Re:[cayugabirds-l] Massive Solar Farm coming to Cayuga County

2021-02-21 Thread Bill Evans
There are 60+ solar projects in various stages of development across NY. The 
big one in Cayuga County is call the Garnet Energy Center. The siting approval 
process can be followed at: 
http://documents.dps.ny.gov/public/MatterManagement/CaseMaster.aspx?MatterSeq=61792=20-F-0043

The solar panels and facility will be built on 1300 of the 2000 acre project. 
There is an Intervenor group formally involved in the proceeding called the 
Rural Preservation and Net Conservation Benefit Coalition.  They are not trying 
to stop the project, but trying to encourage pollinator friendly planting and 
get some mitigation land set aside. I haven’t seen any sign that the developer 
is consenting.

The documentation of the impact to breeding Horned Lark and Vesper Sparrow 
appears like it will be limited, so folks birding in the proposed project area 
(not far from Montezuma NWR) can contribute by looking for these two species 
and submitting sitings to eBird, especially this May and June. The project area 
has recently grown and maps can be found at the link above.

Besides the renewable energy benefit, taking fields of neonic-laden corn and 
soy seeds and their associated herbicides out of production is a good thing.

As far as we know, solar is more friendly to migratory birds than big wind 
regarding direct impacts, however no follow-up fatality studies are currently 
planned for ANY solar projects in NY.  Substantial avian impacts from solar 
have apparently been a well-kept secret in California, so we need to keep an 
eye on it and push for some NY solar fatality studies.  How could a grebe 
mistake a solar field for water? I don’t know, but it happens. 

In my current understanding, a 200 MW solar project in NY would have much less 
avian impact than the equivalent energy production from 70 600-ft high wind 
turbines in the same location.

Bill Evans
Danby

From: david nicosia 
Sent: Saturday, February 20, 2021 8:31 AM
Subject: Massive Solar Farm coming to Cayuga County

All, 

see 
https://www.syracuse.com/news/2020/02/monster-cny-solar-farm-would-replace-corn-and-soybeans-with-power-for-3-homes.html


Does anyone have any more details on this? If it is done with wildlife in mind 
this could be a good thing. If they plant pollinator friendly and native 
grasses this could be a positive. But if it is just plain grass it could be at 
best just a trade-off and at worse a negative. These solar farms could be good 
for birds and pollinators. see
https://www.audubon.org/news/can-solar-plants-make-good-bird-habitat 


Maybe you are all aware of this but the big renewable energy push through solar 
farms could be an opportunity to improve bird and pollinator habitats. Anyway, 
just wondering if any folks have information on this or have contacted solar 
farm companies on this. 

Best,
Dave  





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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Loon migration alert - Sat morning

2020-11-21 Thread Bill Evans
I counted 347 loons in southward migration over Danby from 6:52-9:06 (Comfort 
Rd. migration watch site adjacent to the Finger Lakes Trail crossing, 1/4 mile 
south of Lieb Rd).

Meade Period 1-9 totals: 11,22,60,12,22,52,66,49,32.

Most of the flight was to the east of the watch. >90% were less than 600 feet 
above my ground level and the early flight was seemingly at eye level coursing 
over the Michigan Hollow Valley. 

Bill

From: Bill Evans 
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 9:50 AM
To: Cayuga Birds 
Subject: Loon migration alert - Sat morning

Thanks to all who posted loon migration reports last week. While I realize my 
credibility has taken a hit as a big flight prognosticator, all signs look good 
for a HEFTY loon flight tomorrow morning (Saturday 21Nov). 

If you’d like to report numbers using the old protocol developed by Bob Meade, 
tally totals for 15-minute periods with period 1 the 15 minutes before sunrise, 
period 2 the first 15 minutes after sunrise, and so forth.  The peak loon 
flight typically comes off Cayuga & Seneca Lakes in periods 1-3 and the Lake 
Ontario peak passes over the Ithaca/Watkins Glen area and a broad swath of the 
Southern Tier during periods 5-9. Based on past reports, it seems loon 
migration largely finishes crossing the region by the end of period 10.  

Sunrise tomorrow in Ithaca is 7:06, so the Meade periods Saturday are:

Period 1 – 6:52-7:06
Period 2 – 7:07-7:21
Period 3 – 7:22-7:36
Period 4 – 7:37-7:51
Period 5 – 7:52-8:06
Period 6 – 8:07-8:21
Period 7 – 8:22-8:36
Period 8 – 8:37-8:51
Period 9 – 8:52-9:06
Period 10 – 9:07-9:21

Urbi et Orbi!

Bill Evans
Town of Danby
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[cayugabirds-l] Loon migration alert - Sat morning

2020-11-20 Thread Bill Evans
Thanks to all who posted loon migration reports last week. While I realize my 
credibility has taken a hit as a big flight prognosticator, all signs look good 
for a HEFTY loon flight tomorrow morning (Saturday 21Nov). 

If you’d like to report numbers using the old protocol developed by Bob Meade, 
tally totals for 15-minute periods with period 1 the 15 minutes before sunrise, 
period 2 the first 15 minutes after sunrise, and so forth.  The peak loon 
flight typically comes off Cayuga & Seneca Lakes in periods 1-3 and the Lake 
Ontario peak passes over the Ithaca/Watkins Glen area and a broad swath of the 
Southern Tier during periods 5-9. Based on past reports, it seems loon 
migration largely finishes crossing the region by the end of period 10.  

Sunrise tomorrow in Ithaca is 7:06, so the Meade periods Saturday are:

Period 1 – 6:52-7:06
Period 2 – 7:07-7:21
Period 3 – 7:22-7:36
Period 4 – 7:37-7:51
Period 5 – 7:52-8:06
Period 6 – 8:07-8:21
Period 7 – 8:22-8:36
Period 8 – 8:37-8:51
Period 9 – 8:52-9:06
Period 10 – 9:07-9:21

Urbi et Orbi!

Bill Evans
Town of Danby
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] LOON MIGRATION ALERT

2020-11-12 Thread Bill Evans
A mindboggling paucity of loons and migratory waterfowl in general!  I counted 
27 loons flying south from my watch site on a hilltop in south Danby.  I didn’t 
see my first until 7:41. 16 passed between 7:54-8:09 and 7 passed between 
8:09-8:23.

Good to see all the reports even though a big flight didn’t materialize.  I 
guess we can chalk it up as a warm for the next morning that looks promising.

Bill
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[cayugabirds-l] LOON MIGRATION ALERT

2020-11-11 Thread Bill Evans
Folks, the conditions look excellent and such an opportunity doesn’t happen 
every year, so plan your morning accordingly!



Favorable forecast for observing a large loon flight tomorrow morning (Nov 12): 

1.   We are in the window when big fall flights have been documented in the 
past.

2.   We’ve had southerly winds with no loon movement since Nov 3rd (8 days) 
- the spring is loaded.

3.   Weather forecast tomorrow is for NNW wind @ 7 mph - perfect for the 
spring to unload.

4.   Viewing conditions should be good – mostly cloudy with no lake effect 
snow. 

5.   Temp ~43 F, so not brutally cold.



Loons from current migratory aggregations on the Finger Lakes and southern Lake 
Ontario are likely to embark for southbound passage as early as 6:40 am. The 
main flight off Cayuga & Seneca Lake will mostly vector down the lake basins 
and have passed on by 7:30 am.  So places like Stewart Park and Clute Park 
(Watkins Glen) should offer good viewing. If you can get there in time, 
Taughannock State Park can be a wonderful site to view the early flight down 
Cayuga.



The peak of the flight off Lake Ontario will likely pass over Ithaca/Watkins 
Glen latitudes between 7:45 and 8:30, with lesser magnitude continuing 
thereafter. The densest flight vectors from Lake Ontario have been noted in the 
past coursing down the east side of the Seneca Lake Basin and the west side of 
the Cayuga Lake Basin, but the flight off Lake Ontario can be seen to some 
degree from high terrain anywhere in the southern Finger Lakes and Southern 
Tier counties of NY.



If you have the opportunity to observe, please post your results here and/or 
eBird including the location & time period you counted, direction of flight, 
and the percentage of loons estimated to be flying below 1000 feet/300 m above 
ground level.



Best wishes!



Bill Evans

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[cayugabirds-l] Listening to night migrants on Mt. Pleasant

2020-10-03 Thread Bill Evans
Hello all,
In lieu of listening for night migrants atop Mt.Pleasant this year, I’m sharing 
online a wonderful, huge flight I recorded on the night of Sep 11-12 in Danby. 
I have no doubt it is the largest all-night flight calling event I’ve 
documented in NY in 30+ years. Rose-breasted Grosbeak and Swainson’s Thrush can 
be heard streaming through the night amidst thousands of warbler calls. There 
are regular Green Herons and many other goodies, including the magnificent 
Red-breasted Nuthatch. During the second half of the 6+ hour recording, the 
night becomes so quiet it is extraordinary one can hear the wing beats of 
migrants as they pass. 

The nice thing about this year is you can listen at your convenience in the 
comfort of your home.  I recommend cranking the volume and listening either 
through speakers or headphones while relaxing in a comfortable position..or 
even in bed as you go to sleep.

https://soundcloud.com/user-830174402/big-migration-night

While it is amazing to hear such a passage of migrants via the focus of a 
specialized microphone, there is nothing like being outside and hearing the 
calls directly.  If you get a chance tonight, step outside for a bit and listen 
up. The wind will be light and the insect chorus has waned so it should be good 
listening.  Gray-cheeked, Hermit, Wood, and Swainson’s Thrushes are all moving 
and the big sparrow waves are just beginning. 

Thanks for listening and feel free to share the link with others who might be 
interested.

Bill Evans
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[cayugabirds-l] Night migration at Mt. P - brief recap

2019-08-24 Thread Bill Evans
25-30 attended the impromptu nocturnal migration event on Mt. Pleasant last 
night, and it was not a case of the early bird gets the worm.  Opposite my big 
night prediction, the first hour or so was very slow with just a few calls 
heard, but it was a beautiful starry night with a very pleasant crowd to mingle 
with.

Those who stayed or arrived after 10:30pm got treated to steady migration that 
seemed to build as time went on. The action really got started when a raucous 
flock of green herons passed to the west. Thereafter were Black-crowned 
Night-Heron, Sora, Least Bittern, and shortly after midnight an American 
Bittern. Amidst the building flight was a steady passage of Veery and by 
midnight the “pink” of the Bobolink was regular. Also in the mix were a few 
Swainson’s Thrush and a Black-billed Cuckoo. 

The warbler flight became steady after 11pm with Chestnut-sided and Common 
Yellowthroat the most prevalent identifiable calls along with some nice 
examples of Canada Warbler. Interestingly, American Redstarts didn’t start 
regular calling until around midnight.

Thanks to all who attended, and to the Cornell facilities and astronomy staff 
who facilitated use of the grounds at the Hartung-Boothroyd Observatory.  
Special thanks to Chris T-H for expert operation of and commentary on the 
spectrographic stream of the real-time audio produced by Cornell’s bioacoustic 
analysis software, “Raven”.

More savory details of the night coming in an article in the Cayuga Bird Club 
newsletter.

Bill Evans
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[cayugabirds-l] Fw: [nfc-l] ITHACA: Nocturnal flight calls @ Mt. P Friday night

2019-08-23 Thread Bill Evans
Forwarding Chris T-H’s email regarding tonight at Mt. Pleasant.  We should be 
ready to go by 8:30pm with microphones for listening to night flight calls, 
real-time Binghamton & continental NEXRAD, and thermal imaging.

Bill

From: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes 
Sent: Friday, August 23, 2019 9:54 AM
To: NFC-L 
Subject: [nfc-l] ITHACA: Nocturnal flight calls @ Mt. P Friday night

Please join Bill Evans and me tonight, Friday, August 23, 2019, for a late 
evening of night listening atop Mount Pleasant at the Hartung-Boothroyd 
Observatory, located East of Ithaca, NY. 

The address for this location is: 553 Mount Pleasant Rd, Freeville, NY. The 
Observatory is located on the South side of Mount Pleasant Road.

We will mostly like be set up on the South side of the Observatory by 9:00pm, 
and plan to take down once the night flight calls diminish, by midnight, unless 
there is a more significant migration.

Birds should start moving after the end of Civil Twilight, which will be around 
9:00pm, and there will be a lull around 11:00pm, due to the Lake Ontario shadow.

Please take care when parking to avoid the roadside ditches and stay alert for 
passing cars.

Because microphones will be set up and people listening, please try to keep 
voices to a whisper as you approach or while you hang out with the group.

What to bring: flashlight, chair, warm clothes or a blanket. It will be clear, 
damp, and cool, with a low around 50ºF.

Good night listening wherever you are!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H
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[cayugabirds-l] Nocturnal flight calls @ Mt. P Friday night

2019-08-22 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings birders,
There will be public night flight call listening session tomorrow night 
(Friday) near the Hartung-Boothroyd Observatory atop Mount Pleasant Rd., a few 
miles east of Ithaca from 8:30pm to 11pm or later.

The forecast is for a clear sky with north wind 5-10 mph. Birds will be high 
but we’ll have microphones and other tools to help tune in.

I expect a steady flight of Bobolink & Veery, as well as lots & lots of 
warblers. Based on this time in past years, 30% of the warbler calls will be 
about equally from American Redstart, Chestnut-sided Warbler, and Ovenbird. 20% 
(1 in 5) will be what are often referred to as “zeeps”, short modulated 
(slightly buzzy) calls from a complex of species very difficult to distinguish 
by ear (mostly likely tomorrow night are Magnolia & Blackburnian, but also 
Yellow, Blackpoll and maybe even Cerulean). Less common will be the distinctive 
night flight call of Canada Warbler (~ 1 out of every 30 warbler calls) and the 
more difficult but still distinctive Mourning Warbler (~1 out of every 50 
warbler calls). You can hear these calls online at: 
http://oldbird.org/pubs/fcmb/species/warblers/warblers.htm

There will be many of other species in the mix tomorrow night and maybe the 
first Tompkins County record of Upland Sandpiper in more than a year.

