> Don't you think if it were easy (or even possible) to make money -- to
stay
> in business -- at those prices, that there would be companies doing it?!?

No.  That is the theory of perfect markets.  Which is just ivory tower
economics BS.  Observe:

An economics graduate student and his professor are walking down the street.
The student sees a $20 bill laying on the ground.  He exclaims "Hey, look!
I found a $20 bill!".  The professor replies "Don't waste your time bending
to pick it up.  It's just an illusion.  If it really existed, it would have
already been picked up by someone else."

Perfect markets cannot exist when a monopoly exists.  And MS is a monopoly.
And so is any program that locks your data into a proprietary file format
which is undocumented.

I read something a while ago that said that MS has a profit margin of 85% on
their office suites.  That's one heck of a margin!  I wish I could make that
margin on hardware sales!  Assuming Office costs $499, they could reduce
their price to $75 and still break even.  Probably further than that,
really, I bet their margin is even more than 85%.

> Most of the folks on this list are hardware people.  I've been developing
&
> selling software for 20 years, and I can tell you IT AIN'T EASY.
Delivering
> quality software takes a lot of time and a lot of talent, which = $$$.

Dwight, I visited your website.  Your situation is different than what I am
talking about because you make niche market and specialty software.  You
don't have a large market to spread development cost against.  But vendors
of OS, office suites, RAD IDEs, compilers, and some CAD apps do.

I write software, as well as design hardware.  The software I write isn't as
big as an OS or office suite.  It's embedded software.  And bugs are not
tolerated in embedded software.  A machine control system crashing is simply
not tolerable, especially when it may cause injury.  And embedded software
must be fault tolerant.  Every function I write has to be written with an
analysis of how it will behave if given erroneous conditions.  How long do
you think I could stay in business if my embedded software crashed as often
as Windows or some Windows apps (i.e. Protel, Autocad, etc.)?  I see none of
the methods of software testing I have read about over the years being
applied to desktop apps.  Typical PHB Software Manager says, "Fault
simulation, resource monitoring, memory leak checking, bounds checking,
regression testing, what's all that fancy stuff?  Never heard of them.  Just
write it, click on each menu item and dialog once to make sure they pop up,
and ship it!"

It's true what you say about quality software taking a lot of time and
talent.  But your time investment doesn't vanish after the current version
is delivered.  You have the source code to make improvements on, and add new
features to, for the next version.  So why does software keep going up in
price, when all that IP already exists and doesn't have to be rewritten from
scratch?  And to add insult to injury, many of the software jobs are being
moved to low wage countries, such as India.  Why doesn't the price of the
software go down when that happens?

Best regards,
Ivan Baggett
Bagotronix Inc.
website:  www.bagotronix.com


----- Original Message -----
From: "Dwight Harm" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "Protel EDA Forum" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Wednesday, October 22, 2003 3:18 AM
Subject: Re: [PEDA] Open source SP7


> ...see below...
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Bagotronix Tech Support [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
> > Sent: Tuesday, October 21, 2003 10:47 AM
> >
> > Free software can be great, but it won't save the world.  Commercial
> > software can be great, but it's straying further and further from the
good
> > value it should be.  I should be able to buy a boxed retail OS for $39,
a
> > great boxed office package for $39, and a boxed RAD IDE compiler
> > for $199 or less.  Since this is not the case, Linux and other free
> software
> > is the next best alternative.  And it will remain so, until the software
> > producers wake up and realize their prices are too high.
>
> Don't you think if it were easy (or even possible) to make money -- to
stay
> in business -- at those prices, that there would be companies doing it?!?
>
> Most of the folks on this list are hardware people.  I've been developing
&
> selling software for 20 years, and I can tell you IT AIN'T EASY.
Delivering
> quality software takes a lot of time and a lot of talent, which = $$$.
>
> Dwight.




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