Indeed:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caodong

Dogen brought Caodong Zen to Japan, indeed.  His book, Shobogenzo, is a
compilation of talks on various aspects of Zen, how to sit, how to arrange a
monastery, can women be enlightened, what is the difference between the rice
and the picture of rice, that sort of thinig.

--Chris

On Fri, Oct 8, 2010 at 4:57 PM, Anthony Wu <wu...@yahoo.com.sg> wrote:

>
>
> Chris,
>
> Frankly, I am not familiar with Dogen. Was he Japanese? If so, he was not
> the founder, because Soto Sect comes from China. As far as I can recall,
> So-to consists of two words, representing two men. I may be wrong. Can you
> give a brief introduction of Dogen?
>
> Anthony
>
> --- On *Sat, 9/10/10, Chris Austin-Lane <ch...@austin-lane.net>* wrote:
>
>
> From: Chris Austin-Lane <ch...@austin-lane.net>
> Subject: Re: [Zen] New member.
> To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
> Date: Saturday, 9 October, 2010, 7:39 AM
>
>
>
> Dogen (the founder of Soto) quotes a number of well known koans in
> Shobogenzo.  There are no hard and fast lines between any pieces of reality.
>
>
> --Chris
>
> On Fri, Oct 8, 2010 at 4:11 PM, Anthony Wu 
> <wu...@yahoo.com.sg<http://sg.mc761.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=wu...@yahoo.com.sg>
> > wrote:
>
>
>
>   Chris,
>
> Any zen practice can be a mixture of different lineages. Now the
> distinction between Soto and Rinzai is blurred. So a zombie can talk,
> especially after a brain transplant and being equipped with Microsoft
> Windows 7.
>
> Master Fronthorn (Maezumi Roshi) was a good friend of Seung Sahn. Both have
> been very nice and enlightening.
>
> Anthony
>
> --- On *Sat, 9/10/10, Chris Austin-Lane 
> <ch...@austin-lane.net<http://sg.mc761.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=ch...@austin-lane.net>
> >* wrote:
>
>
> From: Chris Austin-Lane 
> <ch...@austin-lane.net<http://sg.mc761.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=ch...@austin-lane.net>
> >
> Subject: Re: [Zen] New member.
>
> To: 
> Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com<http://sg.mc761.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=zen_fo...@yahoogroups.com>
> Date: Saturday, 9 October, 2010, 6:34 AM
>
>
>
> There are koans used in Soto training, but differently from Rinzai -
> more to hone the understanding of advanced students than to prod a
> student towards an initial experience of non-duality.
>
> Bill! describes the Rinzai training, where I have heard Mu or some
> other intro koan is used to move the student towards a visceral
> experience of non-duality. After than, other koans are used to refine
> and deepen the perspective gained from experiencing non-duality in a
> more thorough and ongoing way.
>
> The hitting with a stick is funnily different as well - in Rinzai,
> they will strike you from front, so you can expect it. In Soto, they
> won't hit so often, but it will be from behind so you are surprised.
> I've never sat where they used the sticks, I can't really comment. My
> teacher would sometimes bang stuff together to make a sudden loud
> noise, which would energize people a bit. She also kept it very cold
> in the morning/winter.
>
> Another difference is the speed of kinhin. A pure Soto lineage will
> walk very slowly, and only after 40 minutes or longer of sitting.
> Rinzai I understand is 25 minutes of sitting and faster walking. My
> teacher in Maryland (in the Maezumi lineage), we sat for 25 minutes
> and would sometimes walk faster, sometimes walk slower.
>
> Also, a lot of US Zen training is from a dual-lineage, Sanbyo Kyodan
> tradition, which uses a bit of each. Maezumi Roshi was in that
> lineage.
>
> --Chris
>
> On Fri, Oct 8, 2010 at 2:45 PM, Jody W. Ianuzzi 
> <j...@thewhitehats.com<http://sg.mc761.mail.yahoo.com/mc/compose?to=jody%40thewhitehats.com>>
> wrote:
> > Hello Mayka,
> >
> > Usually the slaps are given to awaken someone who has fallen asleep.  The
> > enlightened awakening comes from inside.  You can get drowsy and less
> > focused and the slap is to make you pay attention.  I don't think there
> are
> > koans in soto but maybe someone more knowledgeable then me can answer.
> >
> > JODY
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 
>

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