If the IP transit provider can sell you 500 or 1000 Mbps IP, what would
prevent them in the topology of their network from building a circuit as L2
transport back to a gigE handoff at your existing network?  They have
footprint in the new possible territory but not where you're currently
located?

If you're taking a default route from some 3rd party provider and getting a
block of IPs from them you'll have very little or no control over routing,
peering to content sources, etc.

Based on the description for a couple hundred houses I don't see why this
couldn't all fit in a pedestal sized outdoor cabinet 45RU in height, with
sufficient depth for modern equipment. This is a power/rectifier cabinet
for $2k, strip out the existing stuff.

http://usedtowers.com/product/emerson-single-bay-loaded-cabinets/



On Mon, Feb 12, 2018 at 12:39 PM, Chuck McCown <ch...@wbmfg.com> wrote:

> OK to answer a handful of questions from this thread.
>
> 1)    This turf is a long way away from all my other stuff, so I don’t
> want to actually build a building over there.  Nice to get in out of the
> rain when you are doing onsite but it it is built correctly it can be
> either remotely managed or some smart hands can run out and swap the bad
> hardware.
>
> 2)    I do have a resolver available at another site, I also have access
> to CDNs.  There are options.  But you know, 8.8.8.8 always seems to work
> whenever my “real” DNS is not working correctly.
>
> 3)    The DIA provider may be able to give me some rack space, so my
> anxiety about having it all under snow in a box in the side of a country
> road may be for nothing.
>
> 4)    Do I really care where the DNS is geographically?
>
> Right now I am shopping for used horse trailers to convert into a splicing
> trailer.
>
>
>
> *From:* Mathew Howard
> *Sent:* Monday, February 12, 2018 1:28 PM
> *To:* af
> *Subject:* Re: [AFMUG] ISP in a box
>
> A CCR could certainly do DHCP and NAT... I seem to remember there being
> some reason that made using Mikrotik for a DNS server a bad idea, but it
> would be capable of doing that too.
> It doesn't take much to run a DNS server, so it might not be a bad idea to
> stick some kind of a little server in there anyway, but I really don't see
> any reason why it couldn't all go in a cabinet on the corner of the
> street... it wouldn't even need to be a particularly large cabinet.
>
> On Mon, Feb 12, 2018 at 1:59 PM, Chuck McCown <ch...@wbmfg.com> wrote:
>
>> Had a subdivision developer contact me, wanting service for their hundred
>> or so homes.
>> I can get DIA close to the area at a reasonable area.  It will require
>> some build but that is OK, that is something I feel some level of
>> expertise.
>>
>> Considering a minimal NOC build.
>>
>> I asked this question of someone once before and I cannot find their
>> answer.  Not sure if asked on the list or not.  But the answer went
>> something like this:
>>
>>
>>    1. Buy a big CCR.
>>    2. Hire Linktechs to configure it.
>>    3. Put in a big switch for the AE SFPs and rock and roll.
>>
>>
>> I am sure I would need at least one server.  DHCP, NAT, DNS?
>> But can all of that be provided by the CCR?
>>
>> What is the smallest NOC configuration that could be created?
>>
>> Batts, rectifier, cooling.
>>
>> I really could put all this in a cabinet on the corner of the street.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>

Reply via email to