Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Kaleb C. Striplin
Some truckers already make that kind of money, my dads neighbor makes 
more than that.  They already have sat tracking and can monitor speeds 
etc, luther can probably tell you about that.  What is lower speeds 
going to do?  Its a proven fact that lower speeds cause MORE wrecks 
because people get too bored and relaxed and such slow speeds.  Some 
areas raised their speeds to something like 80 (out in tx somewhere I 
think) and it LOWERED accidents quite a bit.  And as for people can wait 
longer for the load to get there,  BT, WRONG.  The way it is now the 
semi truck IS the warehouse, warehouses on wheels.  Everything is so 
dependant on when stuff arrives we as a country would be screwed if 
something happened to stop ontime delivery.  Its not like the old days 
where you had many a months, or weeks supplies of stuff at any 
particular location, everying is received just in time.  In other 
words, just as a business, store, or whatever is running out of 
something is when the truck arrives.


Tom Scordato wrote:


John Berryman said

I guess you wouldn't mind paying a lot more for every thing you buy
when trucks start costing more than a half million bucks. Note what
fuel surcharges alone can do to the price of shipping.
Maybe you should become a truck driver, it seems you might be more
attentive than some already on the job. That's where the problem really
exists, the human factor. Knowledge, skill, attitude, alertness and
emotions all factor in and vary widely between individuals.

John to answer your question no I would not mind paying more.  We are the 
most spoiled society on earth when it comes to that.
And Trucks do not need to cost a million bucks here are a few more thoughts 
that might work, heck maybe they are being tried allready.


A) pay truckers a decent salary  (may I suggest 75,000 to 100K ? a year plus 
benefits factor in inflation) to be away from their families, not piece meal 
$ for mile that is only asking for trouble.  This would include salary 
minimums for independents as well as company truckers
B) limit, monitors and track speeds with engine electronic and confirm of 
trucks via satellite or some other method.
C) brain and education, psycho test, similar to getting a merchant marine 
cost guard license, nuclear operators license or other licensed  positions 
renewable every five years.  These are to be real strict.  Try to weed out 
the chaff.
D) people and the industry can wait the extra three to five days (?)  the 
lower speed limits would entail, no one is going to melt because of it.  We 
survived when it took trains three weeks to deliver something.  Matter of 
fact we actually manufactured things back then stuff the whole world 
including us purchased.
E) weigh stations especially in the northeast (which are rarely open) would 
be required to be open allot more often (50%) of the time. Spot truck safety 
checks.
F) satellite tracking of speed and movement to determine and limit speed and 
number of hours truck operators are on the road

G) mandatory drug testing for uppers and downers
H) major bonuses for operators with a clean record who do not drive 
aggressively, reward safety.  Severely penalize truckers for accidents when 
they are at fault.  Like loose your commercial license, never drive 
commercially again just like if you screw up on a merchant ship, they rip 
your coast guard license up.
I) as an industry have a campain to educate the four wheelers to share in 
safety.


Make it a profession again instead of what one person told me it was prison 
for me or trucking.  Please do not compare trucks with cars by saying they 
should entail the same standards.  99% of the folks driving cars are not 
professionals.  Tuckers are supposed to be professionals, not cowboys. 
There is too much at stake.


Regards Tom Scordato
Bellefonte PA































- Original Message - 
From: John Berryman [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: Mercedes Discussion List [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 11:32 AM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues




On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 06:34 AM, Tom Scordato wrote:



An
industry which should have the same safety standards as lets say the
aerospace industry or maritime industry, is certainly lacking, big
time, yet
on a day by day basis affects as many if not more people.


I guess you wouldn't mind paying a lot more for every thing you buy
when trucks start costing more than a half million bucks. Note what
fuel surcharges alone can do to the price of shipping.
Maybe you should become a truck driver, it seems you might be more
attentive than some already on the job. That's where the problem really
exists, the human factor. Knowledge, skill, attitude, alertness and
emotions all factor in and vary widely between individuals.


Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am
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Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Kevin
On Wed, Feb 01, 2006 at 07:04:35PM -0600, Kaleb C. Striplin wrote:
 Yep, I had to take a pee test before I could even APPLY for my CDL.  And 
 yes, standards are WAY more strict.  For example, its illegal to carry a 
 firearm in a commercial vehicle with a CDL, even if you hold a conceal 
 and carry permit.  You can lose your license and go to jail immediatly.

ODD, as that is not the case in california (of all places). Actually, you
don't need a CCW to carry in an owner-operator rig in CA (and there's case
law on that one).

K



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Kaleb C. Striplin

uhhh, California doesnt have much say so about it, its a national thing.

Kevin wrote:


On Wed, Feb 01, 2006 at 07:04:35PM -0600, Kaleb C. Striplin wrote:

Yep, I had to take a pee test before I could even APPLY for my CDL.  And 
yes, standards are WAY more strict.  For example, its illegal to carry a 
firearm in a commercial vehicle with a CDL, even if you hold a conceal 
and carry permit.  You can lose your license and go to jail immediatly.