We usually have this listening session in September, but tomorrow night is 
really looking good, with shades of once in a lifetime, and of course it’s a 
Friday night!

More info posted tomorrow.

Bill Evans


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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Crows at my feeders

2019-01-22 Thread Bill Evans
Dozens of crows perched atop sumac branches eating berries near Wal-Mart 
yesterday.
Bill E
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Broad-winged Hawk migration

2018-09-15 Thread Bill Evans
Nice raptor migration observation yesterday from Adam Troyer in Candor.  Thanks 
for sharing Dave!

I scanned the sky from Comfort Rd in Danby from 10:35-11:15 yesterday and only 
saw 19 Broad-wingeds – winds were stronger south (~10 mph) than forecasted.  
Later in the afternoon I noticed a steady flight occurring and counted ~250 BWs 
from 2:30-3:30 with the first half hour twice as active as the latter. Passage 
was mostly in small kettles/streams with the largest 25 & 32.  Also, I see on 
eBird a count of  ~225 BWs yesterday from Mt. Pleasant between noon & 1PM.  

We are still in the peak migration window for Broad-wingeds and today & 
tomorrow look promising.

Bill Evans

From: Dave Nutter 
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 7:27 PM
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawk migration

I talked to Reuben again today. He said that yesterday’s Broad-winged Hawk 
migration path shifted eastward during the day. Reuben also heard from another 
Amish farmer/birder, Adam Troyer in Candor NY, who counted these raptors 
migrating past his place yesterday: 
774 Broad-winged Hawks
12 Ospreys
2 American Kestrels
5 Bald Eagles
1 Northern Harrier

Reuben may have missed birds in the beginning of yesterday’s  migration since 
they seemed to be in full swing when he first noticed them at 11am. Also his 
numbers were not precise. Still he was intrigued by how similar the number was 
that he saw and that Adam saw yesterday. Reuben also saw a few additional 
species of raptors, but I didn’t take notes on that. He did not see any 
migration today. 



- - Dave Nutter

 
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[cayugabirds-l] Broad-wingeds

2018-09-14 Thread Bill Evans
A seemingly unprecedented westward shift in the Broad-winged flight this 
September.

Wes Blauvelt & and I counted a few hundred from Comfort Rd in Danby during 
lunchtime yesterday. Mindboggling to learn from David Nutter about the numbers 
Reuben Stoltzfus saw on an even further west track in Ovid.

Today also looks good for continued Broad-winged passage across the Cayuga Lake 
Basin. We may not see another flight like this here for decades.  Advise taking 
an early and long lunch break!

Bill E



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[cayugabirds-l] Bobolink-friendly hay cutting date

2018-06-01 Thread Bill Evans
A take away from Tom Gavin’s fascinating presentation in Danby this past 
Tuesday is that if one can hold off on local hay cutting until after July 4, 
most Bobolinks will have fledged by then. Mid-July even better.

While March was -4 F degrees off average and April –6.5, May was nearly 5 
degrees above average (NE Regional Climate Center data). This likely has led to 
taller grass height than average in central NY this spring, and farmers cutting 
earlier than average (some fields in Danby have already been cut). Since 
Bobolink nesting is relatively synchronous from year to year, anticipate 
greater regional haying mortality for juvenile Bobolinks in 2018.

Bill

On Tue, May 29, 2018 at 1:11 PM, Bill Evans  wrote:

  Tom Gavin, biologist and author, will be giving a talk titled “Ecology, 
Behavior, and Conservation of Bobolinks in Upstate New York” at Danby Town Hall 
tonight (1830 Danby Rd./Rte. 96B – about five miles south of Ithaca College). A 
Professor Emeritus from Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, Dr. Gavin 
studied Bobolinks in New York over several decades and is one of the world’s 
experts on the species. 

  The ecology & behavior of the Bobolink is astonishing. Folks with hayfields 
can make a difference in protecting this species if they are able to delay 
their mowing until after nestling Bobolinks have fledged. Come learn more 
tonight.

  Sponsored by the Danby Community Council. Refreshments will be served. Free 
and open to the public; seating limited.

  Bill Evans
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Fw: [cayugabirds-l] Bobolink presentation tonight

2018-05-29 Thread Bill Evans
Begins at 7PM! 

  Tom Gavin, biologist and author, will be giving a talk titled “Ecology, 
Behavior, and Conservation of Bobolinks in Upstate New York” at Danby Town Hall 
tonight (1830 Danby Rd./Rte. 96B – about five miles south of Ithaca College). A 
Professor Emeritus from Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, Dr. Gavin 
studied Bobolinks in New York over several decades and is one of the world’s 
experts on the species. 

  The ecology & behavior of the Bobolink is astonishing. Folks with hayfields 
can make a difference in protecting this species if they are able to delay 
their mowing until after nestling Bobolinks have fledged. Come learn more 
tonight.

  Sponsored by the Danby Community Council. Refreshments will be served. Free 
and open to the public; seating limited.

  Bill Evans
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[cayugabirds-l] Bobolink presentation tonight

2018-05-29 Thread Bill Evans
Tom Gavin, biologist and author, will be giving a talk titled “Ecology, 
Behavior, and Conservation of Bobolinks in Upstate New York” at Danby Town Hall 
tonight (1830 Danby Rd./Rte. 96B – about five miles south of Ithaca College). A 
Professor Emeritus from Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, Dr. Gavin 
studied Bobolinks in New York over several decades and is one of the world’s 
experts on the species. 

The ecology & behavior of the Bobolink is astonishing. Folks with hayfields can 
make a difference in protecting this species if they are able to delay their 
mowing until after nestling Bobolinks have fledged. Come learn more tonight.

Sponsored by the Danby Community Council. Refreshments will be served. Free and 
open to the public; seating limited.

Bill Evans

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[cayugabirds-l] Night flight calls tonight on Mt. Pleasant

2017-09-09 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings Cayugabirders,

Tonight, in the vicinity of the observatory atop Mount Pleasant, there will be 
microphones set up for listening to calls of night migrating birds, a thermal 
camera detecting and imaging their heat radiation, as well as live NEXRAD radar 
for visualizing the migration over the broader region. Chris Tessaglia-Hymes 
will be demonstrating the Cornell Bioacoustic Research Program’s spectrographic 
analysis software called Raven for visualizing and helping identify short 
songbird flight calls.  We also plan to submit an eBird report for the evening.

The forecast is for mostly clear skies, temps dropping into the high 40s F, and 
northerly winds 5-10 mph.  It looks like a good migration night with steady 
passage of songbirds and other species. The birds will likely be flying high 
and difficult to hear by unaided ear, but the microphones should allow us to 
tune into an amazing density of birds moving high above.

Each listening station can accommodate up to four listeners (8 total). Bring a 
folding chair or two and your own headphones or earbuds if you have them.

Location:
Hartung-Boothroyd Observatory
Mt Pleasant Rd, Freeville, NY 13068
42.458252, -76.384655

Time: 8:30PM-11PM

Dress warmly, bring a blanket, flashlight, hot tea, etc.

Please be respectfully quiet while near others who are listening to the 
migration.

Also, please be careful parking along side of Mt. Pleasant Road, and bring a 
flashlight to aid walking in the dark.

See you tonight!

Bill Evans








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Re:[cayugabirds-l] OT- Finger Lakes NF sensitive species help

2017-03-17 Thread Bill Evans
Hello Josh,
Sedge Wren (NY Threatened) should be added if there are fields within FLNF that 
are not managed for cattle and putting greens. I recall being a part of July 
surveys during the early 90s where we found a Sedge Wren with young and lots of 
Henslow’s in late cut hayfields around the periphery of FLNF, but none within. 
I suspect both species may still be irregular breeders in small numbers at FLNF 
& vicinity, especially in fields with no grazing contracts.

Bill Evans



On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:42 PM, Joshua Snodgrass <cedarsh...@gmail.com> wrote:
  Hello all, 
  I've been volunteering in the Finger Lakes National Forest checking on the 
condition of bird boxes for the new biologist there. He is currently updating 
the Regional Forester Sensitive Species list for the forest, and asked for my 
input on any birds that should be added to the list that are in trouble. It 
would be irresponsible of me to give advice without asking for input from this 
community, who are far more knowledgeable than I am. 
  What I have done in my efforts to make good recommendations are to crosscheck 
eBird sightings with the NY DEC's list of state Endangered, Threatened, and 
Species of concern, as well as the most recent State of the Birds report for 
species that are in trouble versus those that occur in the forest. I included 
any birds in the SotB report that received a score of "13" or higher. If any of 
you have recommendations for additional species, or other edits, please let me 
know. Thank you all for any input. Below is the list of bird species I came up 
with that have been recorded in eBird as occuring in the Finger Lakes NF, with 
NYDEC sensitive species first.

  Short-eared Owl- NY Endangered
  Golden Eagle- NY Endangered (usually a migrant, one recent record of a 
perched bird)
  Pied-billed Grebe- NY Threatened
  Bald Eagle- NY Threatened
  Northern Harrier- NY Threatened
  Henslow's Sparrow- NY Threatened
  Upland Sandpiper- NY Threatened (flyover record, but habitat seems amenable)
  Northern Goshawk- NY Species of Concern (SoC)
  Cooper's Hawk- NY SoC
  Sharp-shinned Hawk- NY SoC
  Red-shouldered Hawk- NY SoC
  Common Nighthawk- NY Soc
  Horned Lark- NY SoC
  Vesper Sparrow- NY SoC
  Grasshopper Sparrow- NY SoC

  Birds not listed by NY DEC, but in trouble globally according to 2016 State 
of the BIrds report follow.  The State of the Birds Watch List includes any 
species with a score of 14 or higher, as well as those with a score of 13 and a 
rapidly declining population. I have included all species that scored a 13 or 
higher that are known to occur in the Finger Lakes NF below: 

  Bobolink- 14 breeding
  Wood Thrush- 14 breeding
  Canada Warbler- 14 breeding?
  American Woodcock- 13 breeding
  Black-billed Cuckoo- 13 breeding
  Blue-winged Warbler- 13 breeding
  Prairie Warbler- 13 breeding
  Cape May Warbler- 13 migrant
  Connecticut Warble- 13 migrant

  Honorable mentions- birds that score a 12 that breed on Finger Lakes NF lands:
  Yellow-billed Cuckoo
  Chestnut-sided Warbler
  Louisiana Waterthrush
  Mourning Warbler (breeds?)
  Veery
  Field Sparrow
  Rusty Blackbird (migrant?)

  Links to the State of the Birds, and NYDEC species list, and breeding bird 
atlas
  http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/

  http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7494.html

  http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/bba/


  State of the Birds species table: 
http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/resources/species-assessments/

  Thank for any input!
  Josh

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[cayugabirds-l] Amherst Is. wind project

2016-08-03 Thread Bill Evans
The Ontario  Environmental Review Tribunal released their finding today that 
the folks fighting the wind project on Amherst “did not prove that engaging in 
the project will cause serious harm to human health or serious and irreversible 
harm to plant life, animal life or the natural environment.”

The details of the decision can be found here: 
http://elto.gov.on.ca/ert/decisions-orders/

This may be the last winter for the Cayuga Bird Club to visit Amherst Is. 
before 26 wind turbines are built.

-Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Amherst Is. update

2016-06-01 Thread Bill Evans
Closing arguments in the Appeal to prevent Amherst Is. from becoming an 
industrial wind farm will be presented on Tuesday June 7 at 10:15 am at St. 
Paul's Presbyterian Church, 1955 Stella 40 Foot on Amherst Island .



The Association to Protect Amherst Island (APAI is encouraging supporters to 
fill the pews on June 7th, to convey how much the preservation of Amherst 
Island means to the community and to support their legal team.  



The APAI Members, Friends, and Guests attending the hearing are invited to mark 
this major milestone at The Lodge, 320 McDonalds Lane, at the conclusion of the 
hearing expected to be about 5:00 pm.  Eric Gillespie, APAI's legal counsel, 
will reflect on the hearing and possible outcomes.  Refreshments provided.



-Bill E

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[cayugabirds-l] nocturnal migration tonight!

2015-09-20 Thread Bill Evans
There is a large nocturnal flight underway across all of New York:

http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KUSA=bref1=gray=20150921=-1=0

-Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] short notice, but...

2015-08-22 Thread Bill Evans
The forecast looks great for hearing flight calls of night migrating birds 
across the region tonight.

If anyone is interested in learning some calls, I’ll be up at Mount Pleasant 
Observatory listening from 8:30-11pm. For directions, google Hartung-Boothroyd 
Observatory. Park on the side of the road near the observatory.

This is peak migration time for Chestnut-sided, Canada, and Mourning Warblers, 
each with fairly distinctive flight calls. Based on past listening in the area, 
perhaps 1 in 10 calls tonight may be from Chestnut-sided, 1 in 25 from Canada, 
1 in 50 from Mourning and 1 in 100 from Black-and-white Warbler. Also audibly 
in the mix will be American Redstart (~5%), Common Yellowthroat(5-10%), and 
lots of Ovenbirds (~25%).  Bobolink and Veery calling should be steady, and if 
lucky we’ll hear one of the remaining few Upland Sandpipers that breed to our 
north.

Bill Evans
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[cayugabirds-l] Phoebe

2015-04-03 Thread Bill Evans
Singing at our house in Danby at 6:40AM this morning. Didn’t hear it yesterday 
so I guess it navigated in over the past 12 hours or so.

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Grebe fallout?

2015-02-16 Thread Bill Evans
Ice cover on Lake Erie was at 93% yesterday. With a cold week and lower wind 
speeds in the forecast, perhaps some waterfowl be forced aloft in search of 
open water.  

http://www.cleveland.com/weather/blog/index.ssf/2015/02/ice_cover_on_lake_erie_expands.html

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Yellow Warbler

2014-12-06 Thread Bill Evans
Tossing in a belated report of a Yellow Warbler in downtown Ithaca on Dec 3.  
The bird was trying to glean insects off sycamore fruit at 706 W. Green St. 
across from Agway – it was around 4pm.  It was quite active and constantly 
giving its “chewp” alarm-type call note.  Last saw it flying toward Agway.  May 
end up in the canal zone near Wegman’s like several previous December Yellow’s 
(Ken’s 2006 bird comes to mind and I recall there was one a year or so after 
that).  I wonder if these late ones are vagrants from northwestern NA?

