrowed down on your potential player base. For this very reason I set my combat game aside because I didn't have faith that my player base would be large enough to help me support the ongoing server costs. I'm also fairly certain my next Daytona game will be completely passed over by a sizable portion of the community simply because it requires the mouse to play. I built Lunimals to be as close to "standard" as I could, and I'm sure its recent popularity speaks loudly in support of my theory.


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