Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread Margo





Hi Jennifer,
 Well, I think she will need some help. I am surprised that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing something about it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is drinking, but it is impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she must have either IV or sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined with the B-12) to start her eating again, it can be miraculous.If you don't want to try the Clavamox, then take her (what is her name?) in and request sub-q fluids (and have them show you how to do it at home) and askabout Convenia, a long-lasting injectable antibiotic. I don't generally recommend it, but it's better than nothing, and less stressful for both of you. Explain that medicating orally seems too stressful. You could ask about appetite stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as well, so maybe you don't want to try. 
 Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's and assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time to give to this.I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term care,get to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY for sub-q or IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most Vets will allow drop-off. 
 Please help herby gettingthe dehydration resolved. She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or move. At least she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course you elect to follow.
All the best,
Margo
-Original Message- From: Jennifer Ballew <balle...@gmail.com>Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM To: felvtalk <FELVTALK@FELINELEUKEMIA.ORG>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-( 
They took her temp yesterday and no fever. She's not showing any outward signs of infection, so that's good I guess. I'm just wondering if she's going to be able to pull out of this. :-(
Jennifer
On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, "moonsister22" moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:
Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and fast rule is to think "simple" first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and your brain cells on high alert.Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.Sent from my iPodOn Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote: Hey all- This is the first time I have posted to the forum. I have two FeLV positive cats, one two and one three years old. The older cat has never had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her. Just within the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very unsteady and wobbly. I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated. They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to possibly being dehydrated. They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home. I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was alive so that she would have the best chances. I'm just wondering if any of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left. I'm sincerely heartbroken. I really thought I had nursed her through the most risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live a halfway long life. In any case, if anyone has any advice or information I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks all, Jennifer -- "To love is to risk not being loved in return. To hope is to risk pain. To try is to risk failure, But risk must be taken, Because the greatest hazard in life Is to risk nothing." --Leo Buscaglia ___ Felvtalk mailing list Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org___Felvtalk mailing listFelvtalk@felineleukemia.orghttp://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread Lee Evans
Using a feeding syringe (3cc syringe) is better than stuffing pate in her 
mouth. You have to blend the pate with some soup (not with onion though) until 
it's like very thick cream and give her about a half syringe at a time. Towel 
on lap, tissue box nearby at hand, cat on lap, soft loving talk to cat, syringe 
at corner of mouth is how I syringe feed my cats during illness. Be sure to 
wipe her mouth frequently and do the feeding slowly. It may take almost a half 
hour but if you do it with loving murmurs, she will feel that she is spending 
quality time with you instead of having food stuffed into her mouth. Feeding 
tubes are invasive and uncomfortable for cats and should be a last resort. I 
usually use Hills A/D as it's a very soft pate made for syringe feeding ill 
cats. You buy it at the vet clinic. Get about 5 cans as you will be throwing 
away left overs that have already been blended. Try to get a half a can at a 
time into her. Once you syringe feed for
 a short time, their regular appetite takes over. Also, I would recommend you 
ask your vet about a antibiotic injection instead of pills or liquid.




On Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:01 AM, Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net 
wrote:
 
 
 
Hi Jennifer,
   Well, I think she will need some help. I am surprised 
that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing something about 
it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is drinking, but it is 
impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she must have either IV or 
sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined with the B-12) to start her 
eating again, it can be miraculous. If you don't want to try the Clavamox, 
then take her (what is her name?) in and request sub-q fluids (and have them 
show you how to do it at home) and ask about Convenia, a long-lasting 
injectable antibiotic. I don't generally recommend it, but it's better than 
nothing, and less stressful for both of you. Explain that medicating orally 
seems too stressful. You could ask about appetite stimulants, but they need 
to be given by mouth as well, so maybe you don't want to try. 
   Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's and 
assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time to give 
to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term care, get 
to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY for sub-q or 
IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most Vets will allow 
drop-off. 
   Please help her by getting the dehydration resolved. 
She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or move. At least 
she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course you elect to 
follow.
All the best,
Margo
-Original Message- 
From: Jennifer Ballew 
Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM 
To: felvtalk 
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(  


They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any outward 
signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if she's 
going to be able to pull out of this.  :-(
Jennifer
On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she 
have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the 
cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and 
fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his 
back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a 
non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and going 
strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use up the 
last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple but 
cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and your 
brain cells on high alert.

Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

Sent from my iPod

On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hey all-


 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV 
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never 
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently 
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just 
 within the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating 
 (and only drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she 
 seems very unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they 
 checked her blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were 
 elevated.  They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably 
 related to possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took 
 her home.  I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her 
 through any unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful 
 procedures and that I would

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread Katherine K.
I agree with Lee. A few spoonfuls of pate are not enough if she has stopped
eating. She should probably be getting about 1 can per day. Hills AD is
very soft, I don't even mix it up with water. Ask the vet to give you some
syringes that arent too narrow of an opening. I use the 10mL (aka 10cc)
ones, fill several up at a time, then just start with the feeding,
squirting 1 cc on the side of the tongue at a time. There can be some messy
trial and error at first.  How is she doing today?


On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 8:18 AM, Lee Evans moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Using a feeding syringe (3cc syringe) is better than stuffing pate in her
 mouth. You have to blend the pate with some soup (not with onion though)
 until it's like very thick cream and give her about a half syringe at a
 time. Towel on lap, tissue box nearby at hand, cat on lap, soft loving talk
 to cat, syringe at corner of mouth is how I syringe feed my cats during
 illness. Be sure to wipe her mouth frequently and do the feeding slowly. It
 may take almost a half hour but if you do it with loving murmurs, she will
 feel that she is spending quality time with you instead of having food
 stuffed into her mouth. Feeding tubes are invasive and uncomfortable for
 cats and should be a last resort. I usually use Hills A/D as it's a very
 soft pate made for syringe feeding ill cats. You buy it at the vet clinic.
 Get about 5 cans as you will be throwing away left overs that have already
 been blended. Try to get a half a can at a time into her. Once you syringe
 feed for a short time, their regular appetite takes over. Also, I would
 recommend you ask your vet about a antibiotic injection instead of pills or
 liquid.



