Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-19 Thread Maureen Olvey

I have been e-mailing with a vet friend and she says most researchers these 
days feel that adult cats are pretty well resistant to the disease, even if not 
vaccinated.  I bet Sugar will be fine.

I've just had 5 of my cats tested that are not vaccinated (think I already told 
you this) but lived with my FeLV + kitty for two years and those 5 are negative.

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain



 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 09:22:49 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 I always love to hear positive experiences with FeLV+ cats. I still hope 
 that mine will continue to test negative. May 9th can't get here soon enough 
 for me!
 - Original Message - 
 From: POTT, BEVERLY p...@mailbox.sc.edu
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 8:35 AM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
 I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
  other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
  contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
  also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
  4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.
 
  My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
  never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
  contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.
 
 
  -Original Message-
  From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net]
  Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
  test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
  gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
  even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
  general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
  same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging
  fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.
 
  But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
  living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
  cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
  spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
  nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
  ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.
 
  Has it been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
  she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
  her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
  positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
  who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
  HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
  understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
  fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
  think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
  positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
 
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-19 Thread Lynda Wilson
Maureen, this is so comforting! I'm waiting until May 9th (it will be his 
second test since exposure but only within 2 mos - my vet wants me to wait 3 
mos. before she thinks he is safe). I do understand that his chances of 
contracting it are a lot less than if he were a kitten. I'm so glad he is 2 
yrs old. He so misses his companion and longs for another. Another companion 
would keep him more active. He loved to be chased up and down the stairs and 
he no longer gets that exercise (he won't let me chase him, imagine that!). 
I'm still a little worried but not so much like I was.


Thanks for all the support from everyone and let's all still pray for Poppy 
:0)


Have a great week!
Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Tuesday, April 19, 2011 1:29 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



I have been e-mailing with a vet friend and she says most researchers these 
days feel that adult cats are pretty well resistant to the disease, even if 
not vaccinated.  I bet Sugar will be fine.


I've just had 5 of my cats tested that are not vaccinated (think I already 
told you this) but lived with my FeLV + kitty for two years and those 5 are 
negative.


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain





From: longhornf...@verizon.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Mon, 18 Apr 2011 09:22:49 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I always love to hear positive experiences with FeLV+ cats. I still hope
that mine will continue to test negative. May 9th can't get here soon 
enough

for me!
- Original Message - 
From: POTT, BEVERLY p...@mailbox.sc.edu

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 8:35 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
 other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
 contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
 also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
 4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.

 My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
 never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
 contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.


 -Original Message-
 From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net]
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
 test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
 gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
 even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
 general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
 same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging
 fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.

 But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
 living together, not separate. Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
 cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
 spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
 nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
 ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.

 Has it been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
 she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
 her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
 positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
 who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
 HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
 understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
 fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
 think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
 positive.

 Can anyone help me sort this out?

 Pam



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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-18 Thread POTT, BEVERLY
I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.

My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.


-Original Message-
From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net] 
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.

But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.

Has it been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam



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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-18 Thread Lynda Wilson
I always love to hear positive experiences with FeLV+ cats. I still hope 
that mine will continue to test negative. May 9th can't get here soon enough 
for me!
- Original Message - 
From: POTT, BEVERLY p...@mailbox.sc.edu

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Monday, April 18, 2011 8:35 AM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



I had a cat with FELV that lived to be 17. I never separated him from my
other cats, they ate out of the same bowls, etc., and none of them ever
contracted the disease. The other ones were vaccinated against it. I've
also had 2 other positives living with my negative cats (one lived to be
4, the other 8), and none of my other cats ever contracted it.

My brother, too, had a positive cat that lived to be 17- and he, too,
never separated his cats out. None of his other cats (vaccinated) ever
contracted Feleuk. Just sayin'.


-Original Message-
From: Pam Norman [mailto:pam_nor...@charter.net]
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.

But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses 
spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.

Has it been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA
positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam



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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-18 Thread Lynda Wilson
Hi, Pamgo to this link again, it explains the testing under How is FeLV 
detected



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 9:23 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Great link, thank you, Lynda!

Pam

On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
(meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA 
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person 
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she 
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my 
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of 
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I 
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA 
positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Natalie
Our cats love carriers - when I try to take any cat to the vet, others jump
right in before I have a chance to place the cat into itThey love
carriers as much as they love boxes and paper bags(handles cut apart or
removed).!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 7:47 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

On that note, Copper and Thomas go into their carriers when they want  
to be alone or are pissed off.  They even close (not latch) the  
doors.  They eat on a bench they started eating on as tiny kittens.   
Carriers are wonderful if they are safe places.  My boys traveled from  
the day they came out of the pine thicket and, until they got grown, I  
took them on rides and visited people with them.  Carriers are sources  
of adventure and fun.  I have served the boys for almost 3 years and  
they travel with me to Louisville, to various other places with no  
troubleno fighting to get them in their carriers or searching for  
them for hours.  They have a dog carriage (big baby carriage with  
screens and very big all-terrain wheels) to ride around  
outsidethey love that too.  The crate idea is wonderful.  Same  
principle as crate training a dog.  Bob came crate trainedhe goes  
there to rest from the cats, to eat or tell me it is meal time, when  
he is wet etc.


On Apr 15, 2011, at 6:34 PM, Pam Norman wrote:

 You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't  
 believe it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most  
 of my 10 cats eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the  
 kitchen  each cat knows which one is his  they go into them at  
 meal times.  Otherwise I too would run out of rooms. I have one who  
 also eats in the bathroom  one who eats in my pc room, but the  
 others all eat in their crates in the kitchen. Sometimes they nap or  
 sleep in them too since they have good connotations.

 Pam

 On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
 How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have  
 enough rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each  
 one thinks that he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs  
 so the first few minutes of feeding is spent trading bowls just t  
 make sure I get the best food.


  Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:
 Hello Pam,

 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy- 
 cat was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2  
 years ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had  
 the 2
 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2  
 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor  
 said that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their  
 2nd shot of
 FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be  
 okay for them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other  
 or share
 bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely  
 separate.  My cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat  
 will eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2  
 others cats
 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for  
 quite some
 time now.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam  
 Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when  
 the IFA test
 results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can  
 gather, the
 old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in  
 the same
 house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general  
 sense is that
 it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but  
 should be
 separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with  
 a bite, but
 more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that  
 some of you
 have both positives  negatives really living together, not  
 separate. Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let  
 me cats
 visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses   
 spits?  Would
 that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing  
 around her
 condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some  
 years ago
 the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats  
 vaccinated.  Has it
 been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I  
 guess she
 needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to  
 keep her alone
 until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA  
 positive cause
 then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs  
 it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Natalie
My two boyz are about 5 yrs old now - no health problems at all (hope it
stays that way).  Natalie

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Maureen Olvey
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 5:05 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I read that too about the 85% that will live a max of 3.5 years.  Someone in
my feline asthma group said her cat lived until she was 16.  Can you believe
that?  She said the cat lived indoors since a kitten and hadn't mixed with
other cats so she assumes that the cat got the disease as a kitten.  I
thought that was incredible.  11 years is outstanding also.  How fortunate
you are.  Some cats just defy the odds I guess. 

I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are
profitable to the human race or doesn't..the pain which it inflicts upon
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further. - Mark
Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:30:51 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Belinda,
 
 What a relief to hear! I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear very 
 many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test positive
on 
 the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs. I'm so glad that you were able to

 enjoy Bailey as long as you did! What meds did you have him on?
 
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Belinda Sauro ma...@bemikitties.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:29 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 months 
  old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 years,
they 
  slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none of his 
  vaccinated housemates ever became positive. I had them tested 
  intermittently and they were always negative. I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
  his remaining housemates are still negative.
 
  -- 
  Belinda
  happiness is being owned by cats ...
 
  http://BelindaSauro.com
  http://HostDesign4U.com
 
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread dlgegg
My pride doesn't like them.  Maybe if I left them out and open, they would come 
to think of them as bags and boxes.  I have boxes all over the house.  When I 
get a new one, I cannot let it lay for 5 seconds.  If I do, it becomes a bed or 
hiding place for them.
 Natalie at...@optonline.net wrote: 
 Our cats love carriers - when I try to take any cat to the vet, others jump
 right in before I have a chance to place the cat into itThey love
 carriers as much as they love boxes and paper bags(handles cut apart or
 removed).!
 
 -Original Message-
 From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
 [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of MaiMaiPG
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 7:47 PM
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 On that note, Copper and Thomas go into their carriers when they want  
 to be alone or are pissed off.  They even close (not latch) the  
 doors.  They eat on a bench they started eating on as tiny kittens.   
 Carriers are wonderful if they are safe places.  My boys traveled from  
 the day they came out of the pine thicket and, until they got grown, I  
 took them on rides and visited people with them.  Carriers are sources  
 of adventure and fun.  I have served the boys for almost 3 years and  
 they travel with me to Louisville, to various other places with no  
 troubleno fighting to get them in their carriers or searching for  
 them for hours.  They have a dog carriage (big baby carriage with  
 screens and very big all-terrain wheels) to ride around  
 outsidethey love that too.  The crate idea is wonderful.  Same  
 principle as crate training a dog.  Bob came crate trainedhe goes  
 there to rest from the cats, to eat or tell me it is meal time, when  
 he is wet etc.
 
 
 On Apr 15, 2011, at 6:34 PM, Pam Norman wrote:
 
  You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't  
  believe it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most  
  of my 10 cats eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the  
  kitchen  each cat knows which one is his  they go into them at  
  meal times.  Otherwise I too would run out of rooms. I have one who  
  also eats in the bathroom  one who eats in my pc room, but the  
  others all eat in their crates in the kitchen. Sometimes they nap or  
  sleep in them too since they have good connotations.
 
  Pam
 
  On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
  How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have  
  enough rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each  
  one thinks that he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs  
  so the first few minutes of feeding is spent trading bowls just t  
  make sure I get the best food.
 
 
   Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:
  Hello Pam,
 
  My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy- 
  cat was
  just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2  
  years ago
  when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had  
  the 2
  other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2  
  other
  girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor  
  said that
  they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their  
  2nd shot of
  FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be  
  okay for them
  to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other  
  or share
  bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely  
  separate.  My cats
  never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat  
  will eat
  someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2  
  others cats
  never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for  
  quite some
  time now.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam  
  Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when  
  the IFA test
  results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can  
  gather, the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in  
  the same
  house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general  
  sense is that
  it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but  
  should be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with  
  a bite, but
  more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that  
  some of you
  have both positives  negatives really living together, not  
  separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let  
  me cats
  visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses   
  spits?  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing  
  around her
  condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some  
  years ago
  the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Maureen Olvey

Even though this wasn't directed at me I thought I'd give my input (my husband 
says I do this all the time - LOL).
 
The only way I think this would be possible is if the virus is in transition.  
Like, it has just gotten into the body and it hasn't had time to do what ever 
it does to get into the blood stream.  The ELISA test and an IFA test would be 
negative at this point.  I'm not sure if the cat can pass it at this point 
though since it hasn't really gotten into the saliva or bloodstream.  Not sure 
about that but it seems logical to me.  Then the virus progresses and gets into 
the system/bloodstream or saliva and the ELISA test would be positive but the 
IFA test would be negative.  I'm guessing at this point the cat could spread 
it.  After this if the cat can't extinguish the virus or put it into latentcy 
then it gets into the white blood cells and the IFA test would eventually test 
positive.  The cat could definitely pass it at this point.  I did for sure read 
that if the virus if put into latentcy then it is carried in the bone marrow 
but not in the white blood cells or bloodstream or saliva so it can't pass the 
virus to other cats.
 
That's  my thoughts but I'm not a vet.  I know that if it's in latency they 
can't spread it which I found very interesting.  The cat wouldn't test positive 
at that point either, even on the IFA test.


“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 16:40:17 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Sharon,
 
 I have read that some cats can be carriers of FeLV and test negative, but 
 can transmit it to other cats. This is a crazy disease that has so many 
 if's that it's confusing. Have you heard of this as well?
 
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:07 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  Hello Pam,
  Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
  found out that the other one is positive. That is actually the biggest
  mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected. The doctor did say that we
  should test them again every 6 months.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net 
  wrote:
 
  Sharon,
 
  What about grooming? I would assume that those cats, having lived
  together for 10 years, would mutually groom. That's sharing bodily 
  fluids 
  I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.
 
