> Some of this can be affected by the architect and what they deem
aesthetically pleasing...

This is one of the few things that actually still gets under my skin in
this line of work.  Architects refusing to allow the installation of access
points due to aesthetics is ludicrous.  We recently ran into this - even
after presenting options for mounts and covers to hide our APs in a new
building.

What about that big red fire alarm horn/strobe, are you not going to allow
that?

When the complaints about poor wireless performance come in, will you, oh
great architect and designer of all things beautiful, come in and help us
troubleshoot?

How will it make you feel when we have to slap wire mold all over your
glorious aesthetically pleasing creation to run data out to the APs that we
end up having to install after you turn the building over to us?  I guess
as long as the wire mold isn't there for the opening ceremony it doesn't
matter.

If you happen to be in a position that has enough power to push back on
architects and their asinine refusal to allow installation of access
points, please back your local networking folks.

OK, back to some deep breathing exercises.

Jonathan Miller
Network Analyst
Franklin and Marshall College


On Thu, Oct 24, 2019 at 1:50 PM Ronald Loneker <rlone...@cse.edu> wrote:

> Good Afternoon -
>
> Some of this can be affected by the architect and what they deem
> aesthetically pleasing...
>
> When our theater was built in our fine and performing arts center 12 years
> ago, the architect was against us putting access points on the wall due to
> aesthetics.  We ended up putting on AP in our projection booth and one
> backstage in one of the wings.
>
> Our theater was originally slated to be used for all purposes
> (performances, concerts, lectures, conference presentations, admissions
> Open Houses, etc) so it really could have used a lot more connectivity than
> what we could put in the theater.
>
> Three years ago, we upgraded the APs in the fine and performing arts
> center and, with new leadership at the college, added three more access
> points to support more connections.  Our theater has 560 seats, and we did
> have a conference that we streamed video plus had public wifi available and
> we seem to be fine with connectivity.
>
> If you can do it and not get pushback from the architect, I'd recommend
> you build it into your plans for having availability day one.
>
> (then you can sit in the back of the theater and watch all the parents
> with their smart phones raising them up and see the sea of phone screens as
> they record their kids' performances...because it will happen when you
> eventually rent out the space...)
>
> Ron Loneker, Jr.
> Director, IT Special Projects
> College of Saint Elizabeth
> Mahoney Library
> 2 Convent Road
> Morristown, NJ  07960
>
> Phone:  973-290-4229
>
> e-mail:  rlone...@cse.edu
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Tue, Oct 22, 2019 at 12:44 PM Bull, Mary <mb...@wm.edu> wrote:
>
>> Hello all,
>>
>>
>>
>> I’m wondering if anyone here has dealt with a decision on wireless in the
>> theaters, concert halls, or recital halls on their campus. We have a new
>> arts complex coming on line in the next two years and there’s no clear
>> direction from faculty on whether wireless for the audience is desirable.
>> The previous main theater, and other currently used theaters on campus,
>> did/do not have full connectivity for the audience (just a few aps tacked
>> on the walls that were useless when the room was full). Facilities planning
>> is favorable toward building it in, so I’d prefer that too, especially
>> since it would be much harder or impossible to install if the faculty
>> changes their mind in a few years once the building is complete. However,
>> I’m not sure whether there is really an expectation from the audience that
>> they should have wifi when they attend a show or concert.
>>
>>
>>
>> Has anyone dealt with this on their campus? What influenced your choice?
>>
>>
>>
>> Mary Bull
>>
>> William and Mary
>>
>> 757-221-2491
>>
>> mb...@wm.edu
>>
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