So, we are released from Samsara when we become mindful? Or are we released 
from Samsara when we truly experience reality for what it really is, which, in 
turn, is brought about by mindfulness? It seems to me that mindfulness, 
meditation, and all of these actions lead one to enlightenment, but I do not 
think that they themselves are enlightenment. They are a means to an end. True 
mindfulness is a result of our Buddha nature not the other way around. Our true 
nature is beyond discrimination. Also, I do not believe that Donald was 
discriminating between Self and No-self. He is not disagreeing with you. He is 
saying that you are right essentially,  but that you didn't word it correctly. 
It did not seem to be and objection, but a matter of opinion.
   
  Peace and Blessings,
  Allen
  
Mayka <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
          Donald:
My poem is insight and nothing else. Throw away all your notions and 
you will understand the heart of the poem. And if you don't like it 
just ignore it. However, by the way you answer it seems as you 
discriminate between the self and the no-self. However, The Diamond 
Sutra and the Prajnaparamitra sutras are sutras for life. The most 
one meditates on them the richest became the insights they to one. 

SAMSARA: Every time that we are truly mindful, we are not any longer 
into samsara.

Every time we loose our mindfulness we get into samsara.

A kind bow from
Mayka
--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, donald hwong <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> 
wrote:
>
> Based on what I have learned about Diamond Sutra,
> 
> The poem by Mayka is true only in "formlessness", not in "form", 
not in words, only in "realform".
> 
> It is more than a concept. It can be witnessed when the 
practitioner reaches a certain level. And it is not samsara.
> 
> _/\_
> JMJM
> 
> Phillip Rogers <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> 
wrote: 
> Very nice poem. It does reflect a message of Zen appropriately. 
Your poem has been a blessing to me. Thank you for it. 
> However, I am not sure that Bill was necessarily making a 
comment about your poem. Remember, as the Diamond Sutra indicates, 
that there are no things. There is no Interbeing, there is no 
mindfulness, there is no enlightenment or Buddha nature. These are 
merely concepts that serve a purpose, like the finger pointing to the 
moon, these words are instruments that help us to see into true 
reality. This is the message of the Diamond sutra as well. So if Bill 
takes a more self focused view of reality, is that necessarily any 
different from your focus on interbeing?
> 
> Happiness to You Mayka,
> Allen
> 
> Mayka <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> More English errors corrected: 
> 
> -- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, "Mayka" <flordeloto@> wrote:
> >
> > 
> > Bill;
> > 
> > I Thank you for your feedback, but in this case I do not accept 
> your
> > correction as it does not correspond to the insight of
> > the Diamond Sutra. Zen poetry can not be understood by 
intelectual 
> but
> > through mindfulness, concentration and insight. My poem tries to
> > transmit in a very basic way, the truth about interbeing while 
yours
> > keeps on the individual self. However, perhaps there is an English
> > error and it should be reading:
> > 
> > I am you
> > 
> > You are me
> > 
> > we are One
> > 
> > Mayka
> > 
> > --- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, "Mayka" <flordeloto@> wrote:
> > >
> > > I am you
> > > You is me
> > > We are One
> > > Mayka
> > >
> >
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
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