  Pam
 
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:
 
  Hello Pam,
 
  My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat 
  was
  just recently diagnosed with FeLV. He may have contracted it 2 years 
  ago
  when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat. We had the 2
  other girl-cats tested and they're both negative. We had the 2 other
  girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated. Doctor said 
  that
  they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd 
  shot
  of
  FeLV vaccination. Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
  them
  to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
  share
  bodily fluids. Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate. My
  cats
  never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will 
  eat
  someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
  never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite 
  some
  time now.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
  wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now when the IFA
  test
  results come in. I've been reading reading from what I can gather,
  the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive negative cats even in the 
  same
  house has been abandoned. From what I have read, the general sense is
  that
  it's fine for positives negatives to be in the same home, but should 
  be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a 
  bite,
  but
  more importantly with mutual grooming. But I know also that some of 
  you
  have both positives negatives really living together, not separate.
  Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom let me 
  cats
  visit, so at least she SEES other cats. What is she hisses spits?
  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
  condo? My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days? I know that some years 
  ago
  the figure was about 30

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-16 Thread Lynda Wilson
Thanks Maureen. You made it sound so logical, thanks! I will add that my vet 
told me that Crash's ELISA test was a faint positive. I read that a faint 
positive means that he does have the virus, but it's not very active in his 
system. Knowing this, I'm sure hoping that he was not shedding the virus and 
be contagious to my other cat.  Scientists have not determined when they 
actually shed the virus but it does make sense that once the virus reaches 
into the bloodstream, I would think they are shedding it.


The other thing that puzzles me is that if it was not very active in his 
system, why was he so lethargic and at death's door?  He was a very sick 
kitten  would have died in my house that day if I did not take him in to my 
vet.


Thanks for your input Maureen! It was very helpful :0)

Have a great weekend and please pray that my other kitty will be fine.

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Saturday, April 16, 2011 4:29 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Even though this wasn't directed at me I thought I'd give my input (my 
husband says I do this all the time - LOL).


The only way I think this would be possible is if the virus is in 
transition.  Like, it has just gotten into the body and it hasn't had time 
to do what ever it does to get into the blood stream.  The ELISA test and an 
IFA test would be negative at this point.  I'm not sure if the cat can pass 
it at this point though since it hasn't really gotten into the saliva or 
bloodstream.  Not sure about that but it seems logical to me.  Then the 
virus progresses and gets into the system/bloodstream or saliva and the 
ELISA test would be positive but the IFA test would be negative.  I'm 
guessing at this point the cat could spread it.  After this if the cat can't 
extinguish the virus or put it into latentcy then it gets into the white 
blood cells and the IFA test would eventually test positive.  The cat could 
definitely pass it at this point.  I did for sure read that if the virus if 
put into latentcy then it is carried in the bone marrow but not in the white 
blood cells or bloodstream or saliva so it can't pass the virus to other 
cats.


That's  my thoughts but I'm not a vet.  I know that if it's in latency they 
can't spread it which I found very interesting.  The cat wouldn't test 
positive at that point either, even on the IFA test.



“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain





From: longhornf...@verizon.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 16:40:17 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

Sharon,

I have read that some cats can be carriers of FeLV and test negative, but
can transmit it to other cats. This is a crazy disease that has so many
if's that it's confusing. Have you heard of this as well?

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:07 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


 Hello Pam,
 Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
 found out that the other one is positive. That is actually the biggest
 mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected. The doctor did say that 
 we

 should test them again every 6 months.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
 wrote:

 Sharon,

 What about grooming? I would assume that those cats, having lived
 together for 10 years, would mutually groom. That's sharing bodily
 fluids 
 I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.

 Pam


 On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:

 Hello Pam,

 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat
 was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV. He may have contracted it 2 years
 ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat. We had the 
 2

 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative. We had the 2 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated. Doctor said
 that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd
 shot
 of
 FeLV vaccination. Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
 them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
 share
 bodily fluids. Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate. My
 cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will
 eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others 
 cats

 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite
 some
 time now.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Sharon Catalan
Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
 results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
 old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
 house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
 it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
 separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
 more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
 have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
 visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
 that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
 condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
 the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
 been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
 needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
 until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
 then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
 she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
 with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
 positives if she tests IFA positive.

 Can anyone help me sort this out?

 Pam

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-- 
Sharon F Catalan
Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.  Here 
is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this in case 
she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate information. I think 
it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected to 
socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much attention 
as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus (meaning she is 
not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, then 
adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On March 10, 
2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He was anemic, 
had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing.  He was fine 2 
days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have a bowel movement 
in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just thought his new 
food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get 
him vaccinated against leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So 
far, he has been negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get 
him another companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to 
kitties play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. But I 
will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) effective at 
all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test 
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the 
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same 
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that 
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be 
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, 
but more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of 
you have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. 
Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats 
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits? 
Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around 
her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago 
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has 
it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she 
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her 
alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive 
cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it 
tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. 
Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is 
that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting 
her in with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in 
with the positives if she tests IFA positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman

Sharon,

What about grooming?  I would assume that those cats,  having lived 
together for 10 years, would mutually groom.  That's sharing bodily 
fluids  I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.


Pam

On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:

Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman
Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?


On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.  
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review 
this in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is 
the link:
http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F 



I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats 
infected to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her 
as much attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of 
the virus (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. 
He was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to 
nothing.  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he 
did not have a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for 
diarrhea) and I just thought his new food was working well. Now my 
Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get him vaccinated against 
leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been 
negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get him another 
companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to kitties 
play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. 
But I will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) 
effective at all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get 
her siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the 
IFA test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I 
can gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative 
cats even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have 
read, the general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives 
to be in the same home, but should be separate so there is no chance 
of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with 
mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you have both 
positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were 
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats 
vaccinated.  Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I 
guess she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want 
to keep her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she 
tests IFA positive cause then we know that she is really positive. 
But the person who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests 
on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the 
positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, 
she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with the 
positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the 
positives if she tests IFA positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Belinda Sauro
   My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 
months old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 
years, they slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none 
of his vaccinated housemates ever became positive.  I had them tested 
intermittently and they were always negative.  I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
his remaining housemates are still negative.


--
Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

http://BelindaSauro.com
http://HostDesign4U.com


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Sharon Catalan
Hello Pam,
Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
found out that the other one is positive.  That is actually the biggest
mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected.  The doctor did say that we
should test them again every 6 months.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:

 Sharon,

 What about grooming?  I would assume that those cats,  having lived
 together for 10 years, would mutually groom.  That's sharing bodily fluids 
 I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.

 Pam


 On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:

 Hello Pam,

 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot
 of
 FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
 them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
 share
 bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My
 cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
 time now.

