@Shannon: thanks for the feedback on this. The new screens are fluid in size
so wrap to the available space. Hosting in a local iframe isn't something
we've encouraged in the past. We prefer the user to be taken to the
authenticate or authorize page in a tab/new window that they can see the URL
of. This is a good area for us to write some guidance for so thanks for
raising this.

@Orian: great feedback and definitely something for us to take on board -
thanks. This is a first release of these pages to get a feel for if they are
going in the right direction. We tried to select a number of phrases that
explain the access that's being granted to an application but that are also
easy to understand. I think there will always be some that don't make it,
but there are others, like the ones you raise, which would help aid
transparency more.

@themattharris

On Thu, Apr 28, 2011 at 3:00 PM, Orian Marx (@orian) <or...@orianmarx.com>wrote:

> I think it's good to be giving users more information on what they are
> granting access to, but by leaving out a number of things there are
> misleading implications. In particular, this list does not mention
> that users will be granting access to all their private DMs. I also
> find it interesting the list mentions the ability to follow new
> people, but not to unfollow existing people.
>
> Obviously it's been to everyone's benefit who has built apps that rely
> on OAuth up to this point that there has been specific mentioning of
> access to DMs as this would likely turn off a lot of people from
> granting access to experimental apps. The reality is that the OAuth
> system needs finer-grained controls. It would be good to hear if there
> has been any new thought on this from Twitter engineering.
>
> Otherwise, I like the new page :)
>
> @orian
>
> On Apr 28, 5:02 pm, Matt Harris <thematthar...@twitter.com> wrote:
> > Hey Developers,
> >
> > Some of you may have noticed already that earlier today we deployed a
> > redesign of the OAuth screens.
> >
> > We know both you and your users have been asking for better clarity about
> > what an application can see and do with an account and these screens are
> a
> > step towards doing that.
> >
> > One of the areas we wanted to improve is showing the details of your
> > application. If you visit the new screens you will see we've separated
> your
> > application details from the permissions that are being requested. We did
> > this to help users see that it is your application, not Twitter's.
> Remember
> > you can update your application details at anytime onhttp://
> dev.twitter.com/apps.
> >
> > Mobile and international support has also been improved and we now use
> the
> > same rendering templates as those created for Web Intents. This ensures
> the
> > design matches the rest of #newtwitter and, more importantly, works
> > cross-browser, cross-platform, and multilingual.
> >
> > We hope you find the new designs more welcoming and friendly. Let us know
> > what you think.
> >
> > Best,
> > @themattharris
> > Developer Advocate, Twitterhttp://twitter.com/themattharris
>
> --
> Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
> API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
> Issues/Enhancements Tracker:
> http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
> Change your membership to this group:
> http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk
>

-- 
Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
Issues/Enhancements Tracker: http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
Change your membership to this group: 
http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk

Reply via email to