Since we're at it, it did the same calculation for all four countries ranked first in gender equality by the Global Gender Gap Report. All four, as far as I remember, provide generous paternity leaves that guarantee job security and can be shared between mother and father.

ISI indexed publications in Ecology per capita (countries ranked in order of 'gender equality index')
Iceland: 1167
Norway: 1794
Finland: 1500
Sweden: 1361

Not only do these countries do significantly better in ecology 'per capita' than the less family-oriented scientific powerhouses (e.g. USA: 650, UK: 660), but it almost seems that if anything, their ranking in the gender equality index is correlated with their productivity, not an 'impediment' ... safe for Iceland, but do remember that Iceland suffered the largest financial collapse in world history in these last 5 years.

Even when this small sample and oversimplified analysis is not proof of anything, I hope it can change peoples' perceptions that countries that have increased social welfare, gender equality and more protective labour laws are less productive.



Andres Lopez-Sepulcre
Laboratoire d'Ecologie, UMR 7625
Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris
alo...@biologie.ens.fr

http://web.me.com/asepulcre








On Apr 27, 2012, at 6:43 PM, Cecilia Hennessy wrote:

PERFECT response, thank you so much! If we Americans could stop patting ourselves on the back long enough to realize that other countries have successful ways of doing things too, maybe we could learn from international example and progress more efficiently. cheers!

On Fri, Apr 27, 2012 at 7:48 AM, Andres Lopez-Sepulcre <lopezsepul...@gmail.com > wrote: "...however, why should the USA modify the system producing among the best and most successful scientists in the world..."

I would simply like to add a quick clarification. I struggled with how to respond to this US-centric statement. There is no doubt that the USA is a scientific powerhouse and I have wonderful things to say about my experience as a scientist there, which has brought me wonderful collaborations I hope last long. However I am not sure it is fair to compare a country of over 300 million inhabitants with another of 5 (Finland). In fact, I took the liberty do do a quick search in Web of Science for articles in the area of 'Environmental Sciences and Ecology' for both countries in the last 5 years. USA showed 204,414 in front of 8,119 Finnish articles indexed in ISI. If one thinks 'per capita', the USA has produced 650 indexed articles in ecology per million inhabitants, while Finland has produced 1,500. With this I do not mean to say that Finland is better or worse... but just to show that, when the comparison is done 'fairly', maternity leaves do not seem to be hampering Finnish ecology. Productivity can be achieved without equality and social welfare suffering.





Andres Lopez-Sepulcre
Laboratoire d'Ecologie, UMR 7625
Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris
alo...@biologie.ens.fr

http://web.me.com/asepulcre








On Apr 12, 2012, at 6:52 PM, Amanda Quillen wrote:

"...however, why should the USA modify the system producing among the best and most successful scientists in the world..."



--
Cecilia A. Hennessy
PhD Candidate
Purdue University
715 W. State St
Pfendler Hall, G004
West Lafayette, IN 47907-2061
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cell: 574-808-9696

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