 Sharon

 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
  wrote:

  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA
 test
 results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather,
 the
 old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
 house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is
 that
 it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
 separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite,
 but
 more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
 have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate.
 Right?

 What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
 visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?
  Would
 that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
 condo?  My feeling is that it would.

 Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
 the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has
 it
 been  improved?

 Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
 she
 needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her
 alone
 until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
 then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it
 tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia.
 Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
 she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
 with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
 positives if she tests IFA positive.

 Can anyone help me sort this out?

 Pam

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-- 
Sharon F Catalan
Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey
 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Pam,
 
 I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. Here 
 is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this in case 
 she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate information. I think 
 it will answer many of your questions. Here is the link:
 http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F
 
 I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected to 
 socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much attention 
 as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus (meaning she is 
 not permanently positive for leukemia).
 
 Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, then 
 adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010. On March 10, 
 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He was anemic, 
 had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. He was fine 2 
 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have a bowel movement 
 in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just thought his new 
 food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get 
 him vaccinated against leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So 
 far, he has been negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get 
 him another companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to 
 kitties play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
 have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. But I 
 will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) effective at 
 all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.
 
 I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
 siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.
 
 Good luck! I hope this info helps!!
 
 Lynda
 
 
 
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

Sounds to me like yet another example of healthy cats being able to fight off 
the virus or put it into latentcy.  

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 13:07:42 -0700
 From: scata...@gmail.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Hello Pam,
 Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
 found out that the other one is positive. That is actually the biggest
 mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected. The doctor did say that we
 should test them again every 6 months.
 
 Sharon
 
 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:
 
  Sharon,
 
  What about grooming? I would assume that those cats, having lived
  together for 10 years, would mutually groom. That's sharing bodily fluids 
  I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.
 
  Pam
 
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:
 
  Hello Pam,
 
  My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
  just recently diagnosed with FeLV. He may have contracted it 2 years ago
  when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat. We had the 2
  other girl-cats tested and they're both negative. We had the 2 other
  girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated. Doctor said that
  they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot
  of
  FeLV vaccination. Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
  them
  to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
  share
  bodily fluids. Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate. My
  cats
  never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
  someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
  never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
  time now.
 
  Sharon
 
  On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
  wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now when the IFA
  test
  results come in. I've been reading reading from what I can gather,
  the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive negative cats even in the same
  house has been abandoned. From what I have read, the general sense is
  that
  it's fine for positives negatives to be in the same home, but should be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite,
  but
  more importantly with mutual grooming. But I know also that some of you
  have both positives negatives really living together, not separate.
  Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom let me cats
  visit, so at least she SEES other cats. What is she hisses spits?
  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
  condo? My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days? I know that some years ago
  the figure was about 30% so I never had any of my cats vaccinated. Has
  it
  been improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
  she
  needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her
  alone
  until then. We have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
  then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it
  tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia.
  Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding is that if
  she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off putting her in
  with the positives is giving up. I think she should only go in with the
  positives if she tests IFA positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
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  Felvtalk mailing list
  Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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 -- 
 Sharon F Catalan
 Cell: (408) 398-5647
 Home: (408) 229-2298
 Carpe Diem!
 ___
 Felvtalk mailing list
 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 http://felineleukemia.org/mailman/listinfo/felvtalk_felineleukemia.org
  
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
He was actually negative. The Humane Society tested him for it prior to me 
having him neutered at 5 1/2 mos in Nov (they wanted to neuter him at 12 
weeks and I would not allow it, so I had to foster him in order to have it 
done later). By March,  he tests positive for Feline Leukemia.  I know that 
he had a weakened immune system because he had coccidia along with his 
siblings when he was born. So I was very surprised. The HS said since Crash 
tested positive then they would have to test his siblings. Now all are 9 mos 
old (same as Crash was obviously) and all tested negative. So they must have 
cleared the virus but his system could not.


I do hope you found my link helpful.  It was helpful to me.  This is a very 
mysterious disease. Some cats can be carriers and test negative but can 
still infect others. It's crazy! I hope they find a cure for it and soon!!



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?


On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
(meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA 
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person 
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she 
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my 
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of 
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I 
think she should only go in with the positives if she

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson

Belinda,

What a relief to hear!  I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear very 
many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test positive on 
the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs.  I'm so glad that you were able to 
enjoy Bailey as long as you did!  What meds did you have him on?


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Belinda Sauro ma...@bemikitties.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:29 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


   My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 months 
old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 years, they 
slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none of his 
vaccinated housemates ever became positive.  I had them tested 
intermittently and they were always negative.  I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
his remaining housemates are still negative.


--
Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

http://BelindaSauro.com
http://HostDesign4U.com


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
I agree with Maureen. The link I provided you with reiterates what she is 
saying. But I don't know who told you that a neg IFA test still means the 
cat has FeLV. The test has to be a positive for the cat to be persistently 
viremic.


Like I said, there are so many possibilities with this disease as to how it 
affects a cat individually. It's all up to their immune system. Adult cats 
have a greater chance of clearing the virus than a kitten whos immune 
systems has not been established.


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:11 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Pam,

I haven't had a chance to check out this link so it may cover everything I 
say but I wanted to share what I've learned about FeLV just in case it 
didn't cover everything.  I've read a lot of websites, books and talked with 
several vets about all this.  My understanding is very rudimentary but 
here's what I've read:


If a cat test positive on the IFA test then it has FeLV and is shedding the 
virus in the saliva and blood.  This test looks for the virus in the white 
blood cells so once the virus has gotten that far it means the immune system 
wasn't able to extinguish the virus and almost 100 percent chance the cat 
will always be positive and shedding the virus and can infect other cats. 
No need to do any further testing.


At this point, if the IFA test is negative it can mean a couple of different 
things.  1) It can mean the ELISA test done in the vet's office was just 
plain wrong.  It's a sensitive test and can easily produce false positives. 
It should never be solely relied upon as a diagnosis for FeLV.  2) A 
negative IFA test could also mean that the cat really has gotten the virus, 
which means the ELISA test was correct, but the virus hasn't reached the 
white blood cells.  If this is the case, the cat still has a chance for the 
immune system to either extinguish the virus or put it into latentcy.  From 
what I've read about 40% of these cats will extinguish the virus or put it 
into latentcy.  But since all cats don't extinguish the virus if this first 
IFA test shows negative, to be certain the IFA test should be repeated a few 
months later.