Bill E

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[cayugabirds-l] Swans

2014-11-05 Thread Bill Evans
Several vocal flocks have moved over central Danby (southern Tompkins Co) in 
the last half hour.

Bill E
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Thursday: Night Flight in Northeast

2014-09-19 Thread Bill Evans
All,
Had a good flight at my stations across NY last night, in fact most of this 
past week or so has been great.
Near record low temps last night shut down the insect noise, and with light 
winds the calls were crisp and clear.
No thrush or RBGR totals to report but their calls were thick.
Warbler and sparrow call totals are at: http://oldbird.org/Data/Daily.htm

Proportions of different warbler and sparrow species/complexes in the mix: 
Western NY: http://oldbird.org/Data/2014/ratio/JAS/JASratioAMRE.html
Eastern NY: http://oldbird.org/Data/2014/ratio/CLC/CLCratioAMRE.html

While there has been a trickle of White-throated Sparrow flight calls detected 
at my station near Albany NY the past week or so, last night were the first 
I’ve noted in central and western NY, with a good pulse at the Derby Hill Bird 
Observatory.  

Bill E

From: Andrew Albright 
Sent: Friday, September 19, 2014 10:33 AM
To: Kenneth V. Rosenberg 
Cc: Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes ; CAYUGABIRDS-L ; NFC-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [nfc-l] Thursday: Night Flight in Northeast

Chris and Ken - thanks for the heads up.  In upstate NY do you get more thrush 
calls in the 1-2 hrs before day break?We seem to down in the Mid-Atlantic 
(and fewer warblers).

Here's my ebird report from listening this morning (29 minutes starting at 
5:38). Is this the type of distribution you heard?

Anyone else have data from last night/this morning?


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[cayugabirds-l] big night

2014-09-12 Thread Bill Evans
Hearing lots of flight calls up here in the remote highlands of Danby.  NEXRAD 
suggests the biggest flight of the fall is underway.

Bill E
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] sound help?

2014-06-21 Thread Bill Evans
Northern Waterthrush?

From: Therese O'Connor 
Sent: Saturday, June 21, 2014 9:13 PM
To: cayuga bird email list 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] sound help?

Tonight between 8:35 to 8:55 PM a bird was singing loudly in SSW which is 
practically my back yard.  It sounded like a cross between a Wood Thrush and a 
Whip-poor- Will.  It was a deep, flute-like sound, repeating in descending 7-8 
notes, with a resonance that was really loud.   Could anyone venture a guess as 
to what it might be?  It was near, flew far and called, came closer and 
called--always the same song.

Therese

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Two Osprey chicks, perhaps 3 at Salt Point

2014-06-19 Thread Bill Evans
Two Ospreys appeared to be in high courtship-like flight over Michigan Hollow 
yesterday.  I wonder if there is uncharted nest somewhere in the extreme 
southern Cayuga Basin.

Bill E

From: Candace Cornell 
Sent: Thursday, June 19, 2014 6:58 PM
To: cayugabirds-l 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Two Osprey chicks, perhaps 3 at Salt Point

It's been frustrating since the Salt Point osprey nest is a few inches deeper 
than last year, but now that warm weather has come, I have finally seen this 
year's chicks—the eldest is 20 days old, the next looks about 17 days, and 
there may be a third like last year, but it is too difficult to see inside or 
through the stick nest to be certain. The female at Salt point, Ophelia, has 
started standing in her Mombrella (a term coined by osprey cam watchers) pose 
with wings partially spread, shading the chicks below and the little ones are 
now clearly visible panting in front of her or at meal time while being fed. 

Female ospreys are the model of maternal sacrifice and absolute dedication as 
they maintain these poses for 18 hours a day from mid-June rain or shine until 
the chicks are too big to hide in the shadow she casts in late July. When 
temperatures are in the 90s or 100s, Salt Point's male, Orpheus, and other male 
ospreys hide in the shade of trees, but Ophelia, and the other mothers, must 
stand and shade their chicks. Ophelia can see the cool lake just yards away, 
but never takes off, leaving the chicks, to take a refreshing dip. Her refusal 
to abandon the chicks for even a moment to satisfy her own gratification shows 
the level of her stamina and perseverance. I spent weeks last summer observing 
her in awe of her tenacity and utter dedication to her nest and nestlings.

For those interested, I summarize my osprey observations in a blog On Osprey 
Time as part of the Friends of Salt Point website. The highlight of the Salt 
Point and Osprey sites and blog are the wonderful photographs sent to us from 
photographers captivated by the point and the osprey family. The site will soon 
be expanding to include artwork, children's projects and reading, more local 
history, insect check lists, and much more. (Pardon the plug!)

Good birding!
Candace




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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hendershot Gulf

2014-06-18 Thread Bill Evans
Nice Geo...good to know Acadians are still in there.  The Cayuta and 
Hendershot Gulfs offer unique  wonderful local habitat rarely visited by 
local birders -- the trail alongside the former is especially nice.


Bill E


-Original Message- 
From: Geo Kloppel

Sent: Wednesday, June 18, 2014 10:23 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hendershot Gulf

Curious to know if any Acadian Flycatchers were still nesting in Hendershot 
Gulf, I parked my car along Swan Hill Road at 7:30 this morning, stepped 
into my muckmasters, waded across the creek and entered the upper end of the 
narrow gorge.  I slowly worked my way down through, encountering Canada 
Warblers, Black-throated Blues, Winter Wrens, Hermit Thrushes and other fun 
stuff, along with clouds of gnats and mosquitos (happily these were not 
biting; the head net remained in my pocket). It wasn't until I reached the 
lower end of the state-owned section at 8:17 that I found an Acadian 
Flycatcher singing in the hemlocks. I thought it should be easy to spot an 
Acadian nest in that narrow place, so I took my time looking, but I had no 
luck with that.


I spent 2 hours in there. Could easily have spent more, especially if I'd 
been prepared to botanize or look at invertebrates. Rugged going though, 
climbing over fallen trees and such. I'll be limping for the rest of the 
day!


-Geo Kloppel
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuta Outlet Acadian

2014-06-16 Thread Bill Evans
I don't recall there ever being more than a pair in the Cayuta Gulf, but 
back in the early 90s there were 2-3 pairs in the Hendershot Gulf, a bit 
further down to the southeast.  Outside of those territories, I recall only 
2 other sites at Conn Hill where Acadian was known to nest.


Bill E

-Original Message- 
From: Geo Kloppel

Sent: Monday, June 16, 2014 10:29 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuta Outlet Acadian

I walked down the Cayuta Outlet gorge this morning, looking for the usual 
specialties. Canada Warblers, Hermit Thrushes, Blue-headed Vireos, etcetera. 
I didn't find any Winter Wrens, but I feel sure there must be some...


On the way downstream I also found no Acadian Flycatcher, which didn't much 
surprise me as I've struck out repeatedly there in recent years, and figured 
they had abandoned the Cayuta Gulf.


I turned around at the black locust truss bridge constructed by Cornell 
Engineering students (which is about due for rebuilding, I think), and 
headed upstream again. Approximately 1,000 meters below the head of the 
gorge, I found an ACADIAN FLYCATCHER singing, possibly in response to the 
penetration of sunshine, which doesn't really reach the floor of the shady 
gorge until 9:00 am.


-Geo Kloppel
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[cayugabirds-l] unusual song for downtown Ith

2014-06-07 Thread Bill Evans
An out-of-place Common Yellowthroat singing this morning (~6AM) from the 
outdoor pen of trucked in plants at Ithaca Agway suggests a late migrant, 
itinerant young bachelor, or disoriented individual.

Bill E
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] swallow-tailed kite near Geneva

2014-05-15 Thread Bill Evans
The one seen yesterday at Derby Hill was headed “steadily”north.

From: Kevin J. McGowan 
Sent: Thursday, May 15, 2014 2:32 PM
To: Jay McGowan ; CAYUGABIRDS-L ; NYSBIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] swallow-tailed kite near Geneva

Charlie Rouse just called me to say that he just saw a SWALLOW-TAILED KITE near 
Intersection of Ontario County routes 4 and 6, near the Geneva Experiment 
Station, going south/southeast.

 

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Re: Re:[cayugabirds-l] Osprey nests.

2014-04-22 Thread Bill Evans
On a historical note, while doing breeding bird surveys at the Seneca Army 
Depot in the early 1990s, I recall there was an Osprey nest on the lake there, 
which was one of the very few in the region at the time.

1980-1985 NY nesting: 
http://www.dec.ny.gov/cfmx/extapps/bba/bbaMaps.cfm?bndcode=OSPRorder=1year=1985comp=0

Bill E


From: Candace Cornell 
Sent: Tuesday, April 22, 2014 10:42 AM
To: John and Fritzie Blizzard ; cayugabirds-l 
Subject: Re:[cayugabirds-l] Osprey nests.

Thank you so much Fritzie for rechecking and notating the exact locations of 
the osprey nests in your area. As I said in my earlier e-mail, I am trying to 
keep track of all the osprey nests on Cayuga Lake and am starting to collect 
information on Seneca Lake. Your list of active nests is invaluable to my 
efforts is greatly appreciated. 



Do you have any anecdotal data on how long these individual nests have been in 
use by ospreys? Any recollections, no matter how approximate, may be useful. I 
know you are very busy and will patiently await your reply. Meanwhile, I hope 
you are enjoying this delightful, albeit changeable, weather and the birds it 
brings.



Eyes to the skies!

Candace






On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 11:56 PM, job121...@verizon.net wrote:

  These are all nests with visible birds.
  I went back twice to check. I'm swamped with work so will check on 
  a couple other nests soon as I have time but not before the end of the mo. at
  the rate I'm going. Hope this helps/clarifies.

  Fritzie
  
**

  Rte. 90  Cayuga Lake Farms .. on the hill north of Levanna Rd. (farm sign 
is no longer there.)
  Union Springs  Center St./Number One Rd. at NYSEG relay station.
  Union Springs ... Dildine Rd. at Hardy Rd.
  Union Springs ... Across from US High School driveway at village water dept.. 
  Backus Rd.   that goes to Hibiscus Harbor just north of Union Springs.
  Rte. 90  Conners Rd. Fire Lane 15/16 ...  North of US. 
  Rte. 90  Gorwydd. Fire Lane 17/18 ... North of US at lakeside by yellow 
house.
  Rte. 90  1st fire lane north of the RR tracks. North of US.
  Rte. 90 ... south edge of Cayuga (new platform this yr.)
  Harris Park ... Cayuga.
  Mud Lock ... old tower nest.
  Rte. 5  20 ... east of Rte. 90 in tall power line pole, can be seen from 
intersection.
  Rte. 5  20 ... platform along Seneca R. seen from the bridge on right/north 
side.
  Rte. 5  20 ... 2 separate nests on power poles. 
  Rte. 318 ... Glenwood Farms Mennonite store ... on power pole out in field 
across from store.
  Gravel Rd  left side off Rte 318 ... on power pole.
  Rte. 89  North Pool on low platform (sometimes occupied by a Canada 
goose.)
  Rte. 89  west side of road seen from the bridge at May's.

  That's 19 confirmed occupied.

  Nests previously occupied, not occupied that I can confirm as of today: 
  A 2nd one on Dildine Rd..
  Beacon Mills in Cayuga. Nest was occupied last wk.. Wind has blown sticks off.

  I haven't checked Armitage Rd. but last yr. saw at least one nest. 
  Another nest, now completely missing was at the lock at Mays.















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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca breeding goose investigation

2014-04-10 Thread Bill Evans
I’m thinking the area bounded by the south shore of Cayuga Lake (say out 
100-ft), the base of the hills, and south to the bridge to nowhere.

We might as well add mallards to the survey – I’m always surprised at the 
locations where they nest within the city.

I’m happy to put a map online and update it with nests and gosling locations, 
but if someone else wants to do this that would be welcome.

Bill

From: Dave Nutter 
Sent: Thursday, April 10, 2014 9:02 AM
To: Bill Evans 
Cc: Cayuga Birds 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca breeding goose investigation

Bill,
Great idea! It would be good to get an idea of pairs, and if possible nest 
locations, while nesting is going on. Maybe later an idea of young produced. 
What area did you want to cover? At Stewart Park yesterday during a brief 
cruise through in the taxi I tallied at least 16 pairs of geese plus several 
others that were not obviously paired. I don't know whether the pairs have 
nests, and if so whether they commute to Stewart Park to graze.

--Dave Nutter
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[cayugabirds-l] Fw: Ithaca breeding goose investigation

2014-04-08 Thread Bill Evans
Sometimes it goes by so fast you hardly have time to reflect\

Tons and tons of potential reflection swept under the bridge\

So I inject the following peculiar observation\

I’m sitting in my office across from Agway working late tonight, ~7:45pm, and I 
hear calls of geese and look out the window\

I see two geese, presumably a pair, flying low (100 ft agl) circling back 
south, I think toward the pair’s nest site\

The question arises: Where are these geese going and how many such breeding 
pairs are there in the Cayuga Inlet floodplain?

I’m guessing 10 pair, and I mull over lunchtime walks looking for gosslings in 
a month or so\

Will report back with findings\

Welcome any assistance or reports\

Bill E

p.s. this is not like counting earthworms crossing the sidewalk in the rain.

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Snow Geese on the move

2014-03-12 Thread Bill Evans
My understanding is that generally the longer the migration delay the more 
birds are ready to fly, so I agree with David that the potential exists for a 
huge waterfowl flight up from the mid-Atlantic if the weather sets up right. On 
the other hand, if weather is not suddenly conducive, we could see dribs and 
drab pushing northbound through semi-conducive conditions.