ODD, as that is not the case in california (of all places). Actually, you
don't need a CCW to carry in an owner-operator rig in CA (and there's case
law on that one).

K

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 89 560SEL, 87 300SDL, 85 380SE, 85 300D,
 84 250 LWB, 83 300TD, 81 300TD, 81 240D, 81 240D,
 76 450SEL, 76 240D, 76 300D, 74 240D, 69 250
http://www.striplin.net



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread lee
On Wednesday 01 February 2006 5:51, Kaleb C. Striplin wrote:
 so lets here some of those idiot 4 wheeler driver stories.  I always
 love those.


I think anyone living in the Sonoran desert basin of Arizona has a few- we see 
'em in the news constantly. 

When it rains hard in the desert around Phoenix and Tucson during the 
monsoons, there are any number of washes which cross major roads and which 
become impassable, raging torrents of water as much as five or six feet deep. 
Invariably, some weenie thinks I can cross that, I've got a FOUR WHEEL 
DRIVE!

Generally, you get to see the weenie on the six o'clock news, standing on the 
roof of his submerged SUV, waving arms frantically at the rescue helicopter 
overhead. 

Apparently, some folks don't realize that a four wheel drive is not a 
submarine. Maybe they forgot that the cute propeller thingie on their trailer 
hitch is just for looks...

The best is when they show a picture of the vehicle and it is clearly just a 
few yards up or downstream from another four-wheel-drive which got stuck 
trying the same thing. 

Lee



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread David Brodbeck

Kaleb C. Striplin wrote:
Some truckers already make that kind of money, my dads neighbor makes 
more than that.  They already have sat tracking and can monitor speeds 
etc, luther can probably tell you about that.  What is lower speeds 
going to do?  Its a proven fact that lower speeds cause MORE wrecks 
because people get too bored and relaxed and such slow speeds.


The problem is the sheer physics involved.  A truck going 80 mph has a 
tremendous stopping distance, even compared to a car at the same speed.  
There's the sheer weight involved, and the fact that semi braking 
systems aren't exactly state of the art -- compared to a car, they're 
pretty underbraked.  (The coal trucking industry fought an anti-lock 
braking system mandate by pointing out that a loaded coal truck can't 
generate enough braking effort to lock its wheels!  I also remember 
hearing about an accident where a truck took out a car that was stopped 
at the bottom of a hill waiting to turn left.  The trucker was not 
issued a ticket because the police determined that, travelling at the 
speed limit, there was no way he could have seen the car in time to stop 
before hitting it -- once he crested the hill the car was already closer 
than his minimum stopping distance.)




Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread David Brodbeck

R A Bennell wrote:

Recent article in our local paper says that the average age of truckers
these days is climbing. Young people are not interested in the job and there
is a shortage of drivers. Expect things to get worse before they get better.
  


Does a CDL require an annual physical exam, like a pilot's license?  It 
seems like it should for truckers carrying hazardous loads, at very 
least.  There was recently an incident where I-5 was closed because a 
tank truck turned over after the driver had a heart attack.  Fortunately 
he was able to guide the truck onto the shoulder before dying, or he 
wouldn't have been the only casualty.




Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Kaleb C. Striplin
not sure about annual, but yes, you have to have to pass DOT physical to 
get CDL


David Brodbeck wrote:


R A Bennell wrote:


Recent article in our local paper says that the average age of truckers
these days is climbing. Young people are not interested in the job and there
is a shortage of drivers. Expect things to get worse before they get better.
 



Does a CDL require an annual physical exam, like a pilot's license?  It 
seems like it should for truckers carrying hazardous loads, at very 
least.  There was recently an incident where I-5 was closed because a 
tank truck turned over after the driver had a heart attack.  Fortunately 
he was able to guide the truck onto the shoulder before dying, or he 
wouldn't have been the only casualty.


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 89 560SEL, 87 300SDL, 85 380SE, 85 300D,
 84 250 LWB, 83 300TD, 81 300TD, 81 240D, 81 240D,
 76 450SEL, 76 240D, 76 300D, 74 240D, 69 250
http://www.striplin.net



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Mitch Haley
lee wrote:
 
 Apparently, some folks don't realize that a four wheel drive is not a
 submarine.

You haven't seen the commercials for Jeep SUVs in recent years, have you?
You can park those things completely under water, start them up and drive
right out of the ocean. They don't even get wet inside.



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread David Brodbeck

Mitch Haley wrote:

I first read that in a motorcycle magazine when I was a teenager. Having
a preplanned strategy for if this bozo tries to kill me does work. When
the other driver does try to kill me, my contingency plan is implemented
faster than I can think.
  


There's a related saying, in aviation, that you should never let an 
airplane take you somewhere that your mind didn't get to five minutes 
ago.  In driving our time horizons are measured in seconds instead of 
minutes, but we still need to plan ahead.


