RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-12 Thread Stuart Foulstone
This point originally concerned which character to use IF you use a character to separate links. It did NOT say that this was the preferred method. On Mon, May 12, 2008 2:18 am, Jens-Uwe Korff wrote: Screen-reader users have said that the vertical bar is THEIR preferred character Really? Do

RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-11 Thread Jens-Uwe Korff
Screen-reader users have said that the vertical bar is THEIR preferred character Really? Do you have any data supporting your claim? I'm happy to learn more since we cannot conduct user tests on our end. As was pointed out before, I thought a read of List. 5 items. Item one: . Item two:

RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Jens-Uwe Korff
The most common separator used in such circumstances ... is the vertical bar...whilst it is quite wordy That's the reason why I've started *not* to use it anymore. I'm using borders instead and add the class last to the last list element to apply no borders at all. Whilst a border is slightly

RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Stuart Foulstone
The reason for putting the character there in the first place is explicitly to help screen-reader users distinguish between links. Screen-reader users have said that the vertical bar is THEIR preferred character (even though this means repeating vertical bar) since it is not used for anything

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Darren West
The reason for putting the character there in the first place is explicitly to help screen-reader users distinguish between links. It is my understanding that the fact that they are seperate links is what distinguishes between links ... Screen-reader users have said that the vertical bar is

RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Steve Green
_ From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Darren West Sent: 09 May 2008 12:53 To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org Subject: Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links The reason for putting the character there in the first place is explicitly to help screen-reader users

RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Darren Lovelock
12:53 To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org Subject: Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links The reason for putting the character there in the first place is explicitly to help screen-reader users distinguish between links. It is my understanding that the fact that they are seperate links is what

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Rob Kirton
@webstandardsgroup.org *Subject:* Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links The reason for putting the character there in the first place is explicitly to help screen-reader users distinguish between links. It is my understanding that the fact that they are seperate links is what distinguishes

RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Darren Lovelock
2008 12:53 To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org Subject: Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links The reason for putting the character there in the first place is explicitly to help screen-reader users distinguish between links. It is my understanding that the fact that they are seperate links is what

RE: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Thierry Koblentz
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Rob Kirton Sent: Friday, May 09, 2008 7:00 AM To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org Subject: Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links Darren I'd be highly surprised if a screen reader manages to read CSS. Most struggle with HTML

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-09 Thread Patrick H. Lauke
Rob Kirton wrote: I'd be highly surprised if a screen reader manages to read CSS. Most struggle with HTML But the screen reader doesn't need to read the CSS, as the DOM already makes it quite clear where each link starts/stops, and screen readers can easily distinguish between them even

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread Ian Chamberlain
I tend to use a good old unordered list for such things Bob. - Original Message - From: Designer [EMAIL PROTECTED] To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org Sent: Thursday, May 08, 2008 10:03 AM Subject: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links I have run into a problem with having two adjacent links

[WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread Designer
I have run into a problem with having two adjacent links at the top of a page. The WAI validator complains: 10.5 Until user agents (including assistive technologies) render adjacent links distinctly, include non-link, printable characters (surrounded by spaces) between adjacent links.

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread Matthew Pennell
On Thu, May 8, 2008 at 10:03 AM, Designer [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote: 10.5 Until user agents (including assistive technologies) render adjacent links distinctly, include non-link, printable characters (surrounded by spaces) between adjacent links. [Priority 3] What is the current thinking on

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread Mike at Green-Beast.com
Hi Bob, I have run into a problem with having two adjacent links at the top of a page. You can use a list as someone mentioned, you can also add a hidden character. Example: div id=sitelink p [a href=sitemap.htmlSite Map/a span | /span a

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread Rahul Gonsalves
On 08-May-08, at 2:33 PM, Designer wrote: The WAI validator complains [...] Do you have to build a WAI-validating site? If you don't have to, I would suggest ignoring that guideline, as it doesn't necessarily enhance accessibility for visitors. I would suggest using :focus to provide

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread Stuart Foulstone
From a usability/accessibility point a view. The most common separator used in such circumstances (and therefore that most expected by screen-reader users) is the vertical bar. i.e. IF you add extra characters for accessibility, use the ones they are familiar with (usability). Addition:

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread Ben Buchanan
What is the current thinking on this? How can I do this WITHOUT putting any characters in there? I don't emwant/em any characters in there! You could put the two links into a list. That would separate them into two disctinct elements without requiring punctuation. I'm not 100% sure of the

Re: [WSG] The Problem of adjacent links

2008-05-08 Thread David Hucklesby
On Thu, 8 May 2008 15:52:38 +0100 (BST), Stuart Foulstone wrote: From a usability/accessibility point a view. The most common separator used in such circumstances (and therefore that most expected by screen-reader users) is the vertical bar. How about a border?