I remember the great raptor migration release after the winter of 92-93 thaw.  
We had the very tough blizzard in mid-March 93 and when the sun finally melted 
through the hefty snow deposit (~10 days later) there was a very impressive 
flight noted from Mount Pleasant.  Favorable migration weather began about 
March 23, but the big raptor pulse didn’t begin until the snow had largely 
melted on Mar 26th -- a substantial pulse then continued on most days through 
Apr 8th. During this period nearly 1500 raptors were tallied, and this didn’t 
include any Broad-wingeds. There were 31 Goldens, and symptomatic of that time 
only 3 Balds. Notable were 282 Red-shouldereds, including an impressive 109 on 
March 31st.  That latter day was amazing with over 400 raptors in passage. 
There were still remains of a huge snow drift on the south side of the 
observatory, but skies were sunny and the temp must have reached at least well 
into the 60s because I recall Cornell students Adam Byrne and Ned Brinkley had 
taken off their shirts and were pretty well sunburned by day’s end.  Ironman 
Bernie Guirey compiled the Mount P totals in those days, and for this period 
from Mar 26-Apr 8 (minus two days with unfavorable migration conditions) the Mt 
P watch site was covered for an average of 6 hours a day. Thanks to Tom Salo, 
the data was tracked down a few years ago and submitted to Hawkwatch.org, but I 
notice it’s not currently online – perhaps due do to the fact that start times 
were missing from the data. I will forward a copy of the historic data I have 
to the Cayuga Bird Club so that it might be posted on CBC website.

Tom prompted me awhile back to see if we could get coverage up at Mt P again. 
The Mt P hawk watch came together spontaneously back in the early 90s. Such an 
effort takes the favorable circumstances of one or more folks free to organize 
and enough others available to help out and fill in so that continuous coverage 
on at least the good and moderately good flight days is maintained. Any future 
efforts should follow the standardized counting format noted on hawkwatch.org

Needless to say for many of you, it appears the conditions have potential for 
some big raptor flight days in the next few weeks.

Bill E

From: david nicosia 
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 11:20 PM
To: Cayuga Birds 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Snow Geese on the move

I wonder when we are going to get the bulk of our snow geese migration?  E-bird 
data shows 
that most of the snow geese are still in southeast PA, NJ and the Delmarva 
Peninsula. 
Weather-wise I don't see any  prolonged mild southwest winds at least for 
another week...
possibly longer. I wonder if they will come in a couple large waves or just in 
dribs and drabs as we
do get occasional days of south winds in the next week but it won't be that 
mild. Not like today.  
This also goes for the thousands of canada geese that we usually get for a few 
days. We are
already pretty late. When this winter weather finally breaks, will there be a 
massive migration
that comes through really quick? It is been so long that we had a cold winter 
like this so I am not sure
what to expect.  Anyone remember the winter of 1993-94 which was comparable to 
this winter
as far as the Great Lakes ice and cold?   



On Tuesday, March 11, 2014 12:08 PM, Anne Marie Johnson 
annemariejohn...@frontiernet.net wrote:

A flock of Snow Geese just flew over Brooktondale valley from south to north.

Anne Marie Johnson
Brooktondale

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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Wolfe Island Mortality

2014-03-06 Thread Bill Evans
 in the third year led to scrutiny and questions by 
Environment Canada with allegations of a potential change in survey methods.


The take away point here is that the reported small numbers of carcasses 
found in wind energy fatality studies can be very deceiving.  Canadian 
fatality studies are estimated in some cases to be finding only 1 out of 25 
actual avian fatalities.  In the US, for example the Maple Ridge Wind 
Project on the Tug Hill Plateau, the find rate is only estimated to be about 
1 in 10 actual fatalities.  What this means is that the current fatality 
survey protocols are perhaps pretty good for estimating the total number of 
avian fatalities, but they have low resolution for indicating the species 
impacted -- and this doesn't aid legal arguments against a wind project 
based on avian impacts. The current legal test for stopping a wind project 
in Ontario on environmental grounds is proving that there will be serious 
and irreversible impact to a species. This is impossible to prove for most 
species because of nebulous wind farm fatality estimates for any particular 
species and nebulous population estimates for most species.  And, for better 
or worse, there is the convenient Catch-22 for the wind industry that as a 
species becomes less abundant, it becomes less likely to be a collision 
victim at wind farms.


From what I've seen, efforts to stop the Amherst Island wind project will 
have very little traction with arguments based on collision or habitat 
impacts to wintering raptors. Those arguments may delay the proceeding a bit 
but will eventually lose as it will be impossible to prove that the wind 
project will have an impact on their populations or habitat in Ontario. A 
cumulative impact argument could work better in theory, but again one would 
be contending with nebulous fatality and population data. There are a 
limited number of people who would benefit from the Amherst Is. wind 
project -- the farmers who would have the wind energy on their land and the 
developer who rakes in the energy profits.  Regarding the effort to curb CO2 
emmissions, the project could be built somewhere else. Birders are generally 
not saying no to wind energy - we do give a damn if it is sited carelessly 
with regard to wildlife, and that has been the case in Ontario in recent 
years (e.g., Wolfe Island, Ostrander Point, and now Amherst Is.).


I think it's great for birders and bird clubs to write letters and sign 
petitions, and the magnitude of the response may make a different in 
supporting internal Ontario politics that will likely contribute 
substantially in determining whether the project is built. Ultimately, if 
the Amherst Is. wind project is built and winter raptor numbers diminish (as 
apparently has happened on Wolfe Is.), birders largely won't go to Amherst 
Island anymore -- the days of Cayuga Bird Club members in full song around 
the piano at the BB after a day of great raptor viewing will be history.


Bill E

*Canadian wind farm fatality data data went dark after 2011 and is now not 
publically available -- only to gov't, the wind industry, and certain NGOs.



-Original Message- 
From: John and Sue Gregoire

Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2014 7:49 AM
To: KHAMOLISTSERV
Cc: Bill Evans ; cayugabirds-l
Subject: Wolfe Island Mortality

I was asked by some for the source of the quote that said Wolfe Island avian
mortality was the second highest in NA. After some searching we find that it 
came
from an analysis by our own Bill Evans. The link to that article is below. 
Not to
belabor the point but John Confer's last paragraph goes to the heart of our 
concerns

for Amherst Island...the importance of habitat.

I was sent a second source, a PDf outlining deaths across Canadian wind 
farms and it
does show Wolfe to be the highest and second for tat year only to Altamont 
in CA.It
was written by Lyle Friesen of the CWS for the OFO (Ontario Field 
Ornithologist)

Journal. Unfortunately I can't get that PDF to link in acceptable form.
john

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/windfarm-turbines-deadly-for-birds-bats/article4392511/


--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
Conserve and Create Habitat






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Re: [cayugabirds-l] lake ice waterfowl

2014-01-28 Thread Bill Evans
Just found this paper that shows in 1994 Lake Erie went from ~50% iced over on 
Jan 12 to ~100% on Jan 21 (Fig. 8).  I’m imagining grebes on 5000 square miles 
of lake getting confined to a smaller and smaller area over a week then 
abruptly on one calm night being forced to evacuate en masse.

http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/10.1175/1520-0477(1996)077%3C0071%3AWWAICF%3E2.0.CO%3B2

Lake Erie was reported to be 95% ice covered last Thursday, so I imagine the 
most recent cold snap has by now pretty much eliminated that lake’s open water 
for waterfowl.

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Amherst Island Wind Project

2014-01-17 Thread Bill Evans
Cayugabirders,
The public comment period for the proposed Amherst Island Wind Farm is now 
open.  The message below was posted to the Kingston Field Naturalists Facebook 
page last night.
**
Birders and Naturalists: 

Opposition to wind turbines on Amherst Island has entered the next phase and we 
need your help. This is a plea to join Jean Iron, Ron Pittaway, Dr. Roberta 
Bondar, and birders worldwide to oppose wind turbines on the Island and in 
particular adjacent to Owl Woods, world famous as a birding destination and a 
favourite for life owls. 

The Ontario Ministry of the Environment has invited public comments on a 
Renewable Energy Approval application by Windlectric/Algonquin Power to build 
up to 36 industrial wind turbines on Amherst Island. Comments must be received 
by March 8, 2014. 

The posting is here on the Environmental Registry (or visit www.ebr.gov.on.ca 
and enter the number 012-0774 in the search line.) 

You are asked to send one email to oppose the industrialization of Amherst 
Island by writing to Susanne Edwards, Ontario Ministry of the Environment (with 
EBR 012-0774 in the subject line) by March 8, 2014. 

To: susanne.edwa...@ontario.ca, with copies to prem...@ontario.ca, 
minister@ontario.ca, ian.parr...@ontario.ca and protec...@kos.net 

Please tell the Ministry in your words why it is important to preserve Amherst 
Island. Some of the key messages you may wish to address include: 
• All of Amherst Island is an Important Bird Area of Global Significance on the 
Atlantic Migratory flyway and is home to 34 species at risk including 
Blanding’s Turtle. Habitat will be fragmented and lost. 
• The Island is internationally recognized for concentrations of wintering 
hawks and owls, with birders travelling from around the world to visit Owl 
Woods, where it is possible to see up to 11 species of owls. 
• Amherst Island was ranked second in biodiversity significance (Lake Ontario 
Islands – 
Northeast), and includes 400 hectares of Provincially Significant Coastal 
Wetland. 
• Amherst Island is one of Nature’s jewels in Lake Ontario — of similar 
significance to 
Point Pelee for migratory birds 

Named one of the Top Ten Endangered Places in Canada by the Heritage Canada 
Foundation (now known as Heritage Canada The National Trust) due to the threat 
of wind turbines on its rich cultural and natural heritage, Amherst Island is 
simply the wrong place for wind turbines. 

You can learn more about Amherst Island at: Facebook: 
www.facebook.com/ProtectAmherstIsland . 
Web: protectamherstisland.com
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] EVENING GROSBEAK, Brooktondale (slightly OOB)

2013-05-10 Thread Bill Evans
Heard and saw a small flock of Evening Grosbeaks @ 7:30 this morning in 
northbound flight over Bald Hill Rd. in Danby.

Also, while biking to Ithaca I was surprised to hear a White-crowned Sparrow 
singing in the landscaped intersection between Barnes  Noble and Wegmans.

Bill E 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Pheasant

2013-03-25 Thread Bill Evans
There has been a small but regular population of pheasants inhabiting the 
brushy fields west of 96B (from Muzzy Rd to Miller Rd) for at least the past 
eight years. I found a roadkill on 96B last summer and see individuals a few 
times a year in this area.  I’ve suspected that the owners of one or more of 
these fields release them for hunting.

Bill E

From: David McDermitt 
Sent: Monday, March 25, 2013 9:30 AM
To: cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Pheasant

Enjoyed seeing a single ring-necked pheasant skulk around the perimeter of our 
backyard this weekend in Danby.

Dave

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] 100+ Redpolls-for a minute

2013-01-09 Thread Bill Evans
In the last week of Dec and on the CBC count day, I carried out a number of 
stationary counts from a parking lot at IC to see what was moving in the 
mornings. There was regular southbound passage of redpoll flocks, at least 
in the first two hours of daylight.  For example, on Jan 1 I had three 
southbound flocks, totally ~130, from 7:45-8:45AM.


The only other passerine species moving was crow, with a steady trickle 
southbound down the east side of the inlet valley in the morning. Beginning 
at some point in the early afternoon, there appeared to be a return 
northbound flight of crows.  During my observations I saw no northbound 
flocks of redpolls.


My sense in watching the same phenomenon at my house that Laura described is 
that they occasionally take breaks that are unrelated to normal back and 
forth from being spooked or from real predators.


Bill E 





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Re: [cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from hunting diving ducks

2013-01-05 Thread Bill Evans
This would be a nice accomplishment that is long overdue. I’ve thought that the 
“few individuals...greatly reducing the pleasure of many” angle should be 
enough to produce such an exemption, but your approach of population analysis 
and presenting a scientific case for the exemption might help facilitate the 
change for DEC.  Certainly the issue of hunting in such close proximity to a 
population center seems like it could be a driver – besides the safety issue, 
the sound of gunshots can be quite unnerving for some in our society.  

From the birding and environmental education perspective, it would be 
wonderful to enjoy viewing large rafts of Aythya ducks and their cohorts on a 
more consistent basis.

Nearly 20 years ago Common Council voted to ban hunting in Allan Treman Marine 
Park – apparently the City of Ithaca had allowed hunting there after it was 
purchased by the state in 1976. Hunting currently occurs in the water offshore, 
and I’m not clear on jurisdiction involved.