For example, most people fail to consider their sight distance when 
setting their speed.  What if that blind curve or that rise in the road 
hides a downed tree, a washout, or a stalled car?  I learned this lesson 
as a young driver when I blasted around a curve at 60 mph and found a 
tractor on the other side doing 15 mph in my lane.  Scared the crap out 
of me.  Now I don't do that anymore.





Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread David Brodbeck

Kaleb C. Striplin wrote:
not sure about annual, but yes, you have to have to pass DOT physical to 
get CDL
  


Thanks.  That's reassuring.




Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Tom Scordato
thanks John.  I seems the things I suggested are in for the most part in 
affect.  Then why aremany of them still maniacs?  Are they just trying to 
get home earlier?  One maniac with 100,000 lbs is too many.  Regards Tom
- Original Message - 
From: John Berryman [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: Mercedes Discussion List [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 2:57 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues




On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 01:37 PM, Tom Scordato wrote:


John to answer your question no I would not mind paying more.


I know I would. You would too , you're just caught up in the moment.





  We are the
most spoiled society on earth when it comes to that.


We're spoiled in almost every aspect. (except automotive lighting)


And Trucks do not need to cost a million bucks here are a few more
thoughts
that might work, heck maybe they are being tried allready.

A) pay truckers a decent salary  (may I suggest 75,000 to 100K ? a
year plus
benefits factor in inflation) to be away from their families, not
piece meal
$ for mile that is only asking for trouble.  This would include salary
minimums for independents as well as company truckers


Some do make money like that and that's the life of a trucker.


B) limit, monitors and track speeds with engine electronic and confirm
of
trucks via satellite or some other method.


All this has been done for years and it is increasing.


C) brain and education, psycho test, similar to getting a merchant
marine
cost guard license, nuclear operators license or other licensed
positions
renewable every five years.  These are to be real strict.  Try to weed
out
the chaff.


Getting a CDL requires training and testing. Commercial drivers are
faced with stiffer penalties and can loose there license for way fewer
infractions than a common operator.


D) people and the industry can wait the extra three to five days (?)
the
lower speed limits would entail, no one is going to melt because of
it.  We
survived when it took trains three weeks to deliver something.  Matter
of
fact we actually manufactured things back then stuff the whole world
including us purchased.


The rest of the world has been accustomed to speedy service and its
the customer that inevitably sets the standard. i doubt the general
public wants to wait any longer. For some next-day is too slow.


E) weigh stations especially in the northeast (which are rarely open)
would
be required to be open allot more often (50%) of the time. Spot truck
safety
checks.


The fact that they exist and could be open dictates that they drive
safe trucks and haul safe loads. If you drove professionally, you'd
think that there are too many open too much.
In a lot of locales, they employ a system that takes info
electronically and truck just have to pass under the sensors. This can
only be used by those that meet all the requirements. Other trucks must
pull into the weigh stations.


F) satellite tracking of speed and movement to determine and limit
speed and
number of hours truck operators are on the road


In effect for a long time.


G) mandatory drug testing for uppers and downers


Same as above. Long time.


H) major bonuses for operators with a clean record who do not drive
aggressively, reward safety.  Severely penalize truckers for accidents
when
they are at fault.  Like loose your commercial license, never drive
commercially again just like if you screw up on a merchant ship, they
rip
your coast guard license up.


This is done. Insurance Cos give Safe Driver discounts and penalties
otherwise to private individuals as well as commercial drivers and
trucking companies. A CDL is a Federal License issued by the various
states, believe me, they're plenty strict as they are.


I) as an industry have a campain to educate the four wheelers to
share in
safety.


Amen, but this should be done before a license is issued after a
certain amount of infractions/accidents and periodically throughout the
life of drivers. Re-Testing should be mandatory as well. Some states
are re-testing seniors. This is a good thing. If you can't pass written
and driving tests you pose a threat to fellow drivers, pedestrians and
property and should not be allowed the privelage of a driver's license.



Make it a profession again instead of what one person told me it was
prison
for me or trucking.  Please do not compare trucks with cars by saying
they
should entail the same standards.  99% of the folks driving cars are
not
professionals.  Tuckers are supposed to be professionals, not cowboys.
There is too much at stake.


How many more rights do you want us to give up? The bad drivers
obsolete themselves over time, many lose their license and drive any
way but its near impossible to drive a truck unlicensed, thanks to the
regs you hopefully now realize are in effect.



Regards Tom Scordato
Bellefonte PA


Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am
___
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For new parts

Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread John Berryman


On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 02:14 PM, Gary Hurst wrote:


I am more than a little dismayed at the demise of the quality of the
professional truck driver.  not long ago, the big rig driver would 
often be
an exemplar for safe and courteous driving.  today, trucks scare me 
more

than drunks.



	A direct result of drug testing. Its affected many other industries 
too.



Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am


Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Luther Gulseth

Well said Kaleb.