If the cat has actually put the virus into latentcy it means the virus is in 
the bone marrow but isn't being shed so it is not infective to other cats. 
However, the virus can be brought out of latentcy even years later if the 
cat becomes ill or has some other major stressors.  But many cats who do 
initially put the virus into latentcy will later on extinguish the virus so 
you just never know.  The vet book I just read said that the only way to 
find out if a cat has the virus in the bone marrow, meaning it's 
dormant/latent, is to do a biopsy of the bone marrow.  That means that there 
really may be lots of cats out there that have contracted FeLV but put it 
into latentcy and the owner never even knows.  The books said only about 10% 
of exposed cats will put it into latentcy though.  So most will either 
extinguish the virus or become carriers (persistently viremic).


So I believe the woman who told you that a negative IFA test still means the 
cat has FeLV is wrong and myself I wouldn't put her in with positive cats 
until you know her true status.  Or, at least get Poppy vaccinated before 
putting her in there with positive cats.


It does take continued and prolonged exposure for a cat to get the FeLV 
virus into it's system.  Cats who eat after each other only on rare 
occasions are not likely to spread the virus.  My thoughts are that if Poppy 
is in a cat condo and occasionally hisses at another cat it's not likely 
that would be enough exposure for the negative cat to get it.  Especially if 
the negative is a healthy adult cat.  That's not a guarantee though so you 
have to decide for yourself about that one.


The vaccination has become much more effective.  Seems like I read somewhere 
that it was 90%.  I have a friend who has had several FeLV positive cats 
living with negatives and even a couple FIV positive cats, for many years. 
She has way more cats than you.  All the FeLV negative cats, including the 
FIV positive cats, get FeLV vaccinations every year and have never gotten 
FeLV.  They all live together, share food and water bowls, etc.  She's not 
the only one with these kinds of results with a house where positive and 
negatives hangout together.


Can't think of anything else right now.  It's very confusing though.  I have 
more cats than you and in March a two year old died and we found out she had 
FeLV even though she tested negative as a kitten.  I'm going through the 
process of re-testing all the other cats right now.  I've only gotten 5 
tested so far but all 5 have been negative, thank the Lord.  Four out of 
those five lived with the FeLV positive cat for one or two years, have never 
been vaccinated and still

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one another 
constantly since day one.  This is why I am so concerned, but I have to 
remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy 
kitten.



- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?


On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
link:

http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
(meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA 
positive cause then we know that she is really positive. But the person 
who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she 
HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the positive cats. But my 
understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of 
fighting it off  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I 
think she should only go in with the positives if she tests IFA 
positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

I read that too about the 85% that will live a max of 3.5 years.  Someone in my 
feline asthma group said her cat lived until she was 16.  Can you believe that? 
 She said the cat lived indoors since a kitten and hadn't mixed with other cats 
so she assumes that the cat got the disease as a kitten.  I thought that was 
incredible.  11 years is outstanding also.  How fortunate you are.  Some cats 
just defy the odds I guess. 

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:30:51 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 Belinda,
 
 What a relief to hear! I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear very 
 many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test positive on 
 the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs. I'm so glad that you were able to 
 enjoy Bailey as long as you did! What meds did you have him on?
 
 Lynda
 - Original Message - 
 From: Belinda Sauro ma...@bemikitties.com
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:29 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  My Bailey lived with his housemates from the time he was 5 months 
  old (tested positive then) until he passed of cancer at age 11 years, they 
  slept, ate, groomed and on occasion had little spats, none of his 
  vaccinated housemates ever became positive. I had them tested 
  intermittently and they were always negative. I lost Bailey in 2006 and 
  his remaining housemates are still negative.
 
  -- 
  Belinda
  happiness is being owned by cats ...
 
  http://BelindaSauro.com
  http://HostDesign4U.com
 
 
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Beth
Pam -

I would search the archives on mixing. I have always mixed my positives  
negatives, on the advice of my vet. My negatives are vaccinated  they have 
never gotten it in 10 years. I do NOT separate in any way. They share 
everything - food, water, litter, grooming...

Beth
Don't Litter, Fix Your Critter! www.Furkids.org   

--- On Fri, 4/15/11, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:

From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Friday, April 15, 2011, 2:00 PM

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test 
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the old 
dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same house has 
been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that it's fine for 
positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be separate so there 
is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly 
with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you have both positives  
negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats 
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would 
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her condo?  
My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago the 
figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it been  
improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she 
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone 
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause then 
we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells  me that 
regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go 
in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she is IFA 
negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with the 
positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the positives if 
she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Maureen Olvey

I really hope your Ragdoll will be fine.  Honestly, the odds are higer than 
he'll shake the virus or put it into latentcy.  Please keep us posted as you 
get the final results in.
 
If it turns out he is positive and there is no more doubt about it you could 
consider getting him a positive playmate.  That would be a tough decision 
because then you could possibly have two cats you love that will not live a 
full life instead of just one.  Course you could have two cats you love that 
both have FeLV and live forever.  Hard to know and it would be hard for me to 
make that decision but I just wanted to mention it as an option if you 100% 
positively find out that your ragdoll is positive.

Like I said, odds are higher that you won't even have to make that decision so 
I can't wait to hear good news about the ragdoll being negative.
 

“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark Twain


 
 From: longhornf...@verizon.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:45:12 -0500
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one another 
 constantly since day one. This is why I am so concerned, but I have to 
 remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy 
 kitten.
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November. Did you 
  mean positive? Or had he been positive prior to this?
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:
  Pam,
 
  I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
  Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
  in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
  information. I think it will answer many of your questions. Here is the 
  link:
  http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F
 
  I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
  to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
  attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
  (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).
 
  Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
  then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010. On 
  March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
  was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
  a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
  thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
  because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
  strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
  on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
  and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
  contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
  disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
  100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
  not being protected at all.
 
  I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
  siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.
 
  Good luck! I hope this info helps!!
 
  Lynda
 
 
 
  - Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
  test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
  gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
  even in the same house has been abandoned. From what I have read, the 
  general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
  same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
  fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
  But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
  living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
  cats visit, so at least she SEES other cats. What is she hisses  
  spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
  around her condo? My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson
Thanks, Maureen.  I will gladly keep everyone updated. I was fortunate to be 
a part of this Felv Talk to read and share one another's experiences. 
Certainly it's always nice to hear of stories of kitties living with it for 
many, many years and defy the odds.  No feline deserves this disease (or any 
for that matter!).