   On Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:01 AM, Margo 
 toomanykitti...@earthlink.net wrote:



 Hi Jennifer,
Well, I think she will need some help. I am
 surprised that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing
 something about it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is
 drinking, but it is impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she
 must have either IV or sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined
 with the B-12) to start her eating again, it can be miraculous. If you
 don't want to try the Clavamox, then take her (what is her name?) in and
 request sub-q fluids (and have them show you how to do it at home) and
 ask about Convenia, a long-lasting injectable antibiotic. I don't generally
 recommend it, but it's better than nothing, and less stressful for both of
 you. Explain that medicating orally seems too stressful. You could ask
 about appetite stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as well, so
 maybe you don't want to try.
Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's and
 assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time to
 give to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term
 care, get to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY
 for sub-q or IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most
 Vets will allow drop-off.
Please help her by getting the dehydration
 resolved. She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or
 move. At least she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course
 you elect to follow.
 All the best,
 Margo
 -Original Message-
 From: Jennifer Ballew
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM
 To: felvtalk
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

 They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any outward
 signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if she's
 going to be able to pull out of this.  :-(
 Jennifer
 On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she
 have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the
 cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and
 fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his
 back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a
 non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and
 going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use
 up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple
 but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and
 your brain cells on high alert.

 Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

 Sent from my iPod

 On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

  Hey all-
 
 
  This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread Avaykn
Hi,
I'm keeping you her in my prayers.
You are getting some very good advice here but the main thing is to get her 
hydrated right now.


Sent from my iPhone.

 On Oct 10, 2013, at 8:46, Katherine K. kaths...@gmail.com wrote:
 
 I agree with Lee. A few spoonfuls of pate are not enough if she has stopped 
 eating. She should probably be getting about 1 can per day. Hills AD is very 
 soft, I don't even mix it up with water. Ask the vet to give you some 
 syringes that arent too narrow of an opening. I use the 10mL (aka 10cc) ones, 
 fill several up at a time, then just start with the feeding, squirting 1 cc 
 on the side of the tongue at a time. There can be some messy trial and error 
 at first.  How is she doing today?
 
 
 On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 8:18 AM, Lee Evans moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:
 Using a feeding syringe (3cc syringe) is better than stuffing pate in her 
 mouth. You have to blend the pate with some soup (not with onion though) 
 until it's like very thick cream and give her about a half syringe at a 
 time. Towel on lap, tissue box nearby at hand, cat on lap, soft loving talk 
 to cat, syringe at corner of mouth is how I syringe feed my cats during 
 illness. Be sure to wipe her mouth frequently and do the feeding slowly. It 
 may take almost a half hour but if you do it with loving murmurs, she will 
 feel that she is spending quality time with you instead of having food 
 stuffed into her mouth. Feeding tubes are invasive and uncomfortable for 
 cats and should be a last resort. I usually use Hills A/D as it's a very 
 soft pate made for syringe feeding ill cats. You buy it at the vet clinic. 
 Get about 5 cans as you will be throwing away left overs that have already 
 been blended. Try to get a half a can at a time into her. Once you syringe 
 feed for a short time, their regular appetite takes over. Also, I would 
 recommend you ask your vet about a antibiotic injection instead of pills or 
 liquid.
 
 
 
 On Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:01 AM, Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net 
 wrote:
  
  
 Hi Jennifer,
Well, I think she will need some help. I am surprised 
 that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing something about 
 it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is drinking, but it is 
 impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she must have either IV 
 or sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined with the B-12) to start 
 her eating again, it can be miraculous. If you don't want to try the 
 Clavamox, then take her (what is her name?) in and request sub-q fluids (and 
 have them show you how to do it at home) and ask about Convenia, a 
 long-lasting injectable antibiotic. I don't generally recommend it, but it's 
 better than nothing, and less stressful for both of you. Explain that 
 medicating orally seems too stressful. You could ask about appetite 
 stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as well, so maybe you don't 
 want to try.
Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's and 
 assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time to 
 give to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term 
 care, get to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY 
 for sub-q or IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most 
 Vets will allow drop-off.
Please help her by getting the dehydration resolved. 
 She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or move. At 
 least she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course you elect 
 to follow.
 All the best,
 Margo
 -Original Message- 
 From: Jennifer Ballew 
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM 
 To: felvtalk 
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(  
 
 They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any outward 
 signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if she's 
 going to be able to pull out of this.  :-(
 Jennifer
 On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:
 Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she 
 have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the 
 cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and 
 fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his 
 back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a 
 non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and 
 going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use 
 up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple 
 but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and 
 your brain cells on high alert.
 
 Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.
 
 Sent from my iPod
 
 On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:
 
  Hey all-
 
 
  This is the first time

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread trustinhim13

Jennifer,
 My Pookie was diagnosed when he was 2 years old, and the virus showed 
up after I had him neutered. I took him to a vet who told me his blood 
count was 4.5, that it was in his bone marrow, and he would not live out 
the week. Unable to stand, I brought him home and nourished him the best 
I could. The vet gave me a huge bottle of amoxicillan and basically said 
good luck. I fed him broth through a syringe. Pushed vitamins (Petinic), 
water,  DMG, etc. He recovered. My miracle boy. He is still with me at 
age 6 1/2. Praise God! Don't give up. I have had great results with a 
holistic vet and accupuncture this summer. He had a fare up. I don't 
know how it works but it does. I also give him Wei Qi (way chee) a herb 
that helps his immune system. Better than DMG which is for humans. I 
found he wasn't eating becasue he had a sore in his mouth. Sometimes the 
vets won't check for a sore in the mouth. They won't eat or drink if it 
hurts. ClinDrops (clindamycin) worked for that.  I will be praying for 
you. Carolyn


On Wed, Oct 9, 2013 at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew wrote:


Hey all-


This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has 
never
had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only 
recently
started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just 
within
the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and 
only

drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked 
her

blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably 
related to
possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her 
home.

I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and 
that I
would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while 
she was
alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if 
any
of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to 
pull out
of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left. 
I'm
sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the 
most
risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to 
live
a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or 
information

I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks all,

Jennifer

--
To love is to risk not being loved in return.
To hope is to risk pain.
To try is to risk failure,
But risk must be taken,
Because the greatest hazard in life
Is to risk nothing.
--Leo Buscaglia


 --

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


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Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread trustinhim13
And always use a syringe with a lot of liquid to the food. They will 
fight you, but anything you can get down is a plus. I used baby food 
mixed with non-flavored Pedialyte. Put her in her own room, on a bed 
away from the others. Go in every two hours to feed her some fluids.