The trucks I maintain haul parts for Nissan, Toyota, Honda, Chrysler, US  
Mail, and other high priority (JIT) freight.  Many times our trailer is  
live loaded/unloaded (mostly Toyota) onto the assembly line and other  
times it sits less than 4 hours before parts are used on the assembly  
line.  Life's extremely exciting when one of these trucks breaks down.   
I'm the only maintenance person who can get tires changed NASCAR style  
and other trucks pulled out of the shop by a forklift to repair mine.   
Damnit, I love the power that gives me. :D


There are also 15-20 drivers I manage who easily make 100-130k a year and  
are home 2 nights/days a week.  They make 3-4 times my salary and I tell  
them what to do.


On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 19:00:30 -0600, Kaleb C. Striplin [EMAIL PROTECTED]  
wrote:



Some truckers already make that kind of money, my dads neighbor makes
more than that.  They already have sat tracking and can monitor speeds
etc, luther can probably tell you about that.  What is lower speeds
going to do?  Its a proven fact that lower speeds cause MORE wrecks
because people get too bored and relaxed and such slow speeds.  Some
areas raised their speeds to something like 80 (out in tx somewhere I
think) and it LOWERED accidents quite a bit.  And as for people can wait
longer for the load to get there,  BT, WRONG.  The way it is now the
semi truck IS the warehouse, warehouses on wheels.  Everything is so
dependant on when stuff arrives we as a country would be screwed if
something happened to stop ontime delivery.  Its not like the old days
where you had many a months, or weeks supplies of stuff at any
particular location, everying is received just in time.  In other
words, just as a business, store, or whatever is running out of
something is when the truck arrives.





--
Luther   KB5QHU
Alma, Ark
'83 300SD (231,xxx kmi)
'82 300CD (158,xxx kmi)
'90 300E  '82 300D (parts or run?)



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Luther Gulseth
Oh yea, I was going to mention the technology is out there to control the  
trucks ECM through the satellite.  Commands can be sent (like shut down at  
next stop), read engine codes, and many other goodies.


On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 21:20:28 -0600, Luther Gulseth [EMAIL PROTECTED]  
wrote:



Well said Kaleb.

The trucks I maintain haul parts for Nissan, Toyota, Honda, Chrysler, US
Mail, and other high priority (JIT) freight.  Many times our trailer is
live loaded/unloaded (mostly Toyota) onto the assembly line and other
times it sits less than 4 hours before parts are used on the assembly
line.  Life's extremely exciting when one of these trucks breaks down.
I'm the only maintenance person who can get tires changed NASCAR style
and other trucks pulled out of the shop by a forklift to repair mine.
Damnit, I love the power that gives me. :D

There are also 15-20 drivers I manage who easily make 100-130k a year and
are home 2 nights/days a week.  They make 3-4 times my salary and I tell
them what to do.





--
Luther   KB5QHU
Alma, Ark
'83 300SD (231,xxx kmi)
'82 300CD (158,xxx kmi)
'90 300E  '82 300D (parts or run?)



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread OK Don
Huh? - Please explain. I don't see the relationship ---


 A direct result of drug testing. Its affected many other industries
 too.


 Johnny B.

--
OK Don, KD5NRO
Norman, OK
'90 300D 243K, Rattled
'87 300SDL 290K, Limo Lite, or blue car
'81 240D 173K, Gramps, or yellow car
'78 450SLC 67K, brown car
'97 Ply Grand Voyager 78K Van Go



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread John Berryman


On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 11:04 PM, OK Don wrote:

A direct result of drug testing. Its affected many other 
industries

too.


Johnny B.



	There are a plethora of great workers from all walks of life that use 
drugs recreationally ie: not high on the job. A study shows that they 
either fear the results of a failed test or consider it an invasion of 
privacy and they won't even apply for the job.
	This same study also showed using insurance Co statistics that since 
widespread drug testing has been implemented the workplace has become 
no safer, in fact, perhaps by coincidence job related loss claims have 
increased. It was also speculated that all the lawyers running around 
screaming sue everybody have fueled the increased reports of job 
related accidents.



Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am


Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread Kaleb C. Striplin

yep

John Berryman wrote:


On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 11:04 PM, OK Don wrote:


   A direct result of drug testing. Its affected many other 
industries

too.


Johnny B.




	There are a plethora of great workers from all walks of life that use 
drugs recreationally ie: not high on the job. A study shows that they 
either fear the results of a failed test or consider it an invasion of 
privacy and they won't even apply for the job.
	This same study also showed using insurance Co statistics that since 
widespread drug testing has been implemented the workplace has become 
no safer, in fact, perhaps by coincidence job related loss claims have 
increased. It was also speculated that all the lawyers running around 
screaming sue everybody have fueled the increased reports of job 
related accidents.



Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am
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--
Kaleb C. Striplin/Claremore, OK
 89 560SEL, 87 300SDL, 85 380SE, 85 300D,
 84 250 LWB, 83 300TD, 81 300TD, 81 240D, 81 240D,
 76 450SEL, 76 240D, 76 300D, 74 240D, 69 250
http://www.striplin.net



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread R A Bennell
Two Words - Diesel and Snorkel

Randy B

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] Behalf Of lee
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 5:43 PM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Subject: Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues


On Wednesday 01 February 2006 5:51, Kaleb C. Striplin wrote:
 so lets here some of those idiot 4 wheeler driver stories.  I always
 love those.


