Not to mention, simpler patterns reminiscent of the output of some
iterative cellular automata do show up in nature.

See http://www.wolframscience.com/nksonline/page-423 for an example of
sea-shell patterns that look an awful lot like some of the patterns in
his book A New Kind of Science.

On Thu, Sep 13, 2012 at 4:26 PM, John Clark <johnkcl...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Tue, Sep 11, 2012 at 5:20 PM, Craig Weinberg <whatsons...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> > Statistically, shouldn't we see this simple 1K sequence frequently in
>> > nature? I mean precisely. Shouldn't there be hundreds of species of beetle
>> > that have patterns on their backs which are derived exclusively from the
>> > Mandelbot set.
>
>
> There's nothing special about the Mandelbrot Set, it's just the first
> example found where huge complexity can be generated from very little. And
> if you want to see what can be done with a 400 meg file just look in a
> mirror, that's about the size of the human genome; you could burn the entire
> thing onto a CD and still have room for 100 pop songs from iTunes.
>
>   John K Clark
>
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