On Wed, Oct 9, 2013 at 6:06 PM, katskat1 wrote:

Good info Margo.  You definitely have to hydrate and keep hydrating 
quickly
Jennifer and force feed if necessary.  Keep Amoxcillan (sp) on hand at 
the
very least but I suggest talk to your vet and buy/keep several 
different
types on hand with his/her help on determining which to start and 
when.

 Good luck.

On Wednesday, October 9, 2013, Margo wrote:


 Hi Jennifer,

My first thought is to get her immediately on sub-q
fluids, and join the yahoo CRF list
http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Feline-CRF-Support/info .

 If you think about what a hangover feels like (or 
have
someone who has over-imbibed explain the feeling) then you understand 
how
dehydration makes her feel. Can you be a bit more specific about her 
blood
counts? Is she anemic? Are her white cells low? What else is out of 
whack?


  Not everything that happens to an FeLV cat is FeLV
related, but we do have to react faster, as they can't fight of even 
minor

illness like a non-FeLV cat can. My + cats are on Interferon and DMG,
probably for the duration. Anything else that pops up we treat very
aggressively, and I have antibiotics on hand, which I often start 
even

before we get to the Vet, with her blessing.

   Jennifer, it's unlikely she'll come out of it by
herself. Just resolving the dehydration may be key to getting her 
going
again, it can make a HUGE difference. I'd ask the Vet if it's 
possible that
she has an infection that might be causing some of this with her 
kidneys,

and if an antibiotic could be tried.

I watch my positives carefully. When Gribble was 
first
diagnosed, I was sure I would lose him. He had a fever of 107, which 
we
brought down with ice and ketoprofen, and then his temp went down to 
97. I
did not expect him to live thru the night, so sat with him and moved 
him
between bags of frozen veggies and a heating pad. He was about 2 at 
that

time, early March of last year. He was assist fed, on two antibiotics
(there wasn't time for a CS) and started on Interferon ASAP. You 
might
consider Immunoregulin, we bought it, but it's still on hold in case 
he
relapses and doesn't respond to anything else. Mako also occasionally 
has
some issues, and we treat with antibiotics and/or antivirals. The 
truth is
that I don;t know if they get better because of that, or in spite of 
my

efforts.

 My advice would be to try to resolve the 
dehydration,

get some food into her, and request an antibiotic from the Vet (I use
Zenequin, but others might be more appropriate). Keep her warm and 
quiet,

and love her.

All the best,

Margo



-Original Message-
From: Jennifer Ballew **
Sent: Oct 9, 2013 4:48 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org javascript:_e({}, 'cvml',
'felvtalk@felineleukemia.org');
Subject: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

Hey all-


This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has 
never
had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only 
recently
started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just 
within
the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and 
only
drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems 
very
unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked 
her
blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were 
elevated.
They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably 
related to
possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her 
home.

I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and 
that I
would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while 
she was
alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if 
any
of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to 
pull out
of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left. 
I'm
sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the 
most
risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on 
to live
a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or 
information

I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks all,

Jennifer

--
To love is to risk not being loved in return.
To hope is to risk pain.
To try is to risk failure,
But risk must be taken,
Because the greatest hazard in life
Is to risk nothing.
--Leo Buscaglia





 --


Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread cerwin
At the Shelter where I volunteer, they find that rehydrating a
cat by giving sub-q usually perks up their appetite.

Chris C.


From: Margo 
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:00 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(





  Hi Jennifer,

 Well, I think she will need some help. I am surprised 
that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing something about it, 
so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is drinking, but it is impossible 
to correct clinical dehydration orally, she must have either IV or sub-q 
fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined with the B-12) to start her eating 
again, it can be miraculous. If you don't want to try the Clavamox, then take 
her (what is her name?) in and request sub-q fluids (and have them show you how 
to do it at home) and ask about Convenia, a long-lasting injectable antibiotic. 
I don't generally recommend it, but it's better than nothing, and less 
stressful for both of you. Explain that medicating orally seems too stressful. 
You could ask about appetite stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as 
well, so maybe you don't want to try. 

 Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's and 
assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time to give 
to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term care, get to 
the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY for sub-q or IV 
fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most Vets will allow 
drop-off. 

 Please help her by getting the dehydration resolved. 
She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or move. At least 
she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course you elect to follow.

  All the best,

  Margo

  -Original Message- 
  From: Jennifer Ballew 
  Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM 
  To: felvtalk 
  Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(  



  They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any outward 
signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if she's going 
to be able to pull out of this.  :-(

  Jennifer

  On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she 
have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the 
cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and 
fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his 
back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a 
non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and going 
strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use up the 
last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple but 
cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and your 
brain cells on high alert.

Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

Sent from my iPod

On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hey all-


 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV 
positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never had 
any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently started 
showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within the last 
few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only drinks a small 
amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very unsteady and wobbly.  I 
took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her blood counts which were low and 
said her kidney enzymes were elevated.  They also said they could hear a heart 
murmur which is probably related to possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a 
B12 shot and I took her home.  I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't 
put her through any unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful 
procedures and that I would strive only to provide the best supportive care for 
her while she was alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just 
wondering if any of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect 
her to pull out of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have 
left.  I'm sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through 
the most risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to 
live a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information 
I would greatly appreciate it.

 Thanks all,

 Jennifer

 --
 To love is to risk not being loved in return.
 To hope is to risk pain.
 To try is to risk failure,
 But risk must be taken,
 Because the greatest hazard in life
 Is to risk nothing.
 --Leo Buscaglia

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread katskat1
Sub Q will work almost immediately if anything is going to work at all.
Don't freak tho.  It will show as a big scary malleable lump under the skin
as the liquid drains from the IV bag.  It is just the water under the skin
and will dissipate within a short period of time but the rehydration starts
surprisingly quickly and can make an almost immediate world of difference.
Please don't hesitate.  It is the best and quickest way to give your kitty
a chance.

Kat


On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 2:57 PM, cer...@new.rr.com wrote:

   At the Shelter where I volunteer, they find that rehydrating a
 cat by giving sub-q usually perks up their appetite.

 Chris C.