Bill E

From: John Confer 
Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2013 2:55 PM
To: Cayuga Bird List ; Confer, Karen ; j...@cornell.edu 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] (Long comment) Exempt part of Cayuga Lake from hunting 
diving ducks

Hi Folks,

CBC are always fun for many reasons. It tickles the grey cells to think 
about population trends and regulatory factors. I shared a fun discussion about 
the impact of hunting on waterfowl on the south end and the rest of Cayuga Lake 
and we discussed if there were objective data on population abundance to 
justify preventing such hunting. This got me thinking.
  The Fish and Wildlife spends an immense amount of effort to census waterfowl 
every year: extensive aerial surveys that criss-cross the prairie potholes and 
elsewhere and Hudson Bay coast, really extensive banding efforts, and hundreds 
of hours of ground surveys, etc. All of this provides an estimate of pop 
abundance for each species. This is used to set bag limits. This immense effort 
is predicated on the belief that hunters are one of the significant factors 
that regulate waterfowl abundance, and that to sustain the population at nearly 
level numbers over the long term, one must adjust the bag limit in some 
proportion to the abundance at the start of fall migration. In the same line of 
reasoning, the spring snow goose hunting season and the split canada goose 
hunting season are all based on the belief that hunting in general regulates 
waterfowl abundance. The newly proposed expansion of waterfowl hunting on snow 
geese for Montezuma is also based on hunting will continue to regulate 
abundance. Either, hunting does regulate waterfowl abundance, or the FWS is 
fooling us and themselves.
  It is impossible to acquire the specific, statistically-based evidence 
that hunting regulates the specific population of waterfowl using Cayuga Lake 
for several reasons. There is no reason to believe that the impact of hunting 
of waterfowl on Cayuga Lake is exempt from this generality. In fact, it would 
be incumbent for the merit of such an argument to provide evidence why Cayuga 
Lake is an exception to the general concept of waterfowl management. 
Difficulties in making data-based arguments about waterfowl on Cayuga Lake 
include many factors.
1) There is no estimate of the take, which obviously means you can't quantify 
the impact. The absence of the fundamental data limits the ability to say if 
there is or isn't an effect.  
2)There is no way to estimate the impact of driving the waterfowl out of their 
favored foraging site. A reasonable hypothesis is that winter food supply is 
important. Waterfowl speak with their wings. This provides strong support for 
the hypothesis that the shallows of Cayuga Lake provide a favorable foraging 
site. There are no other areas in the inland northeast that have as many diving 
ducks in mid-winter as Seneca and Cayuga Lakes. The abundance of diving 
waterfowl on these lakes during times outside of the hunting season suggest 
that this food source may be one of the best in the entire winter range. In 
which case, limiting access to a food source for part of the winter may be very 
deleterious, and could have negative effects on far more than the number killed 
by shot.
3) When I first came here, there was a waterfowl bander on Seneca Lake. I never 
met him and don't recall his name. I was told, with what seemed like high 
credibility, that banding indicated that waterfowl moved back and forth between 
Seneca Lake, and by inference Cayuga Lake as well, and the coast repeatedly 
during the winter.  Thus, populations on Seneca Lake, and by inference Cayuga 
Lake, are a sub-sample of the eastern population. The suggestion that an 
increase in waterfowl on Cayuga Lake during the winter shows that hunting on 
Cayuga Lake has no impact on the Cayuga Lake population fails to consider that 
the Cayuga Lake population is a portion of and exchanges with the east coast 
wintering population. In order 

Re:[cayugabirds-l] Swan count for CBC

2013-01-04 Thread Bill Evans
Last night I made of a Google map of the swan flock information reported to the 
listserv. I updated the trajectories and markers this morning adding some 
deductive/speculative text.
Cayuga Bird Club 2013 CBC Swan flock map (click markers to read text – if you 
have a Google acct and log in you can add information to the map)

The evidence suggests some flocks were double and even triple counted, but as 
Ken pointed out there are still some things that don’t add up. Two pieces of 
information that would help complete the picture would be more description on 
the location and trajectory of the flock of 21 (@ ~2:45pm) seen by Marty’s 
group. I don’t have that flock on the map and it doesn’t seem like it could 
have been the same flock of 19 I had at 2:15 or Ken had at 2PM, which were 
plausibly the same flock. Also, any swan flock information from section V 
(Sandy’s section) would be useful in determining whether the 40 seen there were 
unique flocks or flocks that had already been counted.

Anyone else who saw swan flocks on January 1st, please have a look at the map 
and see if your information matches or suggests additional unique flocks.

As of now there is a fairly solid case for a minimum of 163 southbound swans on 
count day. This presumes that swan flocks that exited the city of Ithaca in 
southbound flight didn’t return.

Bill E 
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Re: Re:[cayugabirds-l] Swan count for CBC

2013-01-04 Thread Bill Evans
Last night I made of a Google map of the swan flock information reported to the 
listserv. I updated the trajectories and markers this morning adding some 
deductive/speculative text.

Cayuga Bird Club 2013 CBC Swan flock map (click markers to read text – if you 
have a Google acct and log in you can add information to the map)

The evidence suggests some flocks were double and even triple counted, but as 
Ken pointed out there are still some things that don’t add up. Two pieces of 
information that would help complete the picture would be more description on 
the location and trajectory of the flock of 21 (@ ~2:45pm) seen by Marty’s 
group. I don’t have that flock on the map and it doesn’t seem like it could 
have been the same flock of 19 I had at 2:15 or Ken had at 2PM, which were 
plausibly the same flock.  Also, any swan flock information from section V 
(Sandy’s section) would be useful in determining whether the 40 seen there were 
unique flocks or flocks that had already been counted.

Anyone else who saw swan flocks on January 1st, please have a look at the map 
and see if your information matches or suggests additional unique flocks.

As of now there is fairly solid case  for a minimum of 163 southbound swans on 
count day. This presumes that swan flocks that exited the city of Ithaca in 
southbound flight didn’t return.

Bill E 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Swan count for CBC

2013-01-04 Thread Bill Evans
Jody,

The concept of avoiding double counting is implied in the nature of the CBC, 
and there is a spectrum in the level of attentiveness in avoiding double 
counting for different species, different locations, and by different birding 
parties. The key idea amidst all the variables, as you note, is maintaining the 
utility of the data for long-term interpretation of changes, and this involves 
consistency of monitoring (even if it is rough around the edges). Of course 
there is no realistic means for preventing double-counting of chickadees in a 
neighborhood with multiple feeders, but every year there is a concerted effort 
not to double count waterfowl at Stewart Park -- the highest tallies are 
typically taken instead of adding each observer’s sightings, or as I recall, 
one person is designated to count geese, gulls etc. on the lake.

Swans have only been documented on (I believe) 6 Ithaca CBCs in the past 100+ 
years, all in the last two decades. Whatever count total is used, this year is 
our record high count. I don’t recall any years like this one when we had 
multiple flocks in passage, so the previous count totals were likely highly 
accurate and not subject to being double-counted.  However, the evidence 
suggests that a section-added count of ~400 is a 100% overestimate. Using the 
section-added total would likely be a gross deviation from the status quo with 
regard to the accuracy of past swan counts on our CBC. Like the coordinated 
effort at Stewart Park to prevent multiple waterfowl counts, the swan tally 
could be corrected with a bit of coordination in observations this year and 
foresight in future years (i.e., noting flock size, location, trajectory, and 
time).

So, while I generally agree with the importance of maintaining the status quo 
in counting procedures, I don’t agree with projecting the status quo of a 
section-added count (i.e., for chickadees) on swans.

Asher, section counts would not be denied their birds. As one can see from the 
map, section counts in fact help ascertain the accuracy of the migration tally.

Bill E

The evidence suggests some flocks were double and even triple counted, but as 
Ken pointed out there are still some things that don’t add up. Two pieces of 
information that would he
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] More CBC birds for 2013

2013-01-03 Thread Bill Evans
The other issue I’ve been wondering about is counts of migrating birds crossing 
the count circle, in particular migrating swans this year. Perhaps this was 
addressed at the compilation dinner, otherwise I suspect the 396 total that 
Dave posted in his quick summary involves flocks being counted multiple times. 
Unless flock size and timing is noted, I don’t see how this can be avoided 
except perhaps if we take the highest count by one survey party. 

While covering section VI, I noted southbound swan flocks of 19, 15, 29, and 53 
between 2:15 and 3PM (I have exact times and trajectories if anybody’s 
interested). All these flocks likely passed over sections VIII  IX and some 
would have been visible from sections V  VII.  Unless redundant counts were 
somehow culled out at the compilation, I wouldn’t be surprised if these four 
flocks made up the bulk of the 396 swans in Dave’s quick summary.

Typically in the past we’ve had no substantial visible migration on count days, 
though I remember one year more than a decade ago when the count coincided with 
the passage of a brutal cold front and there was massive southbound evacuation 
of 1000s of Canvasback and other Aythya. As I recall, there wasn’t a problem in 
double counting that year because only one party in section VIII happened to 
witness the event.

Bill E 

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca Christmas Bird Count 1/1/2013 - quick dirty data; what to look for

2013-01-02 Thread Bill Evans
Dave,

Thanks for posting the quick summary again this year (a fine service for those 
of us unable to attend the compilation dinner)!

FYI, the Winter Wren was foraging within exposed roots and fallen tree stumps 
along the inlet stream behind Grayhaven Motel. 42.407611,-76.538562

Bill

From: nutter.d...@me.com 
Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2013 11:03 PM
To: cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca Christmas Bird Count 1/1/2013 - quick  dirty 
data; what to look for

From my notes at the compilation of today's Ithaca Christmas Bird Count:
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca Christmas Bird Count 1/1/2013 - quick dirty data; what to look for

2013-01-02 Thread Bill Evans
Dave,
Thanks for posting the quick summary again this year (a fine service for those 
of us unable to attend the compilation dinner)!

The Winter Wren was foraging within exposed roots and fallen tree stumps along 
the stream behind Grayhaven Motel. 42.407611,-76.538562

Bill

From: nutter.d...@me.com 
Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2013 11:03 PM
To: cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca Christmas Bird Count 1/1/2013 - quick  dirty 
data; what to look for

From my notes at the compilation of today's Ithaca Christmas Bird Count:


These 95 Species (plus 1 hybrid) were found on today's count:

Snow Goose
Cackling Goose - 2 at Stewart Park by Ken Rosenberg
Canada Goose
Tundra Swan  - new high of 396: many flocks migrating
Gadwall
5
American Wigeon - 2 at Stewart Park by Ken Rosenberg?
American Black Duck
Mallard
(Mallard x American Black Duck - 1 at Stewart Park?)
Northern Pintail
Redhead
10
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Surf Scoter - 1 north of East Shore by Chris Wood
White-winged Scoter - 1 at Stewart Park by Ken Rosenberg?
15
BLACK SCOTER - NEW FOR COUNT - 2 from Treman or west shore by Scott Sutcliffe, 
possibly those I found Friday 28 December
Long-tailed Duck - 1 by Chris Wood (location?)
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Hooded Merganser
20
Common Merganser
Ruddy Duck - 2 in southwest part of Cayuga Lake found by me
Ruffed Grouse
Wild Turkey
Common Loon - 1 flying south of Myers found by Kevin McGowan  Lee Ann Van Leer
25
Pied-billed Grebe - 1 north of East Shore found by ?
Double-crested Cormorant - 1 southwest Cayuga Lake found by Scott Sutcliffe
Great Blue Heron
Turkey Vulture
Bald Eagle
30
Northern Harrier
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Northern Goshawk - 1 found by Chris Wood coming to his feeders
Red-tailed Hawk
35
Rough-legged Hawk
American Kestrel
Merlin - 4 
Peregrine Falcon - 1 found by Bob McGuire at Stewart Park
American Coot
40
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Glaucous Gull - 1 found by Chris Wood at Stewart Park?
Great Black-backed Gull
Rock Pigeon
45
Mourning Dove
Eastern Screech-Owl
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Northern Saw-whet Owl - 1 attracted to Chris Wood in his hot tub
50
Belted Kingfisher
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
55
Pileated Woodpecker
Northern Shrike
Blue Jay
American Crow
Fish Crow - 6 found by Kevin McGowan near Sciencenter
60
Common Raven - 20
Horned Lark
Black-capped Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Red-breasted Nuthatch
65
White-breasted Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Carolina Wren
Winter Wren - 1 by Bill Evans (location?)
Golden-crowned Kinglet
70
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
American Pipit - 1 at Dodge  Stevenson Rds by Gin Mistry, 1 on white 
lighthouse jetty by Ken Rosenberg
75
Cedar Waxwing
Lapland Longspur - 2 found by Meena Haribal on Irish Settlement Rd near NYS-13
Snow Bunting
Yellow-rumped Warbler - 3 found by Asher Hockett below old NCR factory on South 
Hill
American Tree Sparrow
80
Savannah Sparrow - 1 on Bluegrass Lane, 1 on Waterwagon Rd by NYS-34
Song Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
85
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird - 3
Brown-headed Cowbird - 5
Purple Finch
House Finch
90
Common Redpoll
Hoary Redpoll - 1 on Sheldon Rd south of NYS-34-B found by Colleen Richards
Pine Siskin
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow
95


These species have already been found as Count Week birds, but may or may not 
have been found yet in the Cayuga Lake Basin in 2013:

Northern Shoveler - found count week last 3 days at Stewart  Treman Parks; 
found outside count circle today at Myers by Chris Wood
Canvasback - found count week by me off Treman Park
Lesser Black-backed Gull - count week: found on 30 December by me on 
southwestern Cayuga Lake
White-crowned Sparrow - count week (I don't know how many, where, when, or by 
whom) 


These species have been found in previous counts, but are missing from this 
year's count. Some were flukes not expected again, others may be in the circle 
or elsewhere in the Cayuga Lake Basin. Please report these birds if you find 
them, especially if you find them in or near the count circle this Wednesday, 
Thursday or Friday, so we can include them as Count Week birds:

Greater White-fronted Goose
Ross's Goose
Brant
Mute Swan
Wood Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Green-winged Teal
King Eider
Red-breasted Merganser
Northern Bobwhite
Ring-necked Pheasant
Red-throated Loon
Horned Grebe
Red-necked Grebe
Green Heron
Osprey
Red-shouldered Hawk
Golden Eagle
Killdeer
Wilson's Snipe
Bonaparte's Gull
Snowy Owl
Long-eared Owl
Short-eared Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
American Three-toed Woodpecker
Eastern Phoebe
Boreal Chickadee
House Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Hermit Thrush
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher - unverified count week report on South Hill
Bohemian Waxwing
Ovenbird 
Orange-crowned Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow Warbler
Pine Warbler
Green-tailed Towhee
Eastern Towhee
Chipping Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Grasshopper

[cayugabirds-l] Mongo

2012-11-06 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings Cayugabirders,

This is a sentimental post for a large farm Mallard that was furtively released 
on the main pond at Sapsucker Woods back in the 1990s, when I was formally 
associate with the Lab of O when it was lodged in the old building with a 
staff of 50 or so. There were a few mallards that lived on the pond year-round 
and one was larger, a domestic hybrid of some sort. I realize “Mongo” has 
likely long ago passed to humus, but I wonder if anyone has recollections of 
this fine individual and if there is any knowledge of his fate?

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] The Loon Watch – 1st notable push

2012-11-03 Thread Bill Evans
Just wanted to mention also that Ethan has found lodging and that this year the 
watch is being conducted at the north pier of Taughannock Falls State Park.  
The old count location at the south pier has been fenced off and inaccessible 
for several years. To get to the north pier from Ithaca, take the first right 
after you cross the creek on rte 89.