You're right, he does have a better chance of clearing the virus. I'm hoping 
he already has. I hate the waiting part. I've read that you can test 28 days 
from last exposure, some say 90 days and then every 6 mos (what do you agree 
with?). It would be nice to find more consistency on the internet but I know 
better than to expect it. My vet said to test him in June, but I could not 
wait 3 mos from last exposure.  I opted to test him every 30 days, then 
after June is passed and he still tests negative, I will feel he is out of 
the woods.


Let's hope that Poppy's outcome is feline negative as well.

Thanks for your input, Maureen! I'm so glad to be part of this chat.

Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Maureen Olvey molvey...@hotmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 4:12 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



I really hope your Ragdoll will be fine.  Honestly, the odds are higer than 
he'll shake the virus or put it into latentcy.  Please keep us posted as you 
get the final results in.


If it turns out he is positive and there is no more doubt about it you could 
consider getting him a positive playmate.  That would be a tough decision 
because then you could possibly have two cats you love that will not live a 
full life instead of just one.  Course you could have two cats you love that 
both have FeLV and live forever.  Hard to know and it would be hard for me 
to make that decision but I just wanted to mention it as an option if you 
100% positively find out that your ragdoll is positive.


Like I said, odds are higher that you won't even have to make that decision 
so I can't wait to hear good news about the ragdoll being negative.



“I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that are 
profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it inflicts upon 
unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward it, and it is to me 
sufficient justification of the enmity without looking further.” – Mark 
Twain





From: longhornf...@verizon.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2011 15:45:12 -0500
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one 
another

constantly since day one. This is why I am so concerned, but I have to
remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy
kitten.


- Original Message - 
From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


 Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November. Did you
 mean positive? Or had he been positive prior to this?

 On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:
 Pam,

 I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.
 Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this
 in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate
 information. I think it will answer many of your questions. Here is the
 link:
 
http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F

 I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats 
 infected

 to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much
 attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus
 (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).

 Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered,
 then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010. On
 March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. 
 He

 was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing.
 He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not 
 have
 a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I 
 just

 thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk
 because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is
 strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test 
 again

 on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active
 and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash 
 was

 contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This
 disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not
 100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better 
 than

 not being protected at all.

 I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get 
 her

 siblings tested again to be safe and the mother

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Lynda Wilson

Sharon,

I have read that some cats can be carriers of FeLV and test negative, but 
can transmit it to other cats.  This is a crazy disease that has so many 
if's that it's confusing. Have you heard of this as well?


Lynda
- Original Message - 
From: Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com

To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 3:07 PM
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives



Hello Pam,
Yes, they did share everything for 10 years up until a month ago when we
found out that the other one is positive.  That is actually the biggest
mystery - the 2 other cats never got infected.  The doctor did say that we
should test them again every 6 months.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 12:20 PM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net 
wrote:



Sharon,

What about grooming?  I would assume that those cats,  having lived
together for 10 years, would mutually groom.  That's sharing bodily 
fluids 

I would think would be potentially harmful to the negative ones.

Pam


On 4/15/2011 1:28 PM, Sharon Catalan wrote:


Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat 
was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years 
ago

when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said 
that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd 
shot

of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for
them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or
share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My
cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will 
eat

someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite 
some

time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net
 wrote:

 I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA

test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather,
the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the 
same

house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is
that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should 
be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a 
bite,

but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of 
you

have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate.
Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats

visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?
 Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
Has

it
been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess
she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her
alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive 
cause

then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it
tells
 me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia.
Period.
 And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that 
if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her 
in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with 
the

positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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--
Sharon F Catalan
Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread dlgegg
I think that the individual cat's health has a lot to do with their getting it 
or not.  The only precaution I took was to keep my kittens seperate from my 
positives and negatives until they had gotten their second shots. For good 
measure, the vet said to wait anoter 2 weeks. They were only 3 month when I got 
them.  Now they are over 1 year and healthy as can be.  Only the kittens mutual 
groom, but they are brother and sister.  We have snarls, slaps and screams, but 
no one has ever bitten anyone .In fact, negatives and positives are all 
healthy.  We do go outside for an hour or two, but most of that time is spent 
on the deck and lately, we have not had any strays around, just a mountain lion 
during deer season, but he moved on.  He has a large territory so he only shows 
up around deer season.  Then I keep every one in to protect them from the lion 
and the hunters.
 Lynda Wilson longhornf...@verizon.net wrote: 
 One more note, Crash  my Ragdoll shared everything and groomed one another 
 constantly since day one.  This is why I am so concerned, but I have to 
 remind myself that my cat is a healthy 2 yr old and Crash was an unhealthy 
 kitten.
 
 
 - Original Message - 
 From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
 To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
 Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:24 PM
 Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  Lynda, you wrote that Crash was FeLeuk negative last November.  Did you 
  mean positive?  Or had he been positive prior to this?
 
  On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:
  Pam,
 
  I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions. 
  Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review this 
  in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
  information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is the 
  link:
  http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F
 
  I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats infected 
  to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her as much 
  attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of the virus 
  (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).
 
  Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
  then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
  March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. He 
  was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to nothing. 
  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he did not have 
  a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for diarrhea) and I just 
  thought his new food was working well. Now my Ragdoll cat is at risk 
  because I did not get him vaccinated against leukemia because he is 
  strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been negative but will test again 
  on May 9th. I so want to get him another companion. It keeps him active 
  and it's such a joy to watch to kitties play. Had I known that Crash was 
  contagious with leukemia, I would have never exposed my other cat. This 
  disease is fatal, with no cure. But I will say that the vaccine is not 
  100% (but none of them are) effective at all times, but it's better than 
  not being protected at all.
 
  I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get her 
  siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.
 
  Good luck! I hope this info helps!!
 
  Lynda
 
 
 
  - Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
  Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives
 
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA 
  test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can 
  gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats 
  even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the 
  general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the 
  same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
  fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming. 
  But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really 
  living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
  cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
  spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing 
  around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
  ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated. 
  Has it been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess 
  she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep 
  her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread dlgegg
How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have enough rooms 
to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each one thinks that he 
other's food is diffeent and better than theirs so the first few minutes of 
feeding is spent trading bowls just t make sure I get the best food.


 Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com wrote: 
 Hello Pam,
 
 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
 just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
 when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
 girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
 they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
 FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
 to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
 bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
 never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
 someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
 never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
 time now.
 