  *From:* Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net
 *Sent:* Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:00 AM
 *To:* felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 *Subject:* Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(






 Hi Jennifer,

Well, I think she will need some help. I am
 surprised that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing
 something about it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is
 drinking, but it is impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she
 must have either IV or sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined
 with the B-12) to start her eating again, it can be miraculous. If you
 don't want to try the Clavamox, then take her (what is her name?) in and
 request sub-q fluids (and have them show you how to do it at home) and ask
 about Convenia, a long-lasting injectable antibiotic. I don't generally
 recommend it, but it's better than nothing, and less stressful for both of
 you. Explain that medicating orally seems too stressful. You could ask
 about appetite stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as well, so
 maybe you don't want to try.

Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's and
 assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time to
 give to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term
 care, get to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY
 for sub-q or IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most
 Vets will allow drop-off.

Please help her by getting the dehydration
 resolved. She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or
 move. At least she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course
 you elect to follow.

 All the best,

 Margo

 -Original Message-
 From: Jennifer Ballew **
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM
 To: felvtalk **
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

 They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any outward
 signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if she's
 going to be able to pull out of this.  :-(

 Jennifer
 On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she
 have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the
 cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and
 fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his
 back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a
 non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and
 going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use
 up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple
 but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and
 your brain cells on high alert.

 Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

 Sent from my iPod

 On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

  Hey all-
 
 
  This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
 They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
 I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I
 would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was
 alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any
 of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out
 of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm
 sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread Jennifer Ballew
Put Sasha down today.  I think it was time.  :-(
 On Oct 10, 2013 2:02 PM, katskat1 katsk...@gmail.com wrote:

 Sub Q will work almost immediately if anything is going to work at all.
 Don't freak tho.  It will show as a big scary malleable lump under the skin
 as the liquid drains from the IV bag.  It is just the water under the skin
 and will dissipate within a short period of time but the rehydration starts
 surprisingly quickly and can make an almost immediate world of difference.
 Please don't hesitate.  It is the best and quickest way to give your kitty
 a chance.

 Kat


 On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 2:57 PM, cer...@new.rr.com wrote:

   At the Shelter where I volunteer, they find that rehydrating a
 cat by giving sub-q usually perks up their appetite.

 Chris C.


  *From:* Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net
 *Sent:* Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:00 AM
 *To:* felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 *Subject:* Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(






 Hi Jennifer,

Well, I think she will need some help. I am
 surprised that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing
 something about it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is
 drinking, but it is impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she
 must have either IV or sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined
 with the B-12) to start her eating again, it can be miraculous. If you
 don't want to try the Clavamox, then take her (what is her name?) in and
 request sub-q fluids (and have them show you how to do it at home) and ask
 about Convenia, a long-lasting injectable antibiotic. I don't generally
 recommend it, but it's better than nothing, and less stressful for both of
 you. Explain that medicating orally seems too stressful. You could ask
 about appetite stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as well, so
 maybe you don't want to try.

Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's
 and assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time
 to give to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term
 care, get to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY
 for sub-q or IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most
 Vets will allow drop-off.

Please help her by getting the dehydration
 resolved. She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or
 move. At least she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course
 you elect to follow.

 All the best,

 Margo

 -Original Message-
 From: Jennifer Ballew **
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM
 To: felvtalk **
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

 They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any outward
 signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if she's
 going to be able to pull out of this.  :-(

 Jennifer
 On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does
 she have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking
 the cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard
 and fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on
 his back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it
 was a non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat
 and going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will
 use up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off
 simple but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears
 open and your brain cells on high alert.

 Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

 Sent from my iPod

 On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

  Hey all-
 
 
  This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
 They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
 I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I
 would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was
 alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any
 of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread Katherine K.
I am so sorry to hear about Sasha, Jennifer. May you find comfort and peace
knowing she had a good life thanks to you. I'm keeping you and your other
kitty in my thoughts.


On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 4:17 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

 Put Sasha down today.  I think it was time.  :-(
  On Oct 10, 2013 2:02 PM, katskat1 katsk...@gmail.com wrote:

 Sub Q will work almost immediately if anything is going to work at all.
 Don't freak tho.  It will show as a big scary malleable lump under the skin
 as the liquid drains from the IV bag.  It is just the water under the skin
 and will dissipate within a short period of time but the rehydration starts
 surprisingly quickly and can make an almost immediate world of difference.
 Please don't hesitate.  It is the best and quickest way to give your kitty
 a chance.

 Kat


 On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 2:57 PM, cer...@new.rr.com wrote:

   At the Shelter where I volunteer, they find that rehydrating a
 cat by giving sub-q usually perks up their appetite.

 Chris C.


  *From:* Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net
 *Sent:* Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:00 AM
 *To:* felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 *Subject:* Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(






 Hi Jennifer,

Well, I think she will need some help. I am
 surprised that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing
 something about it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is
 drinking, but it is impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she
 must have either IV or sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined
 with the B-12) to start her eating again, it can be miraculous. If you
 don't want to try the Clavamox, then take her (what is her name?) in and
 request sub-q fluids (and have them show you how to do it at home) and ask
 about Convenia, a long-lasting injectable antibiotic. I don't generally
 recommend it, but it's better than nothing, and less stressful for both of
 you. Explain that medicating orally seems too stressful. You could ask
 about appetite stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as well, so
 maybe you don't want to try.

Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's
 and assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time
 to give to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term
 care, get to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY
 for sub-q or IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most
 Vets will allow drop-off.

Please help her by getting the dehydration
 resolved. She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or
 move. At least she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course
 you elect to follow.

 All the best,

 Margo

 -Original Message-
 From: Jennifer Ballew **
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM
 To: felvtalk **
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

 They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any
 outward signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if
 she's going to be able to pull out of this.  :-(

 Jennifer
 On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does
 she have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking
 the cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard
 and fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on
 his back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it
 was a non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat
 and going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will
 use up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off
 simple but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears
 open and your brain cells on high alert.

 Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

 Sent from my iPod

 On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

  Hey all-
 
 
  This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
 They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
 I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-10 Thread Margo



wow.

-Original Message- From: Jennifer Ballew <balle...@gmail.com>Sent: Oct 10, 2013 4:17 PM To: felvtalk <FELVTALK@FELINELEUKEMIA.ORG>Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-( 
Put Sasha down today. I think it was time. :-(
On Oct 10, 2013 2:02 PM, "katskat1" katsk...@gmail.com wrote:


Sub Q will work almost immediately if anything is going to work at all. Don't freak tho. It will show as a big scary malleable lump under the skin as the liquid drains from the IV bag. It is just the water under the skin and will dissipate within a short period of time but the rehydration starts surprisingly quickly and can make an almost immediate world of difference. Please don't hesitate. It is the best and quickest way to give your kitty a chance.