Bill E


From: Ethan Kistler 
Sent: Friday, November 02, 2012 11:44 AM
To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] The Loon Watch – 1st notable push

Hi all,

Today’s northwesterly winds produced the first notable push of Common Loons 
over Cayuga Lake. 
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[cayugabirds-l] Taughannock loon watch

2012-10-28 Thread Bill Evans
North pier count site, 7:40-9:30AM EDT
North wind 10-15 mph, 45 F with low cloud ceiling (~1400-ft asl) and occasional 
drizzle. 
Surprisingly little bird movement:
12 Common Loon (1 southbound; 11 northbound)
~100 southbound cormorants in three flocks
~70 southbound Canada Geese in three flocks
2 White-winged Scoters (low in northbound flight)
1 Black Scoter (low in southbound flight)
6 Bufflehead (low flight south then north)
A few small flocks of mallards and similar-sized puddlers
No gull or passerine migration; a few crows crossing the lake
-Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] siskins now - great egret night flight calls tonight - DDT then now

2012-09-27 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings birders:

Right now there are a few siskins feeding in cedar trees on Green St. adjacent 
to Agway.

The timing and conditions look good for hearing great egret night flight calls 
tonight. My past experience suggests that 8:30-10PM is the window to hear 
egrets, presumably individuals originating from the southern Lake Ontario 
marshes. I’m unable to go up to Mt Pleasant tonight for a listen but perhaps 
others can – should be a great night for listening with lots of migrants aloft!

Today is the 50th anniversary of the publication of Rachael Carson’s Silent 
Spring. For a reflective read, check out the article Insecticides and Birds, 
which was presented orally to the National Audubon Society in November 1958, 
later published in Audubon Magazine (Jan-Feb 1959), and reprinted in the WI 
Ornithological Society’s Journal: The Passenger Pigeon (linked article). The 
article details how a serendipitous American Robin study on the University of 
Michigan campus in Lansing, MI documented the decimation of the local breeding 
American Robin population due to spraying of DDT over the campus to treat Dutch 
Elm Disease.

For an excellent recent reflection on DDT, Rachel Carson, and our modern toxic 
stew, see Paul Ehrlich’s piece linked below:
http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2012/commentary-paul-ehrlich-on-rachel-carson

-Bill E
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] [nfc-l] migrating cuckoos

2012-06-07 Thread Bill Evans
There’s a delightful old paper by Gerald Thayer describing the mid-summer, 
mid-night, mid-sky gyrations of the Black-billed Cuckoo, as noted by my father 
and me for three consecutive seasons in the southwestern corner of New 
Hampshire:

”Several years before we discovered the nocturnal-flight phenomenon, we began 
to be puzzled by the extreme frequency of Cuckoo calls on summer nights. 
***They uttered both the cow-row notes and the rolling guttural call; but the 
guttural was much the commoner of the two, except on dark, foggy nights, when 
the case was usually reversed. ***The birds were often so far up as to be only 
faintly audible when directly overhead, with no obstructions interposed; and 
this on a still night would seem to mean an elevation of at least a hundred and 
fifty yards. They sometimes flew lower, however, and on cloudy nights often 
moved about barely above the tree-tops.”

“On the evening of July 11-a pitch-dark evening with a thundershower 
lowering,-they were remarkably noisy, both sitting in trees and flying high in 
air. The seated ones, of which I heard only two, made the Cowcow notes, while 
all the flying ones made the liquid gurgle. I heard this note overhead between 
thirty and forty times in the course of about three hours, during half of which 
time I was afoot on the road.”

-- Thayer, G. H. 1903. The Mystery of the Black-billed Cuckoo. Bird Lore 
5:143-145. 

In a big nocturnal flight I heard moving up the St. Croix River (MN/WI) in late 
May of 1985, I estimated a rate of passage of Black-billed Cuckoos in the range 
of 100 per hour for at least a few hours in the middle of the night. This was 
not a call total but a rate of vocal birds estimated by following multiple 
calls from apparently the same individual, and it was clear that these birds 
were migrants heading northbound. In 1988-1990 I began recording nocturnal 
flight calls each fall migration period in early July around Ithaca, NY and was 
surprised that in each season the highest rate of BBCU calling was in July 
through early August. There seemed to be a lot of variability in the number of 
calls I recorded between proximal nights, which could be a function of 
weather/wind and microphone pickup dynamics or that the birds tended to prefer 
some nights over others. In the big passerine push from mid –August through 
mid-September across central NY, BBCU flight calls are less common than one 
might expect. Using a Sennheiser shotgun mic back in those days, my rates of 
BBCU nocturnal flight call detection in the latter half of August were in the 
1-2 per hour range (averaged over whole night). In the first half of September 
rates dropped to the range of one call every four hours. Whereas in July 
through early August it was common to record sustained rate through the night 
of 4-5 per hour. But as I mentioned there was a lot of variability from night 
to night.

I haven’t recorded much in June in central NY, but my impression has been that 
the breeding ground flight calling,  the “mid-summer, mid-night, mid-sky, 
gyrations”,  is a phenomenon that increases in July.

Bill E  
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[cayugabirds-l] Trip to Braddock Bay

2012-04-17 Thread Bill Evans
Ronda Roaring is looking for 3 people max to share gas expenses to Braddock Bay 
Raptor Research, Braddock Bay Bird Observatory and Hamlin Beach State Park this 
Saturday, 4/21. Leave early from the Lab of O or other nearby spot. Anyone 
interested email or phone rondaroaring at hotmail dot com, 589-4031.


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Communication Towers and Migratory Bird Routes

2012-03-29 Thread Bill Evans
Lisa,

Unlike for commercial wind energy, there are no specific NY guidelines for 
minimizing avian impacts of communcations towers (i.e., nothing from NYDEC).

The Federal guidelines put forth by the USFWS are pertinent for NY and can be 
found at the following link: 
http://www.fws.gov/habitatconservation/communicationtowers.html

Generally, towers should be kept as far away from the shores of Lake Ontario as 
possible, due to occasional large migratory bird concentrations there. Towers 
located within ~3 miles of the shoreline should be free-standing (no guy wires) 
and as short as possible. Towers should not be built near sources of bright 
permanent light (sports stadiums, convenient stores, etc.), which may lead to 
dense bird aggregations of disoriented birds on cloudy nights. Towers should 
use flashing (not steady-burning) aviation obstruction lighting if possible.

Bill Evans
www.towerkill.com

  - Original Message - 
  From: Lisa Welch 
  To: Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2012 9:39 AM
  Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Communication Towers and Migratory Bird Routes


  Hello,


  I am a planner with Syracuse-Onondaga County Planning Agency and I'm 
researching migratory bird (or otherwise) regulatory requirements and/or 
recommended practices for proposed and existing towers.


  Can anyone recommend a definitive guide for NYS?


  Thanks.
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Communication Towers and Migratory Bird Routes

2012-03-29 Thread Bill Evans
Lisa,

There are no other migratory concentration zones as well recognized in NY as 
shoreline regions. There are other geographic dynamics that cause migratory 
bird concentrations, such as long ridgelines (for migratory raptors especially) 
and box canyons (for night migrants especially) but there are no documented 
sites I am aware of for these other concentration dynamics in the 
Syracuse-Onondaga region.

The concentrations of waterfowl at Montezuma would not be considered actively 
migrating as much as staging (migratory birds taking a pit stop). The FCC has 
Environmental Assessment rules that may limit tower construction within MNWR 
boundaries but I think there is a gray area for building towers in proximity to 
such preserves. Ideally there should be a buffer zone for tower construction 
around NWRs (depending on tower height).  However, the scientific grounding for 
such a zone is scant and would be more a precautionary gesture.

From what I've seen, communications towers and wind farms are being built with 
little regard for many IBAs (e.g. new wind farm on Wolfe Island Ontario). It 
seems human infrastructure can trump previously recognized wildlife zones in 
many cases. A lot depends on public awareness/support for the IBA and the 
nature of the intrusion, for example whether it is a 200-ft cell tower or 
1000-ft TV tower.

So, to answer your question, yes it is true in some cases and it should ideally 
be true in many other cases.

Bill
  - Original Message - 
  From: Lisa Welch 
  To: Bill Evans ; cayugabirds 
  Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2012 10:51 AM
  Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Communication Towers and Migratory Bird Routes


  Thanks Bill,


  Wouldn't this be true of other recognized migratory routes, wildlife 
refugees, or IBA, etc, for example, Montezuma?




--
  From: Bill Evans wrev...@clarityconnect.com
  To: Lisa Welch welch_m_l...@yahoo.com; cayugabirds 
cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu 
  Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2012 10:16 AM
  Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Communication Towers and Migratory Bird Routes



  Lisa,

  Unlike for commercial wind energy, there are no specific NY guidelines for 
minimizing avian impacts of communcations towers (i.e., nothing from NYDEC).

  The Federal guidelines put forth by the USFWS are pertinent for NY and can be 
found at the following link: 
http://www.fws.gov/habitatconservation/communicationtowers.html

  Generally, towers should be kept as far away from the shores of Lake Ontario 
as possible, due to occasional large migratory bird concentrations there. 
Towers located within ~3 miles of the shoreline should be free-standing (no guy 
wires) and as short as possible. Towers should not be built near sources of 
bright permanent light (sports stadiums, convenient stores, etc.), which may 
lead to dense bird aggregations of disoriented birds on cloudy nights. Towers 
should use flashing (not steady-burning) aviation obstruction lighting if 
possible.

  Bill Evans
  www.towerkill.com

- Original Message - 
From: Lisa Welch 
To: Cayugabirds-L@cornell.edu 
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2012 9:39 AM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Communication Towers and Migratory Bird Routes


Hello,


I am a planner with Syracuse-Onondaga County Planning Agency and I'm 
researching migratory bird (or otherwise) regulatory requirements and/or 
recommended practices for proposed and existing towers.


Can anyone recommend a definitive guide for NYS?


Thanks.
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] BLUE-WINGED TEAL Montezuma NWR Visitor

2012-03-13 Thread Bill Evans
Dave's post reminded me that I heard numerous flocks of Blue-winged Teal and 
other waterfowl over the high terrain of Danby during the windless quietude 
Sunday night. Notable in the mix was an emotionally-stirring flock of 
Long-tailed Ducks.


Turn on, tune in, bird out,

Bill E 





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[cayugabirds-l] Merlin eating House Sparrow

2012-01-27 Thread Bill Evans
9:45AM atop a Green St. telephone pole next to Agway parkinglot.

Bill E
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] NYSEG seeks help restoring Portland Point Osprey nest site

2012-01-18 Thread Bill Evans
Robyn,

Nice initiative!

Here's a link with pictures and contact info for the Treman Marina Osprey 
platform that NYSEG voluntarily put up in 2009.

http://www.ilovethefingerlakes.com/recreation/stateparks-tremanmarina-ospreynest.htm

-Bill E
  - Original Message - 
  From: Robyn Bailey 
  To: Dave Nutter ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
  Cc: Stephen W. Kress 
  Sent: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 8:48 AM
  Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] NYSEG seeks help restoring Portland Point Osprey 
nest site


  Thank you all for your input and support! Ron Rohrbaugh has agreed to advise 
NYSEG on the project, and Alan Poole (The Osprey Man) also may get involved. 
I will help in whatever way I can, of course. I will facilitate a conversation 
with the right people, and we should be able to move forward soon hopefully. 

   

  To answer Dave's question, I think it will be possible to erect a platform of 
a plastic (nonconductive) material right above the old nest location. It will 
need to be far enough up that there is no chance of electricity arcing to the 
nest. However, the pole was also burned, and I'm not sure what the extent of 
the damage is. If the same post is not possible, they may have some 
decommissioned poles that might be repurposed into a free-standing Osprey 
platform. In the Big Flats area, they erected an old pole for an Eagle Scout 
who did all of the construction/design work.

   

  Some of you have informed me of NYSEG-aided Osprey platforms in the 
surrounding areas (Auburn, Big Flats), and the appropriate contacts are now 
being reached about how they went about it. (It's worth noting that they are 
responding quickly!) It is so inspiring to see our birding community get behind 
this, and even have the different NYSEG divisions talking to each other about 
their independent Osprey circumstances. Keep in mind that storm season is upon 
us, and while I hope that March is a reasonable goal, it all depends on 
cooperative weather.

   

  Thank you all for your contributions and such productive conversations!

  Robyn Bailey

   

   

  From: bounce-39148249-15067...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-39148249-15067...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dave Nutter
  Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 8:13 PM
  To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
  Cc: Stephen W. Kress
  Subject: [cayugabirds-l] NYSEG seeks help restoring Portland Point Osprey 
nest site

   

  Thanks for the news. What a great opportunity!  Please help if you have 
knowledge or contacts. 

   

  I can understand NYSEG not liking fires atop their poles, especially with 
transformers, and Cargill not liking operations to be interrupted by flaming 
nests. Would they be interested in a platform higher on the same pole to 
separate the nest better from the wires, or are they considering putting up a 
separate pole in the vicinity with a nest platform? I suspect that the closer 
the new platform is to the original nest site, the more likely it is to be 
used. From a public relations and birding standpoint, it would be good if the 
nest were visible from the public road in a place where people can pull over in 
a car and not be in the way of Cargill's trucks. The previous site worked 
fairly well, I thought, but I was mostly there on weekends when there were no 
trucks, and Cargill may have a different opinion. They might like to have a 
small gravel pull-off on the shoulder for one or two cars for the public to see 
their operations - an amazing sight in itself - and the Osprey nest in the 
middle of it. 

   

  I don't know what types of Osprey nest platforms are most successful - I've 
seen many go unused for unknown reasons.  I believe the pole and platform at 
Treman Marine Park, which saw some Osprey interest last year after several 
initial barren years, was coordinated by Bill Evans (who I think is on this 
list) and Ronda Roaring (who may not be).  Perhaps Bard Prentiss (also on this 
list?) knows about or was involved in putting up a platform at Dryden Lake.  
Perhaps Steve Kress (cc) has contacts or info, too.  I hope they or others 
among the many people at the Lab with related experience, expertise, or 
contacts step forward.  

   

  This should be figured out pronto. The Ospreys will return in late March, and 
the first thing they are likely to do is start putting sticks atop that same 
pole unless there's a more attractive alternative close by.

