As someone who's been a Twitter user since March 2007 or so, and a
developer since late 2007, I have a hard time disagreeing with
anything I've seen from Twitter on spam policies. In general, it seems
to me, if you're not a douchebag, you don't get suspended. With one or
two exceptions in that entire time.

∞ Andy Badera
∞ +1 518-641-1280
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On Fri, Oct 9, 2009 at 2:54 PM, freefall <tehgame...@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
> Yes exactly - Twitter doesnt live by a coherent ruleset. It openly
> promotes bots yet suspends people without any warning or information.
> It opens its doors to be gamed and kicks people out randomly.
>
> This lack of transparant rules is working like a charm isnt it.
>
>
>
>
> On Oct 9, 7:44 pm, Cameron Kaiser <spec...@floodgap.com> wrote:
>> > > Openness about abuse is generally counter-productive for everyone. For
>> > > example, opaque limits are harder to game and give better detection
>> > > signals. Also, practically, limits need to be adjusted without notice
>> > > to respond changing attacks. In the end, valid access that is
>> > > difficult to distinguish from access overwhelmingly used for invalid
>> > > purposes are sometimes, sadly, going to get caught in a low-latency
>> > > high-volume countermeasure system.
>>
>> > How about you just answer my question?
>>
>> > What you're saying is mankind is wrong to live by well defined and
>> > concrete rules.
>>
>> Um, no. What John is saying is that Twitter doesn't live by them. And,
>> considering that Twitter is a relatively new medium, that's pretty much
>> by definition.
>>
>> > Of course the reality is Twitter is another laissez fair bums on seats
>> > driven site and as google proved, there is nothing like the abiltiy to
>> > change the rules on a whim, or hide a problem for a company of this
>> > ilk.
>>
>> The line for Jaiku starts over there.
>>
>> --
>> ------------------------------------ personal:http://www.cameronkaiser.com/--
>>   Cameron Kaiser * Floodgap Systems *www.floodgap.com* ckai...@floodgap.com
>> -- Prediction is very difficult, especially ... about the future. -- Niels 
>> Bohr
>

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