Kat

On Thu, Oct 10, 2013 at 2:57 PM, cer...@new.rr.com wrote:




At the Shelter where I volunteer, they find that rehydrating a
cat by giving sub-q usually perks up their appetite.

Chris C.





From: Margo 
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:00 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(





Hi Jennifer,
 Well, I think she will need some help. I am surprised that a Vet allowed a dehydrated cat to leave without doing something about it, so I'd call and ask why. It's good that she is drinking, but it is impossible to correct clinical dehydration orally, she must have either IV or sub-q fluids. That alone MAY be enough (combined with the B-12) to start her eating again, it can be miraculous. If you don't want to try the Clavamox, then take her (what is her name?) in and request sub-q fluids (and have them show you how to do it at home) and ask about Convenia, a long-lasting injectable antibiotic. I don't generally recommend it, but it's better than nothing, and less stressful for both of you. Explain that medicating orally seems too stressful. You could ask about appetite stimulants, but they need to be given by mouth as well, so maybe you don't want to try. 
 Much depends on how far you want to go. Sub-q's and assist feedings aren't difficult to do, but you may not have the time to give to this. I would say, even if you decide not to continue long-term care, get to the Vet (or another of you don't want to go back there) TODAY for sub-q or IV fluids, and see if that helps.. If you have to work, most Vets will allow drop-off. 
 Please help her by getting the dehydration resolved. She feels totally lousy, and of course doesn't want to eat, or move. At least she will feel better, and that's critical, whatever course you elect to follow.
All the best,
Margo
-Original Message- From: Jennifer Ballew Sent: Oct 9, 2013 9:40 PM To: felvtalk Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-( 
They took her temp yesterday and no fever. She's not showing any outward signs of infection, so that's good I guess. I'm just wondering if she's going to be able to pull out of this. :-(
Jennifer
On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, "moonsister22" moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:
Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and fast rule is to think "simple" first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and your brain cells on high alert.Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.Sent from my iPodOn Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote: Hey all- This is the first time I have posted to the forum. I have two FeLV positive cats, one two and one three years old. The older cat has never had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her. Just within the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very unsteady and wobbly. I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated. They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to possibly being dehydrated. They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home. I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was alive so that she would have the best chances. I'm just wondering if any of you have gone through the same

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread Katherine K.
Hi Jennifer,

Sorry to hear about your kitty. Has she had the virus since she was a
kitten? Are you assist feeding her? I nursed my 10 year old out of a slump
this summer (when I first found out he was pos) with sub-q fluids, assist
feeding, low dose of prednisone and t-cyte injections. Just do what you're
comfortable with, knowing you're doing all that you can for her. Some
resources that I've found to be helpful:
http://910pets.com/forum/topics/feline-leukemia and
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-Assisted-Feeding/.

Hang in there.
Katherine


On Wed, Oct 9, 2013 at 4:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hey all-


 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
 They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
 I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I
 would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was
 alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any
 of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out
 of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm
 sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the most
 risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live
 a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information
 I would greatly appreciate it.

 Thanks all,

 Jennifer

 --
 To love is to risk not being loved in return.
 To hope is to risk pain.
 To try is to risk failure,
 But risk must be taken,
 Because the greatest hazard in life
 Is to risk nothing.
 --Leo Buscaglia

 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread Jennifer Ballew
Her Hgb was 8.3 if I remember correctly, not too bad, but not great.  I
believe they said her WBCs were low, but I didn't get the exact number.  So
I just tried finger feeding her some pate food and when I put it on her
tongue she seized up (seizure?) and practically become unresponsive for
about a minute or so.  I about freaked out.  Now I'm a mess...  She's back
to how she was before I tried to feed her, but now I'm scared to death to
do anything.  They did give me some Clovamax antibiotics yesterday to try
on her, but I'm afraid she'll seize up if I try forcing anything down her.
I guess the feeding tube might be the only way now, but I know those can be
costly and I don't have the money for it.  :-(

Jen


On Wed, Oct 9, 2013 at 4:30 PM, Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net wrote:

  Hi Jennifer,

 My first thought is to get her immediately on sub-q
 fluids, and join the yahoo CRF list
 http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Feline-CRF-Support/info .

  If you think about what a hangover feels like (or have
 someone who has over-imbibed explain the feeling) then you understand how
 dehydration makes her feel. Can you be a bit more specific about her blood
 counts? Is she anemic? Are her white cells low? What else is out of whack?

   Not everything that happens to an FeLV cat is FeLV
 related, but we do have to react faster, as they can't fight of even minor
 illness like a non-FeLV cat can. My + cats are on Interferon and DMG,
 probably for the duration. Anything else that pops up we treat very
 aggressively, and I have antibiotics on hand, which I often start even
 before we get to the Vet, with her blessing.

Jennifer, it's unlikely she'll come out of it by
 herself. Just resolving the dehydration may be key to getting her going
 again, it can make a HUGE difference. I'd ask the Vet if it's possible that
 she has an infection that might be causing some of this with her kidneys,
 and if an antibiotic could be tried.

 I watch my positives carefully. When Gribble was first
 diagnosed, I was sure I would lose him. He had a fever of 107, which we
 brought down with ice and ketoprofen, and then his temp went down to 97. I
 did not expect him to live thru the night, so sat with him and moved him
 between bags of frozen veggies and a heating pad. He was about 2 at that
 time, early March of last year. He was assist fed, on two antibiotics
 (there wasn't time for a CS) and started on Interferon ASAP. You might
 consider Immunoregulin, we bought it, but it's still on hold in case he
 relapses and doesn't respond to anything else. Mako also occasionally has
 some issues, and we treat with antibiotics and/or antivirals. The truth is
 that I don;t know if they get better because of that, or in spite of my
 efforts.

  My advice would be to try to resolve the dehydration,
 get some food into her, and request an antibiotic from the Vet (I use
 Zenequin, but others might be more appropriate). Keep her warm and quiet,
 and love her.

 All the best,

 Margo



 -Original Message-
 From: Jennifer Ballew **
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 4:48 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

 Hey all-


 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
 They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
 I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I
 would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was
 alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any
 of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out
 of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm
 sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the most
 risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live
 a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information
 I would greatly appreciate it.

