On Mon, Oct 1, 2012 at 4:13 AM, Stephen P. King <stephe...@charter.net> wrote:
> On 9/30/2012 5:44 AM, Stathis Papaioannou wrote:
>
> On Sun, Sep 30, 2012 at 11:29 AM, Craig Weinberg <whatsons...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> Organisms can utilize inorganic minerals, sure. Salt would be a better
> example as we can actually eat it in its pure form and we actually need to
> eat it. But that's completely different than a living cell made of salt and
> iron that eats sand. The problem is that the theory that there is no reason
> why this might not be possible doesn't seem to correspond to the reality
> that all we have ever seen is a very narrow category of basic biologically
> active substances. It's not that I have a theory that there couldn't be
> inorganic life, it is just that the universe seems very heavily invested in
> the appearance that such a thing is not merely unlikely or impossible, but
> that it is the antithesis of life. My suggestion is that we take that rather
> odd but stubbornly consistent hint of a truth as possibly important data.
> Failing to do that is like assuming that mixing carbon monoxide in the air
> shouldn't be much different than mixing in some carbon dioxide.
>
> I don't really understand what you're saying. It would seem to be an
> advantage for an organism to develop something like steel claws or a
> gun with chemical explosives and bullets, but there are no such
> organisms on Earth. Nature does not abhor inorganic matter since by
> weight most living organisms are inorganic matter. So why are there no
> organisms with steel claws or guns? The simplest explanation
> consistent with the facts is that it was difficult for the
> evolutionary process to pull this off. You claim it is because it is
> "the antithesis of life". Why, when there is an obvious and better
> explanation consistent with Occam's Razor?
>
>
> Hi Stathis,
>
>     Humans are not organisms in Nature? Your statement is only true if they
> are not. How did this come to happen? Your thesis here requires that the
> existence of Humans with steel claws and with guns is, somehow, outside of
> the definition of "organisms". How the heck does this happen????

Everything that happens in nature is natural, that's one way of
looking at it. But there is a difference between things that develop
through mutation and natural selection and things that are designed.

-- 
Stathis Papaioannou

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