And let's face it folks, not everybody's willing to accept the possibility of more future games being accessible. They'll want all the old titles made accessible as well, not just the new ones. That'll put a damper on the accessibility movement right there. Mainstream devs might, with the proper effort, be persuaded to build accessibility into some if not all their future titles but no way can we expect them to go back and make all their old titles accessible. The only way that might happen is if the games were released as part of an anniversary collection and probably not even then.
Homer: Hey, uh, could you go across the street and get me a slice of pizza?
Vender: No pizza. Only Khlav Kalash.
----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas Ward" <thomasward1...@gmail.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Monday, November 09, 2009 9:39 AM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] Visually impaired gamer sues Sony Online.


Hi Chrissy,
Well, I don't know that adding accessibility would necessarily double game pricing, but it would cost the game companies something to add all the same. Certainly it wouldn't come free, of course, and it would take some extra time and effort to add. Never-the-less it isn't as expensive as you might think. The main thing to keep in mind here is that most of the major game companies use a game engine to save time and energy on game development. They can create several games using basically the same code since all of the primary features of the game is already built into the engine itself. If they would add accessibility to some of their game engines, or had done so from the beginning it wouldn't cost them much to create several accessible games using the same technology. This is one of the things the Agrip project tried to prove with their Audio Quake project. When the Agrip project started out they took an off the shelf game engine, Quake, modified it, added some accessibility, and wanted to use that as a spring board to show game companies, new game developers, etc ways in which a fully modern game engine and game could be made accessible. I know several games such as Elite Force I and Elite Force II that use the Unreal engine as the code base. If that engine could be upgraded with accessibility then every game developer who uses that engine could easily include accessibility to every title. Likewise in 2007 Core Design released a new game engine called the Legend Engine. It has been used to create a number of games including Tomb Raider Legend, Tomb Raider Underworld, and Tomb Raider Anniversary. Now, if they had spent the time and money developing accessibility into the Legend Engine in the first place every game they created afterwards would include the same degree of accessibility features, and the cost of adding accessibility would be paid for many times over after several successful titles. However, that only works if they add accessibility from the outset. The problem, of course, is all of these companies have not done that. If this person were to win in court it could open up a landslide of eexpensive court cases against game companies suing for this or that game to be made accessible. That could be very costly because instead of adding accessibility once during the development of their game engine they now have to upgrade each and every game that can be made accessible which is a feature these companies see no financial reason to do. Adding access to new games is easy enough, but going back and upgrading hundreds of previously released titles is asking too much. The simple fact is once a game company releases a game title it sells x number of copies, and then public interest in the game fades. No one in the sighted world is going to rush out and buyan upgrade for said game if the only new feature is increased accessibility, and of course companies like Sony know this all too well.

ChB wrote:
While I, like everyone else, would love the idea of having every single game
accessible in the future, it will not happen.
Think about how costly this would be, development would raise the price of a
game to probably double what it is now.
And to an extent I could understand that the sighted gamers will hit the
roof when they are forced to pay outrageous prices for content they would
never need or use.
Again, I would love to see this happen, nut chances are very very slim that this is happening. We are too few in numbers really to be a target customer
for those games. The only thing I can see happening is maybe them adding
reading out loud in all menus and stuff so that it is easier to navigate.
This should be easy to do and would not really cost more, I assume.
They already have subtitles for hearing impaired gamers but the adjustments for that group are so much easier anyway, because you do not have to change
the game itself at all.
chrissy



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