 Thanks all,

 Jennifer

 --
 To love is to risk not being loved in return.
 To hope is to risk pain.
 To try is to risk failure,
 But risk must be taken,
 Because the greatest hazard in life
 Is to risk nothing.
 --Leo Buscaglia


 

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread Lauren Carlisle
Jennifer I'm literally going through the SAME thing. My 2.5 yo male was 
recently diagnosed as being FeLV+ and I was devastated. He was also diagnosed 
with a light heart murmur. He's on Prednisone .5 twice a day, 0.5 ml (50mg/ml) 
Doxycycline 2x day, Lysine (not so much bc he hates it), and 0.5 ml VitaDrops 
2x day. He has an enlarged spleen and gets a fever fairly often. My other 3 
tested negative. Go figure. 

Please keep emailing this group as I'm sure any questions you have will be 
something I'm wondering too and if you ever need anything just ask! 

I'm sure your baby is in good hands, you sound like you know what you're 
talking about! 


Sent from my iPhone

 On Oct 9, 2013, at 4:05 PM, Katherine K. kaths...@gmail.com wrote:
 
 Hi Jennifer,
 
 Sorry to hear about your kitty. Has she had the virus since she was a kitten? 
 Are you assist feeding her? I nursed my 10 year old out of a slump this 
 summer (when I first found out he was pos) with sub-q fluids, assist feeding, 
 low dose of prednisone and t-cyte injections. Just do what you're comfortable 
 with, knowing you're doing all that you can for her. Some resources that I've 
 found to be helpful: http://910pets.com/forum/topics/feline-leukemia and 
 http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-Assisted-Feeding/. 
 
 Hang in there.
 Katherine
 
 
 On Wed, Oct 9, 2013 at 4:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:
 Hey all-
 
 
 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV positive 
 cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never had any 
 issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently started 
 showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within the last 
 few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only drinks a 
 small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very unsteady and 
 wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her blood counts 
 which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.  They also said 
 they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to possibly being 
 dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.  I already said 
 if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any unnecessary treatments 
 or subject her to any painful procedures and that I would strive only to 
 provide the best supportive care for her while she was alive so that she 
 would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any of you have gone 
 through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out of this on her 
 own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm sincerely 
 heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the most risky part 
 of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live a halfway 
 long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information I would 
 greatly appreciate it.
 
 Thanks all,
 
 Jennifer
 
 -- 
 To love is to risk not being loved in return.
 To hope is to risk pain. 
 To try is to risk failure, 
 But risk must be taken,
 Because the greatest hazard in life
 Is to risk nothing.
 --Leo Buscaglia
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
 
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread Lauren Carlisle
Jen is there a college near you? What state are you in? I work at an animal 
rescue and if I were you I would call them and explain your situation. They may 
be able to get you at least a discount at the vet because they often have great 
relationships with them. Also there's a website with a list of groups to help 
with vet bills.  

Sent from my iPhone

 On Oct 9, 2013, at 4:36 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:
 
 Her Hgb was 8.3 if I remember correctly, not too bad, but not great.  I 
 believe they said her WBCs were low, but I didn't get the exact number.  So I 
 just tried finger feeding her some pate food and when I put it on her tongue 
 she seized up (seizure?) and practically become unresponsive for about a 
 minute or so.  I about freaked out.  Now I'm a mess...  She's back to how she 
 was before I tried to feed her, but now I'm scared to death to do anything.  
 They did give me some Clovamax antibiotics yesterday to try on her, but I'm 
 afraid she'll seize up if I try forcing anything down her.  I guess the 
 feeding tube might be the only way now, but I know those can be costly and I 
 don't have the money for it.  :-(
 
 Jen
 
 
 On Wed, Oct 9, 2013 at 4:30 PM, Margo toomanykitti...@earthlink.net wrote:
 Hi Jennifer,
 
 My first thought is to get her immediately on sub-q fluids, 
 and join the yahoo CRF list 
 http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Feline-CRF-Support/info .
 
  If you think about what a hangover feels like (or have 
 someone who has over-imbibed explain the feeling) then you understand how 
 dehydration makes her feel. Can you be a bit more specific about her blood 
 counts? Is she anemic? Are her white cells low? What else is out of whack?
 
   Not everything that happens to an FeLV cat is FeLV 
 related, but we do have to react faster, as they can't fight of even minor 
 illness like a non-FeLV cat can. My + cats are on Interferon and DMG, 
 probably for the duration. Anything else that pops up we treat very 
 aggressively, and I have antibiotics on hand, which I often start even 
 before we get to the Vet, with her blessing.
 
Jennifer, it's unlikely she'll come out of it by herself. 
 Just resolving the dehydration may be key to getting her going again, it can 
 make a HUGE difference. I'd ask the Vet if it's possible that she has an 
 infection that might be causing some of this with her kidneys, and if an 
 antibiotic could be tried.
 
 I watch my positives carefully. When Gribble was first 
 diagnosed, I was sure I would lose him. He had a fever of 107, which we 
 brought down with ice and ketoprofen, and then his temp went down to 97. I 
 did not expect him to live thru the night, so sat with him and moved him 
 between bags of frozen veggies and a heating pad. He was about 2 at that 
 time, early March of last year. He was assist fed, on two antibiotics (there 
 wasn't time for a CS) and started on Interferon ASAP. You might consider 
 Immunoregulin, we bought it, but it's still on hold in case he relapses and 
 doesn't respond to anything else. Mako also occasionally has some issues, 
 and we treat with antibiotics and/or antivirals. The truth is that I don;t 
 know if they get better because of that, or in spite of my efforts.
 
  My advice would be to try to resolve the dehydration, 
 get some food into her, and request an antibiotic from the Vet (I use 
 Zenequin, but others might be more appropriate). Keep her warm and quiet, 
 and love her.
 