I think anyone living in the Sonoran desert basin of Arizona has a few- we
see
'em in the news constantly.

When it rains hard in the desert around Phoenix and Tucson during the
monsoons, there are any number of washes which cross major roads and which
become impassable, raging torrents of water as much as five or six feet
deep.
Invariably, some weenie thinks I can cross that, I've got a FOUR WHEEL
DRIVE!

Generally, you get to see the weenie on the six o'clock news, standing on
the
roof of his submerged SUV, waving arms frantically at the rescue helicopter
overhead.

Apparently, some folks don't realize that a four wheel drive is not a
submarine. Maybe they forgot that the cute propeller thingie on their
trailer
hitch is just for looks...

The best is when they show a picture of the vehicle and it is clearly just a
few yards up or downstream from another four-wheel-drive which got stuck
trying the same thing.

Lee

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Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-02 Thread R A Bennell
Yeah, I hear you. We had a major washout on the highway to our cottage a
couple of years back and I am sure it never got more than a couple of feet
deep. A beaver dam let go and logs and such washed down a hill and accross
the highway into the lake. It wouldn't have lasted long but it was a good
thing there was no one in that spot at the time. It took out the pavement
and left quite a hole.

Randy B

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] Behalf Of David Brodbeck
Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 9:34 AM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Subject: Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues


R A Bennell wrote:
 Two Words - Diesel and Snorkel


If you try to cross five feet of running water I guarantee you'll be on
the evening news, snorkel or no.  If the water's moving fast it only
takes a couple of feet to sweep a truck downstream.  Water is dense stuff.

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Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread John Berryman


On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 06:34 AM, Tom Scordato wrote:


An
industry which should have the same safety standards as lets say the
aerospace industry or maritime industry, is certainly lacking, big 
time, yet

on a day by day basis affects as many if not more people.


	I guess you wouldn't mind paying a lot more for every thing you buy 
when trucks start costing more than a half million bucks. Note what 
fuel surcharges alone can do to the price of shipping.
	Maybe you should become a truck driver, it seems you might be more 
attentive than some already on the job. That's where the problem really 
exists, the human factor. Knowledge, skill, attitude, alertness and 
emotions all factor in and vary widely between individuals.



Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am


Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread R A Bennell
Recent article in our local paper says that the average age of truckers
these days is climbing. Young people are not interested in the job and there
is a shortage of drivers. Expect things to get worse before they get better.

Randy B

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] Behalf Of Tom Scordato
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 3:34 AM
To: Mercedes Discussion List
Subject: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues


Traveling on I-83 on my way to DC on business from Bellefonte PA.  Place in
Harrisburg where you have to off ramp on I -83 to get back on I-83.  Ramp
and up take to ramp are on a curve.  Well Traffic was stopped on the ramp.
I saw this in time and slowed down and left my usual three car lengths.  As
I slowed to a stop I looked in my rearview.  Here comes a full size semi
doing what I estimate is at least 50-55 mph or better coming right at me and
closing very, very fast.  So fast that I figured not only would I be dead
(pulverized from the rear) but my car would be pool balled into the car
stopped ahead of me.  No steel beauty 123 chassis was going to save me from
this. No way instant death.  At the last nano second, I had about 6 feet of
break down lane on my right and that three-car length space ahead of me I
gunned it and moved into the break down lane.  He or she by some act of God
made a swerve steering maneuver to his left, which made his load do a little
dance, but missed me by 2 to 6 inches.  He keeps going in the left lane,
which took you to some state road.  Like I said I would have been pulverized
or vaporized instantaneously.  Few cars ahead would / could have been wasted
too.



If it was a car that hit me it might have been survivable. The guy is
driving a 100,000 lb (?) rig and flat out was not paying attention. That is
the difference (the shear physics), which can never be overlooked.  An
industry which should have the same safety standards as lets say the
aerospace industry or maritime industry, is certainly lacking, big time, yet
on a day by day basis affects as many if not more people.  It is truly out
of control.  In my million plus miles of traveling this was the closest I
have come to getting wasted.  Thanks Guardian Angel my dear!




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Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Robert M Doran
I just had to say something here because, besides presently owning and
driving a 115 and a 107 (...and the old 123--gone but not forgotten), I
drive an 18-wheeler for a living most of the time and have done so for
over 30 years. 

Foremost in my mind when I am approaching any situation on the road is
the anticipation of what would be the most inappropriate (read: stupid)
thing that another driver could do and then plan what my reaction would
be to it. I doubt if any of you guys on the list would believe me if I
told you how often that's exactly what does happen. I'm not trying to say
that truck drivers are blameless--in fact I've seen some real boneheads
that should have not been allowed behind the wheel of any vehicle, let
alone a truck--but some of the things I've seen 4-wheeler drivers do
would simply blow you away! And I have to concede that it is probable
that the sheer numbers of 4-wheelers in comparison to the numbers of
trucks on the road blow what I've observed out of proportion somewhat.
But still...

