On 14 Jul 2012, at 15:47, Stephen P. King wrote:

On 7/14/2012 4:46 AM, Bruno Marchal wrote:

On 14 Jul 2012, at 06:16, Stephen P. King wrote:

On 7/13/2012 11:51 PM, meekerdb wrote:
On 7/13/2012 7:31 PM, Stephen P. King wrote:

Does unpredictability that you have mentioned in another message will help in this respect? If yes, how?

If you're asking whether unpredictability eliminates responsibility, the answer is no.

Brent
Hi Brent,

OK, so does the converse hold? Predictability eliminates responsibility? That sentence looks very wrong....

Right. Predictability is irrelevant to the social concept of responsibility.

Brent
--


OK, so what is relevant? What action is the determinant of a given quantity of responsibility? Knowledge? No, that can't be because that involves predictability. So, I am at a loose. Please enlighten me.

Knowledge of our ignorance. Numbers intrinsic knowledge of their own relative ignorance.

Bruno


http://iridia.ulb.ac.be/~marchal/


So then we can think of numbers as "quantities of relative ignorance"?

Not at all. I was thinking of the numbers encoding persons relatively to universal numbers. Those numbers bears first person views and can acknowledge their ignorance.



That is much better than the "ghosts of departed quantities" that Newton had! But how does this answer my question of responsibility?

Because those numbers can hesitate and take decision acknowledging their ignorance, and develop a notion of responsibility.




You are talking to a different question and assuming a measure exists where one cannot be defined.

You jump from one subject to another. As I said to John Clark, the self-indetermination used in free will has nothing to do with the first person indeterminacy, which is related to the measure problem.



The absence of a property is the complement of the property, no?

In some context.


This is where we cannot avoid some form of set theory and it is exactly where we get into trouble!

There is no part of Cantor paradise we can really avoid when studying machine's psychology. Set theory, complex analysis, you name it. I don't see the problem you are alluding too, beyond the fact that comp is used here to formulate and make precise some problem indeed.

bruno


http://iridia.ulb.ac.be/~marchal/



--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Everything List" group.
To post to this group, send email to everything-list@googlegroups.com.
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to 
everything-list+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/everything-list?hl=en.

Reply via email to