 All the best,
 
 Margo
 
  
 
 -Original Message- 
 From: Jennifer Ballew 
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 4:48 PM 
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-( 
 
 
 Hey all-
 
 
 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV positive 
 cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never had any 
 issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently started 
 showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within the last 
 few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only drinks a 
 small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very unsteady and 
 wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her blood counts 
 which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.  They also said 
 they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to possibly being 
 dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.  I already said 
 if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any unnecessary treatments 
 or subject her to any painful procedures and that I would strive only to 
 provide the best supportive care for her while she was alive so that she 
 would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any of you have gone 
 through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out of this on her 
 own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have 

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread Sharyl
You have already gotten some good advise.  Assist feeding is critical if she is 
going to have the strength to fight through this slump.  Otherwise she'll 
starve to death.  Here is the link to the Yahoo assist feeding group.
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-Assisted-Feeding/
 
Dehydrated cats feel lousy.  It is easy to give sub q fluids at home.  Here is 
the link to the site I used to learn how to give sub q fluids
Sophia 
Gets Her Subcutaneous (Sub Q) Fluids 
http://www.tinyurl.com/63max
 
I just saw your post where she froze when you tried to finger feed her.  Maybe 
you were giving her too much food.  I use syringes and only give 1/2 cc of food 
at a time.
 
 And sometime there is nothing else you can do
Sharyl



On Wednesday, October 9, 2013 5:06 PM, Katherine K. kaths...@gmail.com wrote:
  
Hi Jennifer,

Sorry to hear about your kitty. Has she had the virus since she was a kitten? 
Are you assist
 feeding her? I nursed my 10 year old out of a slump this summer (when I first 
found out he was pos) with sub-q fluids, assist feeding, low dose of prednisone 
and t-cyte injections. Just do what you're comfortable with, knowing you're 
doing all that you can for her. Some resources that I've found to be helpful: 
http://910pets.com/forum/topics/feline-leukemia and 
http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/Feline-Assisted-Feeding/. 

Hang in there.
Katherine




On Wed, Oct 9, 2013 at 4:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

Hey all-




This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV positive 
cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never had any issues 
with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently started showing 
signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within the last few days 
she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only drinks a small amount) 
and whenever she stands or walks she seems very unsteady and wobbly.  I took 
her to the vet yesterday; they checked her blood counts which were low and 
said her kidney enzymes were elevated.  They also said they could hear a heart 
murmur which is probably related to possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her 
a B12 shot and I took her home.  I already said if worst came to worst I 
wouldn't put her through any unnecessary treatments or subject her to any 
painful procedures and that I would strive only to provide the best supportive 
care for her while she was alive so
 that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any of you have 
gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out of this on her 
own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm sincerely 
heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the most risky part of 
her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live a halfway long 
life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information I would greatly 
appreciate it.

Thanks all,

Jennifer

-- 
To love is to risk not being loved in return.
To hope is to risk pain. 
To try is to risk failure, 
But risk must be taken,
Because the greatest hazard in life
Is to risk nothing.
--Leo Buscaglia  
___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org




___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread katskat1
Good info Margo.  You definitely have to hydrate and keep hydrating quickly
Jennifer and force feed if necessary.  Keep Amoxcillan (sp) on hand at the
very least but I suggest talk to your vet and buy/keep several different
types on hand with his/her help on determining which to start and when.
 Good luck.

On Wednesday, October 9, 2013, Margo wrote:

  Hi Jennifer,

 My first thought is to get her immediately on sub-q
 fluids, and join the yahoo CRF list
 http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Feline-CRF-Support/info .

  If you think about what a hangover feels like (or have
 someone who has over-imbibed explain the feeling) then you understand how
 dehydration makes her feel. Can you be a bit more specific about her blood
 counts? Is she anemic? Are her white cells low? What else is out of whack?

   Not everything that happens to an FeLV cat is FeLV
 related, but we do have to react faster, as they can't fight of even minor
 illness like a non-FeLV cat can. My + cats are on Interferon and DMG,
 probably for the duration. Anything else that pops up we treat very
 aggressively, and I have antibiotics on hand, which I often start even
 before we get to the Vet, with her blessing.

Jennifer, it's unlikely she'll come out of it by
 herself. Just resolving the dehydration may be key to getting her going
 again, it can make a HUGE difference. I'd ask the Vet if it's possible that
 she has an infection that might be causing some of this with her kidneys,
 and if an antibiotic could be tried.

 I watch my positives carefully. When Gribble was first
 diagnosed, I was sure I would lose him. He had a fever of 107, which we
 brought down with ice and ketoprofen, and then his temp went down to 97. I
 did not expect him to live thru the night, so sat with him and moved him
 between bags of frozen veggies and a heating pad. He was about 2 at that
 time, early March of last year. He was assist fed, on two antibiotics
 (there wasn't time for a CS) and started on Interferon ASAP. You might
 consider Immunoregulin, we bought it, but it's still on hold in case he
 relapses and doesn't respond to anything else. Mako also occasionally has
 some issues, and we treat with antibiotics and/or antivirals. The truth is
 that I don;t know if they get better because of that, or in spite of my
 efforts.

  My advice would be to try to resolve the dehydration,
 get some food into her, and request an antibiotic from the Vet (I use
 Zenequin, but others might be more appropriate). Keep her warm and quiet,
 and love her.

 All the best,

 Margo



 -Original Message-
 From: Jennifer Ballew **
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 4:48 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org javascript:_e({}, 'cvml',
 'felvtalk@felineleukemia.org');
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

 Hey all-


 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
 They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
 I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I
 would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was
 alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any
 of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out
 of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm
 sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the most
 risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live
 a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information
 I would greatly appreciate it.

 Thanks all,

 Jennifer

 --
 To love is to risk not being loved in return.
 To hope is to risk pain.
 To try is to risk failure,
 But risk must be taken,
 Because the greatest hazard in life
 Is to risk nothing.
 --Leo Buscaglia


___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org


Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread katskat1
Rehydrate.  Soon.

On Wednesday, October 9, 2013, Jennifer Ballew wrote:

 Well she is still drinking water for now, albeit not very much.  So I
 guess that's something.

 Jennifer
 On Oct 9, 2013 6:07 PM, katskat1 katsk...@gmail.com javascript:_e({},
 'cvml', 'katsk...@gmail.com'); wrote:

 Good info Margo.  You definitely have to hydrate and keep hydrating
 quickly Jennifer and force feed if necessary.  Keep Amoxcillan (sp) on hand
 at the very least but I suggest talk to your vet and buy/keep several
 different types on hand with his/her help on determining which to start and
 when.  Good luck.

 On Wednesday, October 9, 2013, Margo wrote:

  Hi Jennifer,

 My first thought is to get her immediately on sub-q
 fluids, and join the yahoo CRF list
 http://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/Feline-CRF-Support/info .