In my years of operating these monsters my experiences have taught me to
be a defensive driver above all else and, even though I am confident
enough of my own driving abilities, I know that the beast I am herding
down the road is much more difficult to maneuver than is my 115, for
example, so I drive with that thought in mind and try to compensate in
advance for upcoming traffic situations. Unfortunately, many (most?)
4-wheeler drivers do not exhibit that concept and they drive as if these
trucks were as manageable as what they are driving and that's not the way
it is at all.  It appears from Tom Scordato's post that he was well aware
of a possible upcoming hazarous event and he acted appropriately. That
action may well have saved his life. If more people would similarly try
to be more aware and prepared, many injuries and lives lost might be
prevented. I don't know what the truck driver in question was doing when
he should have been paying attention, but he obviously was driving beyond
his capacity to control his vehicle. There could have been extenuating
circumstances, but he was obviously not in control and that's a bad
thing.
 
Just as in any group of people, there are those over-the-road drivers who
do their jobs efficiently and exhibit a high level of expertise--and
there are those at the other end of the scale as well. Unfortunately,
it's the ones at the lower end of the scale that often get the attention
and therefore cause some folks to generalize and form opinions based on
their (re: all Indians walk single file--at least the one that I saw
did) personal experiences which are often very limited in scope. It's
too bad but that's how it is.

Since I'm not aware of the safety standards of the aerospace or maritime
industries, I'm unable to make any informed comments, but I do know that
both the federal government as well as the individual states have the
Department of Transportation regulations which do much to enforce
compliance with safety standards.  The demise of the old Interstate
Commerce Commission left a little to be desired in as far as enforcement
of a multitude of confusing rules, but it was a step in the right
direction and all good things seem to take some time before they mature
to their fruition (is that even a word?). Unfortunately, it's not there
yet, but I have observed much progress (notice I didn't say
improvement-some of the new rules are absolutely assinine!) in this area
over the past 30 years. But they are working on it.

Anyway, I got that off my chest. I'm glad nobody was injured or
killed--that's the main thing--and one more of these amazing MBz's (with
a driver a cut above the average driver) continues to roll on it's way
and that's a good thing.
From [EMAIL PROTECTED] Wed Feb 01 18:02:04 2006
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Reply-To: Mercedes Discussion 

Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Luther Gulseth
I also am in the trucking industry, managing the maintenance and repair of over 
220 semi's, all from my computer and phone.  When I'm in my 4 wheeler(I also 
posess a CDL), I constantly see reasons why we should have regulations similar 
to those in the commercial traffic realm.  Many drivers/cars should be put out 
of service until the proper level of safety is attained.  All states should 
have mandatory yearly checks for POI(inusrance) and the safety condition of the 
automobile.  
I dislike gov't over-regulation, but this is an area that is severely 
under-regulated.

Luther

~
~I just had to say something here because, besides presently owning and
~driving a 115 and a 107 (...and the old 123--gone but not forgotten), I
~drive an 18-wheeler for a living most of the time and have done so for
~over 30 years. 
~



-- 
Luther   KB5QHU
Alma, Ark
'83 300SD (230,xxx kmi) 
'82 300CD (158,222 kmi)
'90 300E  '82 300D (parts or run?)



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Tom Scordato

John Berryman said

I guess you wouldn't mind paying a lot more for every thing you buy
when trucks start costing more than a half million bucks. Note what
fuel surcharges alone can do to the price of shipping.
Maybe you should become a truck driver, it seems you might be more
attentive than some already on the job. That's where the problem really
exists, the human factor. Knowledge, skill, attitude, alertness and
emotions all factor in and vary widely between individuals.

John to answer your question no I would not mind paying more.  We are the 
most spoiled society on earth when it comes to that.
And Trucks do not need to cost a million bucks here are a few more thoughts 
that might work, heck maybe they are being tried allready.


A) pay truckers a decent salary  (may I suggest 75,000 to 100K ? a year plus 
benefits factor in inflation) to be away from their families, not piece meal 
$ for mile that is only asking for trouble.  This would include salary 
minimums for independents as well as company truckers
B) limit, monitors and track speeds with engine electronic and confirm of 
trucks via satellite or some other method.
C) brain and education, psycho test, similar to getting a merchant marine 
cost guard license, nuclear operators license or other licensed  positions 
renewable every five years.  These are to be real strict.  Try to weed out 
the chaff.
D) people and the industry can wait the extra three to five days (?)  the 
lower speed limits would entail, no one is going to melt because of it.  We 
survived when it took trains three weeks to deliver something.  Matter of 
fact we actually manufactured things back then stuff the whole world 
including us purchased.
E) weigh stations especially in the northeast (which are rarely open) would 
be required to be open allot more often (50%) of the time. Spot truck safety 
checks.
F) satellite tracking of speed and movement to determine and limit speed and 
number of hours truck operators are on the road

G) mandatory drug testing for uppers and downers
H) major bonuses for operators with a clean record who do not drive 
aggressively, reward safety.  Severely penalize truckers for accidents when 
they are at fault.  Like loose your commercial license, never drive 
commercially again just like if you screw up on a merchant ship, they rip 
your coast guard license up.
I) as an industry have a campain to educate the four wheelers to share in 
safety.