   

  --Dave Nutter

   

   


  On Jan 17, 2012, at 12:19 PM, Robyn Bailey rb...@cornell.edu wrote:

I spoke to the NYSEG lead forester for the Ithaca region (my fiancé) about 
the Osprey nest. I have a vested interest because this Cargill property abuts 
our own, meaning I could have Osprey on my yard list. J  So, here is the scoop.

 

This past fall, the nest made contact with the lines and sparked a fire. 
The fire department and line crews responded appropriately to put out the fire, 
but sadly the nest could not be saved. NYSEG is willing to provide a riser and 
possibly the bucket

[cayugabirds-l] Redheads

2012-01-11 Thread Bill Evans
I stopped down at Hog Hole late afternoon yesterday and also roughly 
estimated 3000-4000 Redheads in the group.


Bill E


there must have been three to four
thousand ducks in the air. 





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[cayugabirds-l] Merlin prey

2011-12-07 Thread Bill Evans
Merlins regularly prey on exhausted warblers approaching shore (low over the 
water) after a night of transoceanic migration.


Bill E 





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[cayugabirds-l] Merlin

2011-12-06 Thread Bill Evans
There was a merlin bathing in a puddle of water near the Cass Park pool last 
week.


Bill E 





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Re:[cayugabirds-l] [nfc-l] big night flight tonight

2011-09-21 Thread Bill Evans
Ken appears to have tuned into one of the biggest calling night of the 
season so far in central NY.  The acoustic station at Alfred Station, NY 
logged its season high number (988) of warbler and sparrow flight calls last 
night between 8:30PM-5:30AM. Based on spectrographic analysis roughly 4 out 
of 100 were Common Yellowthroat, 2 out of 100 were Black-throated Blue, and 
2 out of 100 were Chestnut-sided. Also notably in the mix were good numbers 
of presumed Lincoln's Sparrow calls.


Bill E





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Re:[cayugabirds-l] [nfc-l] big night flight tonight

2011-09-21 Thread Bill Evans

Ken,
I'm not confident in separting Lincoln's and Swamp either, but last night 
was the first night this season that such calls were fairly abundant and I 
presume they were Lincoln's due to that species' earlier fall migration 
pattern in the region (based on diurnal records).


Your listening site is over 100 miles east of the Alfred Station microphone, 
so you undoubtedly had somewhat different species composition -- in the case 
of Black-throated Blue one might expect higher proportionate calling rate as 
one proceeds eastward in the state.


That said, there were also a lot of short Vermivora calls in the mix last 
night, perhaps the first substantial wave of Nashville's. All the calls from 
last night are downloadable at:

http://www.oldbird.org/Data/States/NY/Alfred/fall2011/Alfred2011f.htm

Bill



- Original Message - 
From: Kenneth Victor Rosenberg k...@cornell.edu

To: Bill Evans wrev...@clarityconnect.com
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu; NFC-L 
nf...@list.cornell.edu

Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2011 11:18 AM
Subject: Re: [nfc-l] big night flight tonight


Thanks Bill. I did hear a few typical Lincoln's/Swamp sparrow dts 
but was not confident enough to report. If there were that few 
Black-throated Blues, I'm curious what most of the abrupt tsip notes might 
have been? There were certainly way fewer of what I would consider typical 
buzzy Dendroica-type zeet notes than what I'm used to hearing on most 
nights.


KEN


Ken Rosenberg
Conservation Science Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
607-254-2412
607-342-4594 (cell)
k...@cornell.edu

On Sep 21, 2011, at 9:55 AM, Bill Evans wrote:

Ken appears to have tuned into one of the biggest calling night of the 
season so far in central NY.  The acoustic station at Alfred Station, NY 
logged its season high number (988) of warbler and sparrow flight calls 
last night between 8:30PM-5:30AM. Based on spectrographic analysis roughly 
4 out of 100 were Common Yellowthroat, 2 out of 100 were Black-throated 
Blue, and 2 out of 100 were Chestnut-sided. Also notably in the mix were 
good numbers of presumed Lincoln's Sparrow calls.


Bill E





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[cayugabirds-l] An interesting art exhibit involving birds - public reception Thursday.

2011-09-13 Thread Bill Evans
Carla Stetson: Ornithography

The Gallery at FOUND is pleased to welcome a new show by CARLA STETSON. The 
exhibit opens Wednesday, September 14th, with an artist's reception on 
Thursday, September 15th from 5-7 pm. You are invited to meet the artist and 
enjoy light refreshments and tasty treats. The show will be on display in the 
Gallery through October 20th.

Stetson's mixed media prints are characterized by transformation. Unlikely 
elements combine into new and hybrid entities. She works with a broad range of 
techniques and media, from mixed media works on paper to large-scale 
installations. She has taught art for many years to all ages of students and 
now teaches art studio classes and art education at Ithaca College.

The Gallery at FOUND is an intimate art space located within FOUND in Ithaca, 
the area's newest antique and vintage marketplace. The gallery showcases works 
of local artists who utilize found imagery, found objects or employ an 
up-cycling philosophy in their work. FOUND will remain open during the artist's 
reception. Come browse through 7,000 square feet of great finds!

FOUND is located along the inlet behind Wegmans at 227 Cherry Street. Open 
every day except Tuesday, 10-6. For more information call 607-319-5078 or visit 
our website at
 
http://foundinithaca.com/events/carla-stetson/


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[cayugabirds-l] post front arrivals

2011-09-06 Thread Bill Evans
I visited the white lighthouse jetty from 7:30-7:45AM this morning. No active 
migration of waterbirds was noted but I did find a RUDDY TURNSTONE and SOLITARY 
SANDPIPER near the beginning of the jetty on the east side. I note also that 
the city golf course has areas of standing water hosting many grazing waterfowl 
(including 15 Blue-winged Teal).

Conditions look good for grounding interesting waterbirds on the lake  
vicinity this next day or so.

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Wolfe Island Short-eareds (was Woodcock)

2011-08-18 Thread Bill Evans
On Wolfe Island, a nest of Short-eareds with five chicks was plowed under by 
a farmer who had a turbine on his property. It has been widely surmised that 
he did so because he thought it would affect his annual paycheck for leasing 
space to the wind company. As far as I know he has not acknowledged doing so 
but it happened only a week or so after pictures of the nest and its 
location hit the media.


There is a note in the recent issue of the Kingston Field Naturalist's 
journal, The Blue Bill,  that has a number of discussions on wind power, 
some of which regard Wolfe Island Wind Project, and another regarding a wind 
farm siting that would be very deadly to birds on the Point Edward Peninsula

http://kingstonfieldnaturalists.org/bluebill/bb-jun11.pdf

I quote from page 35 of that document:
Kurt Hennige's presentation of monitoring efforts of the Short-eared Owl - 
carried out for decades by members of the Kingston Field Naturalists on 
Wolfe and Amherst Islands - reached a different conclusion about the impact 
of the Wolfe Island wind plant. Hennige's findings strongly suggest that the 
distribution of Shorteared Owl on Wolfe Island has changed because of the 
wind plant - they no longer occupy the area around the
turbines that have been their core wintering grounds for decades. The 
Short-eared Owl, a species that has declined steadily over the past 40 
years, is listed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in 
Canada (COSEWIC) as Special Concern.


--Bill E




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Re: [cayugabirds-l] S-b Dowitcher, Black-bellied Plovers - MNWR Sunday

2011-06-28 Thread Bill Evans
I recall birding in southern Minnesota in my youth and the date June 17 
sticks in my mind as when we would get out to look for the first returning 
Lesser Yellowlegs.


Based on the shorebird resource compiled by Kelling, it appears that 
Black-bellied Plover is the most unusual of the recent shorebird reports.


Bill E


- Original Message - 
From: Geo Kloppel geoklop...@gmail.com

To: cayugabirdlist L cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Sent: Tuesday, June 28, 2011 1:45 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] S-b Dowitcher, Black-bellied Plovers - MNWR 
Sunday



If you Google shorebirds + failed breeders you'll get a lot of
hits, and you'll see the word 'presumed' again and again. The Ontario
Field Ornithologists website offers a more cautious assessment:

 Failed Breeders: Most adult shorebirds do not stay long on the
breeding grounds after nest failure or loss of chicks. Some very
early or earlier than normal first migrants in full alternate
(breeding) plumage may be failed breeders. However, adults of most
species appear at the same time every year suggesting that the
“failed breeders” explanation is questionable in many cases.

http://www.ofo.ca/reportsandarticles/southboundshorebirds.php

When deciding how early is early enough in the Cayuga Basin to risk
floating the failed breeder explanation, Steve Kelling's shorebird
bar chart might be useful:

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/cayugabirdclub/firstrecords/shorebirds.htm

-Geo


Geo Kloppel
Bowmaker  Restorer
227 Tupper Road
Spencer NY 14883

607 564 7026
g...@cornell.edu
geoklop...@gmail.com




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[cayugabirds-l] Barn Owl

2011-04-29 Thread Bill Evans
Recorded in flight over my house in Danby (near Jennings Pond) last night about 
4:15AM  -- also, notable numbers of Grasshopper Sparrow flight calls the past 
two nights.

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Caspians in Danby

2011-04-17 Thread Bill Evans
At 7:40AM this morning there were 14 CASPIAN TERNS foraging at Jennings Pond 
off Bald Hill Rd. in the Town of Danby. They weren't there yesterday late 
afternoon and they likely got caught in transit up from the mid-Atlantic by the 
wind shift last night -- I suspect there are such temporary visitors at other 
water bodies across the region this morning. These individuals are likely 
headed up to the breeding colony (~1800 pairs) on Galloo Island in northeastern 
Lake Ontario.

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] Crow with Salamander

2011-04-04 Thread Bill Evans
Lot of crow talk this morning so I thought I'd share an observation.  While 
driving on Sandbank Rd. this morning,  I saw a crow in the road pecking at 
something then fly off with what appeared to be a large dark salamander, 
presumably a Spotted.

Bill E


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[cayugabirds-l] Conn Hill 15Mar11 - migration

2011-03-15 Thread Bill Evans
From a vista on the south side of Conn Hill today (10:30-12:30  2:00-4:00).

Geese (Snows, Canadas): passage of 1000+ per 15 minutes from 10:30-noon; then a 
notably denser pulse between noon and 12:30PM.  From 2PM-4PM rate was 1000 per 
hour. Mean flight direction ~NNW. ~Mean altitude est. between 2000-4000 ft agl.

Turkey Vulture: 4 apparent migrants S to N (also 4+ locals)
Red-tailed Hawk: 4 apparent migrants SW to NE (also 6+ locals)
Red-shouldered Hawk: 1 not migrating
Unid. buteo: 3 apparent migrants (one possibly a dark Rough-legged)
Cooper's Hawk: 1 (exhibiting display flight)
Merlin: 1 migrant S to N
Am. Kestrel: 1 migrant S to N
Unid. small falcon: 1 migrant S to N

note: this site is in the field at the north end of Black Oak Rd. (near met 
tower). It has excellent visibility to the west but the east vector is limited 
-- overall perhaps 60% the circumvisibility of the Mt. Pleasant watch site.

--Bill E
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the game farm?

2011-03-03 Thread Bill Evans
What I guess we don't know is what proportion of their diet it pheasant 
versus rodent.



- Original Message - 
From: Linda Orkin wingmagi...@gmail.com

To: Chris Tessaglia-Hymes c...@cornell.edu
Cc: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 4:11 PM
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the 
game farm?



Yes. I totally agree Chris. And what a totally unnatural environment and 
conditions, with those blinders on and totally exposed to all inclement 
weather.


Linda

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 3, 2011, at 4:03 PM, Chris Tessaglia-Hymes c...@cornell.edu wrote:

Wouldn't these Red-tailed Hawks primarily be targeting the weak or sick; 
the

ones that might die off (in this unnatural environment) anyway?

--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp



-Original Message-
From: bounce-8672169-3488...@list.cornell.edu
[mailto:bounce-8672169-3488...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Tim 
Gallagher

Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 3:19 PM
To: cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the
game farm?

I've seen red-tails eating pheasants there several times, and the people 
who

work there have told me that they often see them catch them.

Tim Gallagher
Editor-in-Chief
LIVING BIRD
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, New York 14850
(607) 254-2443
t...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-8672008-10557...@list.cornell.edu
[bounce-8672008-10557...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Bill Evans
[wrev...@clarityconnect.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2011 2:47 PM
To: cayugabirds-l
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Why don't RTHA eat all the pheasants at the
game farm?

Has anyone ever seen a hawk take/eat a pheasant at the game farm?

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] CayugaRBA BLACK VULTURE perched 77

2011-01-28 Thread Bill Evans

Wow.  Perhaps the first perched Black Vulture ever reported in the CBasin.

Bill E



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] 5000 blackbirds and starlings fall from the sky!

2011-01-04 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings birders,

This kill has all the signs of an aggregation event caused by artificial 
lighting emanating from the residential area where the kill was found. Whatever 
flushed the birds (fireworks, cannons or lightning), once they were in the air 
it is likely that the easiest cue for orientation was the lights of the nearest 
residential area. The birds would tend to stay in that lighted airspace instead 
flying into the darkness with no orientation cues, and I guess a dense 
aggregation with mixed-direction flight occurred and led to lots of midair 
collisions. There were no dead birds reported from the site where the birds had 
been roosting and it is likely that the kill wouldn't have occurred (or would 
have been much smaller) if there were no lights in the vicinity of the roost. 
The cloud ceiling was 100% overcast and the refraction of light off the bottom 
of the could ceiling may have contributed to creating a distinctly lighted 
airspace that birds concentrated within.

The reported internal hemorraghing found in the salvaged carcasses could be 
partly from the midair collisions but more likely from falling bird impacts 
with the ground.  I was out at the 850-ft Elmira TV tower one night a decade 
ago with two Cornell students while disoriented warblers were striking the 
tower's guy wires (or other birds) and falling to the TV station parking lot 
below. I distinctly remember the loud smack sound on the pavement within a few 
feet of us of a Red-eyed Vireo and a Black-throated Green Warbler. Small birds 
falling to the ground from 500+ ft in the air really hit the ground with quite 
a bit of force.