 Sharon
 
 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
  results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
  old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
  house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
  it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
  separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
  more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
  have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
  visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
  that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
  condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
  the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
  been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
  needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
  until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
  then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
   me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
   And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
  she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
  with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
  positives if she tests IFA positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
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 Cell: (408) 398-5647
 Home: (408) 229-2298
 Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Christiane Biagi
First off, if she's neg on IFA I would go with that!  Don't know why you
wouldn't.  Many of us mix pos/neg.  I did that by accident when 1 of my cats
tested pos 4 1/2 years after she tested neg on snap test.  Never been
outside so I assume she always had it.  My other 3 cats were around her
since kittenhood  nobody caught it even though they groomed, ate from same
dishes, used same boxes, had the occasionally tussle, et.  Got the 3 neg
vacc  5 years later, everybody's fine.  

My orig neg on the Elissa got me reading  apparently, just as you can get a
false neg, you can also get a false pos.  I'd go w. IFA which you should get
within a day or so after blood is drawn.  I'd put her in kitty condo  let
her view the sights  sounds of indoor living!  

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of Pam Norman
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 2:01 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging 
fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with mutual grooming.   
But I know also that some of you have both positives  negatives really
living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  
Has it been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she
is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with
the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman
You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't believe 
it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most of my 10 cats 
eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the kitchen  each cat knows 
which one is his  they go into them at meal times.  Otherwise I too 
would run out of rooms. I have one who also eats in the bathroom  one 
who eats in my pc room, but the others all eat in their crates in the 
kitchen. Sometimes they nap or sleep in them too since they have good 
connotations.


Pam

On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:

How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have enough rooms 
to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each one thinks that he 
other's food is diffeent and better than theirs so the first few minutes of 
feeding is spent trading bowls just t make sure I get the best food.


 Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:

Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2 other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their 2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some
time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you
have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?

What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing around her
condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats vaccinated.  Has it
been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs it tells
  me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
  And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is that if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the
positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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--
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Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread MaiMaiPG
On that note, Copper and Thomas go into their carriers when they want  
to be alone or are pissed off.  They even close (not latch) the  
doors.  They eat on a bench they started eating on as tiny kittens.   
Carriers are wonderful if they are safe places.  My boys traveled from  
the day they came out of the pine thicket and, until they got grown, I  
took them on rides and visited people with them.  Carriers are sources  
of adventure and fun.  I have served the boys for almost 3 years and  
they travel with me to Louisville, to various other places with no  
troubleno fighting to get them in their carriers or searching for  
them for hours.  They have a dog carriage (big baby carriage with  
screens and very big all-terrain wheels) to ride around  
outsidethey love that too.  The crate idea is wonderful.  Same  
principle as crate training a dog.  Bob came crate trainedhe goes  
there to rest from the cats, to eat or tell me it is meal time, when  
he is wet etc.



On Apr 15, 2011, at 6:34 PM, Pam Norman wrote:

You all have been so helpful on my questions about Poppy I can't  
believe it!  Maybe I can return the favor a bit  help here.  Most  
of my 10 cats eat in their crates. I have them stacked in the  
kitchen  each cat knows which one is his  they go into them at  
meal times.  Otherwise I too would run out of rooms. I have one who  
also eats in the bathroom  one who eats in my pc room, but the  
others all eat in their crates in the kitchen. Sometimes they nap or  
sleep in them too since they have good connotations.


Pam

On 4/15/2011 5:12 PM, dlg...@windstream.net wrote:
How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have  
enough rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each  
one thinks that he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs  
so the first few minutes of feeding is spent trading bowls just t  
make sure I get the best food.



 Sharon Catalanscata...@gmail.com  wrote:

Hello Pam,

My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy- 
cat was
just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2  
years ago
when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  We had  
the 2
other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had the 2  
other
girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  Doctor  
said that
they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats receive their  
2nd shot of
FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our doctor, it should be  
okay for them
to be together again as long as they don't bite/scratch each other  
or share
bodily fluids.  Just keep their feeding stuff completely  
separate.  My cats
never fight with each other although occasionally, the other cat  
will eat
someone's leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2  
others cats
never contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for  
quite some

time now.

Sharon

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam  
Normanpam_nor...@charter.net  wrote:


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when  
the IFA test
results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I can  
gather, the
old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative cats even in  
the same
house has been abandoned.  From what I have read, the general  
sense is that
it's fine for positives  negatives to be in the same home, but  
should be
separate so there is no chance of exchanging fluids such as with  
a bite, but
more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that  
some of you
have both positives  negatives really living together, not  
separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let  
me cats
visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses   
spits?  Would
that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were nosing  
around her

condo?  My feeling is that it would.

Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some  
years ago
the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats  
vaccinated.  Has it

been  improved?

Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I  
guess she
needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want to  
keep her alone
until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she tests IFA  
positive cause
then we know that she is really positive. But the person who runs  
it tells
 me that regardless of how she tests on the IFA, she HAS  
leukemia. Period.
 And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is  
that if
she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off   
putting her in
with the positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in  
with the

positives if she tests IFA positive.

Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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--
Sharon F Catalan
Cell: (408) 398-5647
Home: (408) 229-2298
Carpe Diem!

Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Christiane Biagi
I'd love to hear ideas on that one! LOL  I have 6 sep dishes  feed in 2 sep
rooms... but, the other one's dish always seems to be more attractive for
some reason-LOL  There are times that I look over  its as though one said,
everyone more one to the right  they did!  And then there's the dog who
thinks I've put down 6 dishes of treats for him!!!

-Original Message-
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of
dlg...@windstream.net
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 6:12 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives

How do you keep feeding bowls seperate?  I have 7 and don't have enough
rooms to keep them out of each other's bowls.  Besides, each one thinks that
he other's food is diffeent and better than theirs so the first few minutes
of feeding is spent trading bowls just t make sure I get the best food.


 Sharon Catalan scata...@gmail.com wrote: 
 Hello Pam,
 
 My 3 cats have been living together for 10 years now until my boy-cat 
 was just recently diagnosed with FeLV.  He may have contracted it 2 
 years ago when he ran outside and got into a fight with another cat.  
 We had the 2 other girl-cats tested and they're both negative.  We had 
 the 2 other girl-cats vaccinated and currently, they are separated.  
 Doctor said that they can be together 30days after the 2 other cats 
 receive their 2nd shot of FeLV vaccination.  Also, according to our 
 doctor, it should be okay for them to be together again as long as 
 they don't bite/scratch each other or share bodily fluids.  Just keep 
 their feeding stuff completely separate.  My cats never fight with 
 each other although occasionally, the other cat will eat someone's 
 leftover and I think that is the reason that the 2 others cats never 
 contracted it considering that the other one had FeLV for quite some time
now.
 