Make it a profession again instead of what one person told me it was prison 
for me or trucking.  Please do not compare trucks with cars by saying they 
should entail the same standards.  99% of the folks driving cars are not 
professionals.  Tuckers are supposed to be professionals, not cowboys. 
There is too much at stake.


Regards Tom Scordato
Bellefonte PA































- Original Message - 
From: John Berryman [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: Mercedes Discussion List [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 11:32 AM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues




On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 06:34 AM, Tom Scordato wrote:


An
industry which should have the same safety standards as lets say the
aerospace industry or maritime industry, is certainly lacking, big
time, yet
on a day by day basis affects as many if not more people.


I guess you wouldn't mind paying a lot more for every thing you buy
when trucks start costing more than a half million bucks. Note what
fuel surcharges alone can do to the price of shipping.
Maybe you should become a truck driver, it seems you might be more
attentive than some already on the job. That's where the problem really
exists, the human factor. Knowledge, skill, attitude, alertness and
emotions all factor in and vary widely between individuals.


Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am
___
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Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Tom Scordato
Robert well written, thanks for your input, kind words and professionalism. 
I am sure the operator who almost hit me learned and important lesson 
yesterday too. / Tom Scordato
- Original Message - 
From: Robert M Doran [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 12:56 PM
Subject: Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues



I just had to say something here because, besides presently owning and
driving a 115 and a 107 (...and the old 123--gone but not forgotten), I
drive an 18-wheeler for a living most of the time and have done so for
over 30 years.

Foremost in my mind when I am approaching any situation on the road is
the anticipation of what would be the most inappropriate (read: stupid)
thing that another driver could do and then plan what my reaction would
be to it. I doubt if any of you guys on the list would believe me if I
told you how often that's exactly what does happen. I'm not trying to say
that truck drivers are blameless--in fact I've seen some real boneheads
that should have not been allowed behind the wheel of any vehicle, let
alone a truck--but some of the things I've seen 4-wheeler drivers do
would simply blow you away! And I have to concede that it is probable
that the sheer numbers of 4-wheelers in comparison to the numbers of
trucks on the road blow what I've observed out of proportion somewhat.
But still...

In my years of operating these monsters my experiences have taught me to
be a defensive driver above all else and, even though I am confident
enough of my own driving abilities, I know that the beast I am herding
down the road is much more difficult to maneuver than is my 115, for
example, so I drive with that thought in mind and try to compensate in
advance for upcoming traffic situations. Unfortunately, many (most?)
4-wheeler drivers do not exhibit that concept and they drive as if these
trucks were as manageable as what they are driving and that's not the way
it is at all.  It appears from Tom Scordato's post that he was well aware
of a possible upcoming hazarous event and he acted appropriately. That
action may well have saved his life. If more people would similarly try
to be more aware and prepared, many injuries and lives lost might be
prevented. I don't know what the truck driver in question was doing when
he should have been paying attention, but he obviously was driving beyond
his capacity to control his vehicle. There could have been extenuating
circumstances, but he was obviously not in control and that's a bad
thing.

Just as in any group of people, there are those over-the-road drivers who
do their jobs efficiently and exhibit a high level of expertise--and
there are those at the other end of the scale as well. Unfortunately,
it's the ones at the lower end of the scale that often get the attention
and therefore cause some folks to generalize and form opinions based on
their (re: all Indians walk single file--at least the one that I saw
did) personal experiences which are often very limited in scope. It's
too bad but that's how it is.

Since I'm not aware of the safety standards of the aerospace or maritime
industries, I'm unable to make any informed comments, but I do know that
both the federal government as well as the individual states have the
Department of Transportation regulations which do much to enforce
compliance with safety standards.  The demise of the old Interstate
Commerce Commission left a little to be desired in as far as enforcement
of a multitude of confusing rules, but it was a step in the right
direction and all good things seem to take some time before they mature
to their fruition (is that even a word?). Unfortunately, it's not there
yet, but I have observed much progress (notice I didn't say
improvement-some of the new rules are absolutely assinine!) in this area
over the past 30 years. But they are working on it.

Anyway, I got that off my chest. I'm glad nobody was injured or
killed--that's the main thing--and one more of these amazing MBz's (with
a driver a cut above the average driver) continues to roll on it's way
and that's a good thing.
___
http://www.striplin.net
For new parts see official list sponsor: http://www.buymbparts.com/
For used parts email [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://striplin.net/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_striplin.net







Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread LT Don
You mean like we do our folks in the military?  [Sorry, just could not
resist.]