Bill E

- Original Message - 
  From: Regi Teasley 
  To: cayugabird...@cornell.e 
  Sent: Tuesday, January 04, 2011 10:37 AM
  Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] 5000 blackbirds and starlings fall from the sky!


  Regarding the blackbirds killed.

   There was a brief story about this on NPR.  The fish and game fellow said he 
didn't think it was a storm after all.  He was coming to think it was fireworks 
(cannons) celebrating New Year's Eve that frightened the roosting birds.  
Apparently, when they flew at night in their fear, they crashed into things.  
Their injuries were blunt force injuries.
   If so, once again humans blithely blunder around destroying nature in 
the process.  Pathetic.  Change is in order.
  Regi

  At 09:08 PM 1/3/2011, you wrote:

Yes, I read about this on Sat.. I get the local, world  national news from 
various newspaper sources on my computer. I found it interesting but didn't 
know if it would be acceptable to post so didn't. Today about 500 dead birds, 
starlings, grackles  blackbirds were found outside New Roads, AL.
 
Fritzie Blizzard
 
 
Stephanie Greenwood wrote on Monday, January 03, 2011 8:27 PM





  Subject: [cayugabirds-l] 5000 blackbirds and starlings fall from the sky!


  I was just shocked when a friend I met for dinner this evening told me 
about this story. Have any of you heard about this?

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[cayugabirds-l] Avian towerkill -- the good news

2011-01-04 Thread Bill Evans

Greetings all,

I thought I'd follow up the depressing news of the big blackbird kill in 
Arkansas with a bit of positive news regarding the long standing problem of 
bird kills at communications towers. First, the Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) is currently holding another public comment period on the 
issue. This stems from a lawsuit led by the American Bird Conservancy  
Forest Conservation Council, and a decision by the D.C. Circuit Court that 
prevented the FCC (under pressure from corporate lobbying) from dismissing 
the avian towerkill issue. Second, behind the scenes the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) has conducted tests and found it no longer necessary 
for towers taller than 350-ft to have steady-burning lights, which are a 
primary factor in causing bird kills at towers. Tower owners apparently will 
soon be able to switch off these steady-burning lights (just having flashing 
lights) and save electricity and maintance costs while also preventing the 
needless slaughter of perhaps 100s of thousands of night migrating songbirds 
across the US annually. This is a simple win-win situation that took more 
than a decade to bring about, and appears close to becoming a reality.


While comments submitted during the previous FCC comment periods regarding 
this issue are still in play, this current comment period regards input on 
whether the FCC should conduct a programmatic Environmental Impact 
Assessment (EIS) on its Antennae Structure Registration program. The answer 
is clearly yes, because the avian towerkill issue is not as much site 
specific as it involves all towers -- the impact to birds is cumulative and 
the primary mitigation would involve a change in aviation obstruction 
lighting regulations for all towers. The FCC currently abides by an 
Environmental Assessment (EA) program on a tower by tower basis, but this 
does not address cumulative impacts. Elevating the environmental review of 
the FCC's antennae structure regulation program to an EIS would help assure 
that the avian towerkill issue gets the appropriate mitigative attention for 
cumulative impacts. [e.g., by some estimates, more than 1% of the Cerulean 
Warbler population is killed at towers annually]


So, one of the more significant direct conservation actions for songbirds is 
before us right now and the comment period ends in 10 days. One of the 
easiest ways to support this effort is to sign the petition at the Defenders 
of Wildlife webpage 
https://secure.defenders.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=displaypage=UserActionid=1769


As with other issues involving Federal Agencies and big corporations, 
success in instituting strong environmental regulations is dependent upon 
teamwork of large conservation organizations -- in this case American Bird 
Conservancy, Defenders of Wildlife, Forest Conservation Council, and 
National Audubon Society are all worthy of our support.


For those with more time you can find out more information and submit your 
own comments directly to the FCC at: http://www.fcc.gov/pea  All comments 
submitted to the FCC on this issue since 2003 are available on the FCC 
webpage http://fjallfoss.fcc.gov/prod/ecfs/comsrch_v2.cgi entering 03-187 in 
box #1, and then clicking the Retrieve Document List button. If you go back 
a few years you can read comments by several current and former members of 
the Cayugabirds-L community including Marie Read and Dan Lebbin.


Finally, anyone who does take the time to submit a formal comment to the FCC 
will be cordially invited to a party at my house this spring with gratis 
Nines pizza and beer.


Yours in bird,

Bill Evans





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[cayugabirds-l] Loon flight

2010-11-19 Thread Bill Evans
I counted over 1000 loons in southbound flight from near Agway in downtown 
Ithaca this morning. The flight was en masse (1000+ feet above ground level) 
when I arrived at ~8AM and it appeared most had passed when I stopped 
counting at 8:20AM. The groups were large, some formations stretching 100 
birds wide.  I guess this might have been a 3000+ day at Tunghannock State 
Park.


Bill E 





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[cayugabirds-l] Gender Patterns in Bird-related Recreation in the USA and UK

2010-10-25 Thread Bill Evans
Cooper, C. B., and J. A. Smith. 2010. Gender patterns in bird-related 
recreation in the USA and UK. Ecology and Society 15(4): 4.

[online] URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol15/iss4/art4/


From the paper's abstract:


Observing birds encompassed both a recreational hobby, bird watching, that 
was female biased in the USA, and a competitive sport, birding, that was 
heavily male biased among adults, but not youth, in both the USA and UK. 
Because of differences in gender participation in bird-related activities, 
fostering both competitive and noncompetitive bird-related activities is 
necessary to increase the likelihood of bringing larger segments of the 
population into nature-based recreation.


*
Bill E







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[cayugabirds-l] Out of Basin but interesting

2010-10-19 Thread Bill Evans
 Wolfe Island: Vermilon Flycatcher
 From: Bruce Di Labio bruce.dilabio AT sympatico.ca
 Date: Thu, 14 Oct 2010 21:39:20 -0400
 
 Hello Ontbirders
 With birding and our recent technology, the internet, anything is possible! 
 Through eBird I found out that there was a male Vermilion Flycatcher 
 photographed on Wolfe Island yesterday, October 13th. The bird was observed 
 fly 
 catching south east of the intersection of Bennett Road and 7th line Road on 
 wolfe Island. So far no further reports. If anyone has additional information 
 on this observation please let Ontbirds know. 
 
 Good Birding, Bruce
 
 Directions: Wolfe Island is located off of Kingston and the ferry is located 
 along the waterfront. 
 
 Di Labio Birding Website
 Courses and Field Trips
 http://www.dilabiobirding.ca
 http://www.brucedilabio.blogspot.com
 
 Bruce Di Labio
 400 Donald B. Munro Drive
 P.O. Box 538
 Carp, Ontario
 K0A 1L0 
 Office 613-839-4395 Mobile 613-715-2571

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[cayugabirds-l] Listening on Mt. Pleasant tonight

2010-09-17 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings,

Forecast is for clear skies and a light north wind early tonight. There may be 
some birds migrating early on, though I don't expect a huge flight. For anyone 
interested, I'll be up in the near vicinity of the Mount Pleasent Observatory 
(top of Mt. Pleasant Rd. a few miles east of Ithaca, NY) by 9PM and will have 
two audio stations available for listeners. It might be a good night to learn 
the night flight calls of Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Swainson's and Gray-cheeked 
Thrush, and some of the more distinctive warblers as they pass southward toward 
the tropics for the winter. 

If you come up, dress warmly and please drive carefully in the vicinity of the 
observatory as there may be people wandering about and cars turning around.  
Parking is on the shoulder of Mt. Pleasant Rd.

Should be a beautiful evening in any case, and I'm told Uranus will be visible 
with binoculars (and perhaps by eye) to the right of Jupiter. I'll be there 
until at least 11PM, later if the migration is good.

Bill Evans


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[cayugabirds-l] Night on the Mount

2010-09-17 Thread Bill Evans
Great night listening up on Mount Pleasant tonight. Surprising large flight.  
Most birds were high and the calls were faint to the ear but listening via the 
micorphone was amazing.  Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and Swainson's Thrush I think 
predonminated for us with many zeeps and tsips of warblers.  We also had a 
thermal imager and after it cleared it became extraordinary seeing the 
magnitude of the flow that was actually moving over us.  The wind had turned 
light southerly by 11PM and I would expect there will be a nice selection of 
new migrants about Ithaca over the weekend.

Good birding to all,

Bill E
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[cayugabirds-l] 1998

2010-06-22 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings Cayugabirders,

Apologies for the lack of field reports the past decade. I'm still trying to 
understand what happened and where the time went, but I don't recall seeing 
anything too noteworthy. I remember Ned Brinkley, Cayuga Basin birder 
extraordinaire in the early 1990s, saying he always got a rare bird when he was 
depressed or in need, and I love  often reflect upon that sort of interspecial 
pyschic connection (e.g. presumably as in the nature connection of the native 
american Cherokee Tribes  their kin). 

In my progression away from Basin birding it seemed my calling perhaps was not 
specifically for rare birds but addressing needless slaughter of birds. I 
recall posting to this listserv on the issue of bird mortality at 
communications towers in early 1998 and soon after forming the website 
towerkill.com with Bernie Guirey of Horseheads, NY. 

For those interested, we have just updated the maps and data on tower farms in 
North America at the website www.towerkill.com so you can see the growth in 
tower numbers according to North American sector's of political meat. Simply 
stated, the slaughter of night migrating birds continues at TV  communications 
towers -- but there is some hope via the American Bird Conservancy's (ABC) 
lawsuit against our government's Federal Communications Commission (which 
regulates communications towers). It is clear to me over the past decade that 
ABC is an exemplary North American ornithological organization supporting 
preservation of our remaining avian populations. Please consider supporting ABC 
www.abcbirds.org/ to ameliorate a largely unknown millions of bird deaths at 
communications towers annually.

Bill Evans
Town of Danby, NY
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Loons

2009-11-04 Thread Bill Evans

50+ loons in southbound flight over the Danby State Forest from 6:30-7AM.

Bill E

- Original Message - 
From: Meena Haribal m...@cornell.edu

To: cayugabirds-l-cornell.edu cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
Sent: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 9:14 AM
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Loons


As I stepped out into back yard to catch bus, I just looked up and found 
loons overhead. There were nine of them fairly low in a tight knit group. 
So I watched them for a few seconds and almost missed the bus. Luckily 
driver saw me and stopped the bus :-)
Along East Ithaca Recreation Way, between Maple Hill and Game farm way 
there was my usual Mocking bird. Today he was on a slightly further away 
tree and called a couple of times as I passed. I replied back as usual. It 
seems to be kind of we say hello to each other almost everyday.  There 
were several Am robins in equestrian field on fruit trees.


Meena

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[cayugabirds-l] Morning flight 10/25

2009-10-25 Thread Bill Evans
Greetings birders,

I estimate 400-500 Am. Robins past by my observation site in southcentral Danby 
this morning between 7:30-8:30AM EDT. They were headed northwesterly at 
altitudes generally 200-ft above ground level (about 1700-ft asl). A higher 
vector (~600+-ft agl) of lesser numbers of southbound Robins was noted 
beginning about 7:50 AM  -- the two opposing flight directions happening 
simultaneously.

Peak Robin morning flight numbers in past years from my observation site are 
4000-5000/hour, ten times what I counted today. Last week I had another morning 
count in the 400-500 range and these are the two largest flights I've noted 
this fall. Peak fall migration morning flights of Am. Robins typically occur 
through Ithaca in the next two weeks and can be observed from anywere with a 
view of the sky between half hour before sunrise to an hour after sunrise, 
sometimes later. The regional numbers are highly variable from year to year, 
apparently due to broad-scale weather patterns, perhaps in conjunction with 
circumnavigation dynamics around Lake Ontario..

Bill E

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Caspian Tern flight/migration

2009-08-24 Thread Bill Evans
Caspian Terns often roost with Ring-billed Gulls during the day on the roofs of 
the big box stores on the west side of the rte. 13 strip through downtown 
Ithaca. I haven't verified that they do so at night but it seems like a 
possibility, especially when Cayuga Lake is high and the red-lighthouse jetty 
under water. If so, some of the southbound flight at dusk from Cayuga Lake 
could simply be going to roost.

Bill E


  At 12:31 PM 8/24/2009, Dave Nutter wrote:

Yesterday evening (Sun 23 Aug) I took a walk in Cass Park vainly hoping to 
see a Common Nighthawk.   However I did see a tight group of 6 CASPIAN TERNS 
flying determinedly south over the Flood Control Channel around 8:10pm and 
emitting raspy adult calls and squeaky juvenile calls.  I interpret this as 
migration.  


  I also saw 8 Caspian Terns over Home Depot area that seemed to be heading 
straight south. may be some of them were heading out of this place.

  Meena






On Monday, August 24, 2009, at 09:02AM, Paul Hurtado 
pau...@cam.cornell.edu wrote:
Hi folks,

Last night I heard a few migrants flying over my apartment in Ithaca above 
the commons off Buffalo) including Bobolink, RB Grosbeak, and two others 
that went unidentified (one kind of thrush/grosbeak like).

This morning I've got a resting Great-crested Flycatcher in the trees 
outside my apartment window (first one I've heard all summer here) and 
just heard an adult and juv Caspian Tern vocalizing somewhere overhead.

Time to start searching for those early migrants I suppose ;)

Good birding,
-Paul


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  Meena Haribal
  Cornell Lab Of Ornithology
  159, Sapsucker Woods Road
  Ithaca NY 14850
  Phone: 607-254-2148, 607-254-4958
  Fax: 607-254-2415, 607-254-2104
  webpage: 




http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/

http://www.geocities.com/asiootusloe/mothsofithaca.htmlhttp://haribal.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/wildwest+trip+August+2007+.pdf
 
  Current Loc: 42o 25' 44.48 N, 76o 28' 16.90 W Elev 816 ft or 248.7 m
  Formerly: 19o 0' 41,65 N, 72o 51' 13.02 E Elev 33 ft or 10m

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