Thanks for the lively counter-arguments!

Say, was or was not the demo on the same table in the same corner in
the same room in the same huge industrial building within which tests
have been run over and over in recent months?...

High voltages allow much thinner wires to carry the same energy with
smaller currents...

I suggest skeptical ideas, so they can hopefully be decisively dispatched.

I was impressed by Ed Storms' explanation that steady input energy
can serve to stabilize a positive feedback energy generation process
just under the level of high output beyond which meltdown or explosion
occurs...

So, also, it seems that a undercover operator could use hidden
portable gamma and neutron intensity and spectral analyzers to
accurately and quickly garner critical information while hanging
around near a operating unit, wearing a tweed jacket, if not a trench
coat or a white lab coat?

I'd like to know more about NiH as a "spillover" catalyst -- can
someone explain in detail and give sources?

Thanks,  Rich

On Tue, Jan 18, 2011 at 9:29 PM, Jed Rothwell <jedrothw...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Rich Murray <rmfor...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> A hidden factor of 4 increase in electric power input to a resistive
>> heater is possible: Rich Murray 2011.01.18
>
> It would have to be a factor of 30, not 4. The power meter shows 400 W, and
> the output is 12 kW.
>
>>
>> 1. Use four power input wires, one hidden from the floor up through
>> the inside of each of the four table legs -- in fact table legs could
>> conceal as many as 4 -- 9 wires each -- has anyone tried moving the
>> table?
>
> That's preposterous. You can see that the machine is sitting on a board with
> rubber feet and has been moved around from one photo to the next. You know
> that the researchers who verified it inserted the temperature probes and
> tubes, insulation and blue tape all over it. Do you really, seriously think
> they would not notice wires going into it?
> This is real life, not a pulp thriller novel or James Bond.
>
>>
>> 2. A single thin wire can supply power at lower current and higher
>> voltage, as a thin layer of insulating plastic can insulate 880 AC
>> volts, 4 X 220 volts, and 1/4 the current at 220 volts, as Er = V**2 X
>> I = 4**2 X 1/4 = 16 X 1/4 = 4 ...,ie, 4X more energy.
>
> Have you ever seen the size of the wires going into a 10 kW electric motor
> or heater? It is enormous!
> - Jed
>

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