I have come the long way round to PicoLisp, and I have been tinkering with
livecoding (audio/video, not just programming) for fun.

I started with fluxus: www.pawfal.org/fluxus/
It is a great environment where you code and 3D objects show behind your
code, and you can drive their parameters from an audio feed or file. It was
written in a scheme which is now Racket.

I am not a fan of clojure, so I only tried overtone, which is a Clojure
wrapper for the Supercollider sound server. They also copied Shadertoy with
their 'Shadertone' which allows for the graphics part of the livecoding of
music and graphics.

I personally like Extempore, but I couldn't get it built on my Windows
machine, the OS X install had some issues with Jack and timing, and my
Linux distro had a few issues too. All in all, it is very complete and
complex, but too much fuss for my skills. http://extempore.moso.com.au/

I have been sticking with learning PicoLisp, and I would like to somehow
get it to work with Grace (a single cross-platform executable, that you
program music pieces in a Scheme or simplified Scheme called Sal).
http://commonmusic.sourceforge.net/
Grace or CM lacks a video creation component or library. I was hoping to
hook into the CM libraries with PicoLisp, and then use Alex's z3d.l library
to do graphics in PicoLisp. I am not near enough of a programmer to do so,
only aware that it can be done (I think?).

Livecoding video and audio in a Lisp! Pure heaven...maybe CEPL in
PicoLisp??? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0kWZP9L9Kc

Have fun!

Rob



On Thu, Jul 30, 2015 at 1:26 PM, Thorsten Jolitz <tjol...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Erik Gustafson
> <erik.d.gustaf...@gmail.com> writes:
>
> Hi Erik,
>
> > https://github.com/erdg/picolisp-osc
>
> > If interested, more info about OSC can be found here:
> >
> > opensoundcontrol.org/introduction-osc
> > opensoundcontrol.org/spec-1_0
>
> I find the combination of sound & picolisp very interesting, are you
> aware of "SoundCollider" and the Clojure Libraries "Overtone" and "Leipzig"
> (both on Github)?
>
> There are interesting videos on Youtube about making music with
> emacs/vim and clojure:
>
> ,----
> |  1.
> |     Functional Composition - Chris Ford - YouTube
> |
> |           www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mfsnlbd-4xQ8. Jan. 2013 - 39 Min.
> |     ►     - Hochgeladen von ClojureTV Music theory is one of the
> |     39:21 most naturally elegant and functional domains. It's a
> |           perfect fit for ...
> |
> |  2.
> |     Creating music with Clojure and Overtone - YouTube
> |
> |           www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYZeQ6t_5SA23. Juli 2014 - 71 Min.
> |     ►     - Hochgeladen von Manchester Geek Nights Chris Ford shows
> |     70:50 how to make music with Clojure, starting with the basic
> |           building block of ...
> `----
>
> And I noticed that you have another music related picolisp lib on
> github:
>
> ,----
> |  1. erdg/picolisp-aubio · GitHub
> |
> |     https://github.com/erdg/picolisp-aubio
> `----
>
> I'm not so much interested in the technical (syntheziser) stuff but
> rather in the musical side of it, and I have a few questions:
>
> 1. How much would it take not to rewrite Overtone in PicoLisp but rather
> to define a handfull of musical instruments that can easily be used in a
> music creating PicoLisp program? I'm thinking of a basic rhythm section
> with a few rhythm instruments (maybe just a snare drum for creating
> swing and a Cajon and maybe Handclaps for creating Flamenco/World Music
> beats) and, most important, a (acoustic contra) bass.
>
> With some musical instruments available, one could take some inspiration
> from Overtone and Leipzig and maybe a python program like
>
> ,----
> |  1. MMA Home Page - Mellowood
> |
> |     www.mellowood.ca/mma/
> |     ‎
> |       + Im Cache
> |       + Ä hnliche Seiten
> |     13 Jun 2015 ... "MMA-Musical MIDI Accompaniment" is an
> |     accompaniment generator. ... MMA's templating track system
> |     puts you in control of your music.
> `----
>
> and create background tracks for practising in PicoLisp. I think that
> would be fun ;-)
>
> 2. How to use (picolisp-)aubio to get a score of what I play?
>
> Reading about Aubio, it seems that I could plugin my guitar into my
> computer, record some stuff, and the use Aubio to extract a midi score
> of what I played (and then use other programs to convert that midi score
> to conventional musical notation).
>
> ,----
> |  1. aubio, a library for audio labelling
> |
> |     aubio.org/
> |     ‎
> |       + Im Cache
> |       + Ä hnliche Seiten
> |     aubio, a collection of algorithms and tools to extract
> |     musical meaning from audio signals, such as tempo, pitch, and
> |     onset.
> `----
>
> A fascinating perspective, but how to do that in practice? I tried to
> use aubio on mp3 and ogg files as input
>
> ,----
> | $ aubionotes --help
> | usage: aubionotes [ options ]
> |        -i      --input            input file
> |        -r      --samplerate       select samplerate
> |        -B      --bufsize          set buffer size
> |        -H      --hopsize          set hopsize
> |        -O      --onset            select onset detection algorithm
> |        -t      --onset-threshold  set onset detection threshold
> |        -p      --pitch            select pitch detection algorithm
> |        -u      --pitch-unit       select pitch output unit
> |        -l      --pitch-tolerance  select pitch tolerance
> |        -s      --silence          select silence threshold
> |        -j      --jack             use Jack
> |        -v      --verbose          be verbose
> |        -h      --help             display this message
> `----
>
> but using e.g. aubiotrack
>
> ,----
> | $ aubiotrack -vf -i /home/docs/music/sound/jimmy\ raney\
> | duets\ mp3/converted/mp3/Track01.ogg -o junk/track01
> | =>
> |   -rw-r--r-- 1 tj tj 1675308 30. Jul 07:15 track01
> `----
>
> I get a binary file with some rhythmical clicks in it, and using
> aubionotes I get something that doesn't look like a complete midi score
> of a tune:
>
> ,----
> | $ aubionotes -vf -i /home/docs/music/sound/jimmy\ raney\
> | duets\ mp3/converted/mp3/Track01.ogg
> | using source: /home/docs/music/sound/jimmy raney duets
> | mp3/converted/mp3/Track01.ogg at 22050Hz
> | onset method: default, buffer_size: 512, hop_size: 256, threshold:
> | 0.000000
> | pitch method: default, buffer_size: 2048, hop_size: 256, tolerance:
> | 0.000000
> | 0.429569
> | 54.000000       0.429569        0.603719
> | 47.000000       0.603719        0.777869
> | 44.000000       0.777869        1.102948
> | 107.000000      1.102948        1.172608
> | 106.000000      1.172608        1.462857
> | 81.000000       1.462857        1.741497
> | 108.000000      1.741497        4.260862
> | 64.000000       4.260862        6.919547
> | 64.000000       6.919547        10.019410
> | 64.000000       10.019410       12.875464
> | 64.000000       12.875464       15.406440
> | 64.000000       15.406440       18.111565
> | 64.000000       18.111565       20.816689
> | 64.000000       20.816689       23.498594
> | 64.000000       23.498594       37.558277
> | read 37.97s (837248 samples in 3271 blocks of 256) from
> | /home/docs/music/sound/jimmy raney duets mp3/converted/mp3/Track01.ogg
> | at 22050Hz
> | 37.976234
> `----
>
> So I'm kind of stuck here, a few hints would be very welcome.
> TIA
>
> PS
> Very exciting things going on in the PicoLisp universe right now!
>
> --
> cheers,
> Thorsten
>
> --
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