 Sharon
 
 On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM, Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
wrote:
 
  I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the 
  IFA test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I 
  can gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative 
  cats even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have 
  read, the general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives 
  to be in the same home, but should be separate so there is no chance of
exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but
  more importantly with mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of
you
  have both positives  negatives really living together, not separate.
Right?
 
  What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
  cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
  spits?  Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were 
  nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.
 
  Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some 
  years ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats 
  vaccinated.  Has it been  improved?
 
  Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I 
  guess she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want 
  to keep her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she 
  tests IFA positive cause then we know that she is really positive. 
  But the person who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests on
the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.
   And would go in with the positive cats. But my understanding  is 
  that if she is IFA negative, she has a chance of fighting it off  
  putting her in with the positives is giving up.  I think she should 
  only go in with the positives if she tests IFA positive.
 
  Can anyone help me sort this out?
 
  Pam
 
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  rg
 
 
 
 
 --
 Sharon F Catalan
 Cell: (408) 398-5647
 Home: (408) 229-2298
 Carpe Diem!
 ___
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 Felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Belinda Sauro
Bailey was really very healthy until his last year, he started 
having teeth problems and we had to pull a lot of his teeth, then he was 
fine for about 6 months and then stopped eating and became very anemic 
and lethargic and had constant diarrhea.  We did the bone marrow 
aspirate and they found pre cancer cells so we were pretty sure he was 
developing cancer somewhere but we couldn't find it.  We did 
ultrasounds, bloodwork but nothing was conclusive.  He had a feeding 
tube because he wouldn't eat anything and I could tell he was 
uncomfortable when he got fed, I asked my vet if he could possibly have 
pancreatitis but she said his bloodwork didn't bear that out.  I wish I 
had done the pancreatitis test but I didn't and after he passed 6 months 
later we did a necropsy and he had pancreatic cancer.  If I had done 
that test when I noticed his eating aversion I may have caught it before 
it turned into cancer ...


He never got any special food or meds until he got sick, then I gave him 
things to try and boost his immune system, but Bailey didn't like 
getting meds so I did only the bare minimum because stress is the worst 
thing for positives and getting meds was stressful for him.  With the 
feeding tube it was a lot easier and he got more stuff then.


On 4/15/2011 1:30 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Belinda,

What a relief to hear!  I feel you are so lucky because I don't hear 
very many stories as yours. I have read that 85% of kitties that test 
positive on the IFA test, don't live past 3 1/2 yrs.  I'm so glad that 
you were able to enjoy Bailey as long as you did!  What meds did you 
have him on? 



--
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happiness is being owned by cats ...

http://BelindaSauro.com
http://HostDesign4U.com


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Re: [Felvtalk] Question re positives negatives

2011-04-15 Thread Pam Norman

Great link, thank you, Lynda!

Pam

On 4/15/2011 1:59 PM, Lynda Wilson wrote:

Pam,

I've done a lot of research myself and I asked my vet many questions.  
Here is a link that was very helpful to me and I had my vet review 
this in case she had a difference of opinion. This is very accurate 
information. I think it will answer many of your questions.  Here is 
the link:
http://www.wikifaq.com/Feline_Leukemia_FAQ#Is_there_any_risk_in_getting_my_cats_vaccinated.3F 



I will say that it's not worth the risk getting your other cats 
infected to socialize Poppy. She will be fine confined, just give her 
as much attention as possible at least until she has been cleared of 
the virus (meaning she is not permanently positive for leukemia).


Also, I am in the same boat as you. My kitten (Crash) that I fostered, 
then adopted turned out to be FeLV negative this past Nov. 2010.  On 
March 10, 2011 he had to be put down because he was in very bad shape. 
He was anemic, had a hear murmur and his oxygen level was next to 
nothing.  He was fine 2 days prior. I actually took him in because he 
did not have a bowel movement in 2 days (we were treating him for 
diarrhea) and I just thought his new food was working well. Now my 
Ragdoll cat is at risk because I did not get him vaccinated against 
leukemia because he is strictly and indoor cat. So far, he has been 
negative but will test again on May 9th. I so want to get him another 
companion. It keeps him active and it's such a joy to watch to kitties 
play. Had I known that Crash was contagious with leukemia, I would 
have never exposed my other cat. This disease is fatal, with no cure. 
But I will say that the vaccine is not 100% (but none of them are) 
effective at all times, but it's better than not being protected at all.


I hope that Poppy's immune system clears the virus. You may also get 
her siblings tested again to be safe and the mother as well.


Good luck! I hope this info helps!!

Lynda



- Original Message - From: Pam Norman pam_nor...@charter.net
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Friday, April 15, 2011 1:00 PM
Subject: [Felvtalk] Question re positives  negatives


I am trying to determine what to do with Poppy both now  when the 
IFA test results come in. I've been reading  reading  from what I 
can gather, the old dictums about NEVER havinig positive  negative 
cats even in the same house has been abandoned.  From what I have 
read, the general sense is that it's fine for positives  negatives 
to be in the same home, but should be separate so there is no chance 
of exchanging fluids such as with a bite, but more importantly with 
mutual grooming.   But I know also that some of you have both 
positives  negatives really living together, not separate. Right?


What about if I put Poppy in her condo in the spare bedroom  let me 
cats visit, so at  least she SEES other cats.  What is she hisses  
spits? Would that have a chance of infecting any of mine who were 
nosing around her condo?  My feeling is that it would.


Also how effective is the vaccine these days?  I know that some years 
ago the figure was about 30% so I never  had any of my cats 
vaccinated.  Has it been  improved?


Right now we are still waiting for the IFA test for Poppy. And I 
guess she needs retesting on that in at least a month. I do NOT want 
to keep her alone until then.  We  have a sanctuary for her if she 
tests IFA positive cause then we know that she is really positive. 
But the person who runs it tells  me that regardless of how she tests 
on the IFA, she HAS leukemia. Period.  And would go in with the 
positive cats. But my understanding  is that if she is IFA negative, 
she has a chance of fighting it off  putting her in with the 
positives is giving up.  I think she should only go in with the 
positives if she tests IFA positive.


Can anyone help me sort this out?

Pam

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