  If you think about what a hangover feels like (or have
 someone who has over-imbibed explain the feeling) then you understand how
 dehydration makes her feel. Can you be a bit more specific about her blood
 counts? Is she anemic? Are her white cells low? What else is out of whack?

   Not everything that happens to an FeLV cat is FeLV
 related, but we do have to react faster, as they can't fight of even minor
 illness like a non-FeLV cat can. My + cats are on Interferon and DMG,
 probably for the duration. Anything else that pops up we treat very
 aggressively, and I have antibiotics on hand, which I often start even
 before we get to the Vet, with her blessing.

Jennifer, it's unlikely she'll come out of it by
 herself. Just resolving the dehydration may be key to getting her going
 again, it can make a HUGE difference. I'd ask the Vet if it's possible that
 she has an infection that might be causing some of this with her kidneys,
 and if an antibiotic could be tried.

 I watch my positives carefully. When Gribble was
 first diagnosed, I was sure I would lose him. He had a fever of 107, which
 we brought down with ice and ketoprofen, and then his temp went down to 97.
 I did not expect him to live thru the night, so sat with him and moved him
 between bags of frozen veggies and a heating pad. He was about 2 at that
 time, early March of last year. He was assist fed, on two antibiotics
 (there wasn't time for a CS) and started on Interferon ASAP. You might
 consider Immunoregulin, we bought it, but it's still on hold in case he
 relapses and doesn't respond to anything else. Mako also occasionally has
 some issues, and we treat with antibiotics and/or antivirals. The truth is
 that I don;t know if they get better because of that, or in spite of my
 efforts.

  My advice would be to try to resolve the
 dehydration, get some food into her, and request an antibiotic from the Vet
 (I use Zenequin, but others might be more appropriate). Keep her warm and
 quiet, and love her.

 All the best,

 Margo



 -Original Message-
 From: Jennifer Ballew **
 Sent: Oct 9, 2013 4:48 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

 Hey all-


 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
 They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
 I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I
 would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was
 alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any
 of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out
 of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm
 sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the most
 risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live
 a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information
 I would greatly appreciate it.

 Thanks all,

 Jennifer

 --
 To love is to risk not being loved in return.
 To hope is to risk pain.
 To try is to risk failure,
 But risk must be taken,
 Because the greatest hazard in life
 Is to risk nothing.
 --Leo Buscag

 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org javascript:_e({}, 'cvml',
 'Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org');
 

Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread moonsister22
Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she have 
a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the cat's 
temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and fast rule 
is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his back. It was 
diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a non-malignant 
fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and going strong and the 
tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use up the last of their nine 
lives eventually but until then start off simple but cautious and do always 
take to vet but listen with both ears open and your brain cells on high alert.

Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

Sent from my iPod

On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

 Hey all-
 
 
 This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV positive 
 cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never had any 
 issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently started 
 showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within the last 
 few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only drinks a 
 small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very unsteady and 
 wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her blood counts which 
 were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.  They also said they 
 could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to possibly being 
 dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.  I already said if 
 worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any unnecessary treatments or 
 subject her to any painful procedures and that I would strive only to provide 
 the best supportive care for her while she was alive so that she would have 
 the best chances.
   I'm just wondering if any of you have gone through the same thing and if I 
can expect her to pull out of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she 
might have left.  I'm sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her 
through the most risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now 
go on to live a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or 
information I would greatly appreciate it.
 
 Thanks all,
 
 Jennifer
 
 -- 
 To love is to risk not being loved in return.
 To hope is to risk pain. 
 To try is to risk failure, 
 But risk must be taken,
 Because the greatest hazard in life
 Is to risk nothing.
 --Leo Buscaglia
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org

___
Felvtalk mailing list
Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Fwd: virus has finally caught up with her :-(

2013-10-09 Thread Jennifer Ballew
They took her temp yesterday and no fever.  She's not showing any outward
signs of infection, so that's good I guess.  I'm just wondering if she's
going to be able to pull out of this.  :-(

Jennifer
On Oct 9, 2013 8:27 PM, moonsister22 moonsiste...@yahoo.com wrote:

 Regular cats can also have those symptoms. The B12 shot is good. Does she
 have a fever? Many doctors completely neglect the simple task of taking the
 cat's temperature. An antibiotic injection might be of benefit. My hard and
 fast rule is to think simple first. My FIV positive cat had a lump on his
 back. It was diagnosed as probably a malignant tumor. I suggested it was a
 non-malignant fatty tumor. Three years later Mr. Snowy is still fat and
 going strong and the tumor has absorbed. Maybe it's luck and they will use
 up the last of their nine lives eventually but until then start off simple
 but cautious and do always take to vet but listen with both ears open and
 your brain cells on high alert.

 Hugs and blessings to you and the fur kids.

 Sent from my iPod

 On Oct 9, 2013, at 3:48 PM, Jennifer Ballew balle...@gmail.com wrote:

  Hey all-
 
 
  This is the first time I have posted to the forum.  I have two FeLV
 positive cats, one two and one three years old.  The older cat has never
 had any issues with illness whatsoever, but the younger has only recently
 started showing signs that her illness has caught up with her.  Just within
 the last few days she has become very lethargic, stopped eating (and only
 drinks a small amount) and whenever she stands or walks she seems very
 unsteady and wobbly.  I took her to the vet yesterday; they checked her
 blood counts which were low and said her kidney enzymes were elevated.
  They also said they could hear a heart murmur which is probably related to
 possibly being dehydrated.  They gave her a B12 shot and I took her home.
  I already said if worst came to worst I wouldn't put her through any
 unnecessary treatments or subject her to any painful procedures and that I
 would strive only to provide the best supportive care for her while she was
 alive so that she would have the best chances.  I'm just wondering if any
 of you have gone through the same thing and if I can expect her to pull out
 of this on her own, or, if she doesn't, how long she might have left.  I'm
 sincerely heartbroken.  I really thought I had nursed her through the most
 risky part of her illness (kittenhood) and that she would now go on to live
 a halfway long life.  In any case, if anyone has any advice or information
 I would greatly appreciate it.
 
  Thanks all,
 
  Jennifer
 
  --
  To love is to risk not being loved in return.
  To hope is to risk pain.
  To try is to risk failure,
  But risk must be taken,
  Because the greatest hazard in life
  Is to risk nothing.
  --Leo Buscaglia
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