Siska,
 
Zen seems to be different from Buddhism, but I think it is the same, less the 
name Buddha. Sakyamuni Buddha preached for 45 years to instruct people to give 
up attachment. That is what zen is doing. The reason why zen 'kills' Buddha is 
because the name has been contaminated by all kinds of stupid stories by 
mahayana and Tantra.
 
Anthony

--- On Wed, 27/10/10, siska_...@yahoo.com <siska_...@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: siska_...@yahoo.com <siska_...@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [Zen] Zen and the Brain
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, 27 October, 2010, 11:24 PM


  



Hi Anthony,

> So is zen, developed from Buddhism, has become a different thing.

This is new information to me. So Zen is different from Buddhism (as in 
Buddha's teaching)?

siska 


From: Anthony Wu <wu...@yahoo.com.sg> 
Sender: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com 
Date: Wed, 27 Oct 2010 18:32:22 +0800 (SGT)
To: <Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com>
ReplyTo: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com 
Subject: Re: [Zen] Zen and the Brain

  






Mayka,
 
English is a living thing. It is developing. So is zen, developed from 
Buddhism, has become a different thing. The Anglo-saxon language has been 
adulterated by William the Conqueror, so that it has ceased to be English any 
more. So when I speak Singlish, at least 80% of my thought is understood. 
 
Anthony

--- On Wed, 27/10/10, Maria Lopez <flordel...@btinternet.com> wrote:


From: Maria Lopez <flordel...@btinternet.com>
Subject: Re: [Zen] Zen and the Brain
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, 27 October, 2010, 5:29 PM


  






Chris:
 
Yes there is some expressions, colloquialisms and slang that are used in 
America and not in the UK and viceverse.  The real trouble for a foreign 
student studying English is that there is not any Royal Academy of the English 
Language giving directions as there is in the Spanish Language.  We have "La 
Real Academia De La Lengua Espanola" where the Scholars of the Language decide 
what are Spanish words and what is not.  They are also the ones who dictate the 
grammar rules, etc.  Our Spanish Royalty is involved on it.  But not in 
English.  The maxim in English Language is Cambridge and Oxford but not any 
official body of the country specialiased in the language.  So it's opened to 
everyone making up new words and expressions that one can't find in any English 
Dictionary!.  And that is amount the causes that makes so difficult to foreign 
students English Language.  
 
Mayka
 
 
--- On Wed, 27/10/10, ChrisAustinLane <ch...@austin-lane.net> wrote:


From: ChrisAustinLane <ch...@austin-lane.net>
Subject: Re: [Zen] Zen and the Brain
To: "Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com" <Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: "Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com" <Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wednesday, 27 October, 2010, 2:02


  



On Oct 26, 2010, at 14:33, Maria Lopez <flordel...@btinternet.com> wrote:

> I'n familiar with that colloquialism as it's used a lot of here. The greatest 
> difficulties are all those American expressions and slang. 

Ah, interesting. I, in the US, have no ready way to distinguish phrases unique 
to the US and phrases common in all English speaking areas, including the US. 
Thank you for some education. 

Thanks,
Chris Austin-Lane
Sent from a cell phone







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