On 2/1/06, Tom Scordato [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


 A) pay truckers a decent salary  (may I suggest 75,000 to 100K ? a year
 plus
 benefits factor in inflation) to be away from their families




--
1977 240D
1983 VW Quantum turbo diesel 5-speed
1972 Honda CB-500K motorcycle

http://www.airamericaradio.com/listen


Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Luther Gulseth
Our nation would be better off to double the salaries of our Teachers.  This 
would attract more teachers that can and leave the option open to fire those 
who cannot and not have to worry about no one wanting to fill the position.

~
~You mean like we do our folks in the military?  [Sorry, just could not
~resist.]
~
~On 2/1/06, Tom Scordato [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
~
~
~ A) pay truckers a decent salary  (may I suggest 75,000 to 100K ? a year
~ plus
~ benefits factor in inflation) to be away from their families
~
~
~
~



-- 
Luther   KB5QHU
Alma, Ark
'83 300SD (230,xxx kmi) 
'82 300CD (158,222 kmi)
'90 300E  '82 300D (parts or run?)



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Gary Hurst
I am more than a little dismayed at the demise of the quality of the
professional truck driver.  not long ago, the big rig driver would often be
an exemplar for safe and courteous driving.  today, trucks scare me more
than drunks.



On 2/1/06, Robert M Doran [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

 I just had to say something here because, besides presently owning and
 driving a 115 and a 107 (...and the old 123--gone but not forgotten), I
 drive an 18-wheeler for a living most of the time and have done so for
 over 30 years.

 Foremost in my mind when I am approaching any situation on the road is
 the anticipation of what would be the most inappropriate (read: stupid)
 thing that another driver could do and then plan what my reaction would
 be to it. I doubt if any of you guys on the list would believe me if I
 told you how often that's exactly what does happen. I'm not trying to say
 that truck drivers are blameless--in fact I've seen some real boneheads
 that should have not been allowed behind the wheel of any vehicle, let
 alone a truck--but some of the things I've seen 4-wheeler drivers do
 would simply blow you away! And I have to concede that it is probable
 that the sheer numbers of 4-wheelers in comparison to the numbers of
 trucks on the road blow what I've observed out of proportion somewhat.
 But still...

 In my years of operating these monsters my experiences have taught me to
 be a defensive driver above all else and, even though I am confident
 enough of my own driving abilities, I know that the beast I am herding
 down the road is much more difficult to maneuver than is my 115, for
 example, so I drive with that thought in mind and try to compensate in
 advance for upcoming traffic situations. Unfortunately, many (most?)
 4-wheeler drivers do not exhibit that concept and they drive as if these
 trucks were as manageable as what they are driving and that's not the way
 it is at all.  It appears from Tom Scordato's post that he was well aware
 of a possible upcoming hazarous event and he acted appropriately. That
 action may well have saved his life. If more people would similarly try
 to be more aware and prepared, many injuries and lives lost might be
 prevented. I don't know what the truck driver in question was doing when
 he should have been paying attention, but he obviously was driving beyond
 his capacity to control his vehicle. There could have been extenuating
 circumstances, but he was obviously not in control and that's a bad
 thing.

 Just as in any group of people, there are those over-the-road drivers who
 do their jobs efficiently and exhibit a high level of expertise--and
 there are those at the other end of the scale as well. Unfortunately,
 it's the ones at the lower end of the scale that often get the attention
 and therefore cause some folks to generalize and form opinions based on
 their (re: all Indians walk single file--at least the one that I saw
 did) personal experiences which are often very limited in scope. It's
 too bad but that's how it is.

 Since I'm not aware of the safety standards of the aerospace or maritime
 industries, I'm unable to make any informed comments, but I do know that
 both the federal government as well as the individual states have the
 Department of Transportation regulations which do much to enforce
 compliance with safety standards.  The demise of the old Interstate
 Commerce Commission left a little to be desired in as far as enforcement
 of a multitude of confusing rules, but it was a step in the right
 direction and all good things seem to take some time before they mature
 to their fruition (is that even a word?). Unfortunately, it's not there
 yet, but I have observed much progress (notice I didn't say
 improvement-some of the new rules are absolutely assinine!) in this area
 over the past 30 years. But they are working on it.

 Anyway, I got that off my chest. I'm glad nobody was injured or
 killed--that's the main thing--and one more of these amazing MBz's (with
 a driver a cut above the average driver) continues to roll on it's way
 and that's a good thing.
 ___
 http://www.striplin.net
 For new parts see official list sponsor: http://www.buymbparts.com/
 For used parts email [EMAIL PROTECTED]

 To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
 http://striplin.net/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_striplin.net



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread R A Bennell
I would agree with that to a great extent. It disturbs me to see vehicles on
the road that have had a ball joint let go. I know folks who will put
nothing into a vehicle until it actually breaks. However, I can also recall
when we used to have inspections here, that I failed once because my ebrake
was not quite tight enough and had to come back another day and prove that
it had been repaired. Seemed to be overkill to me at the time but I guess
they had standards that they had to enforce. We do not appear to have the
random inspections anymore. - Too bad.

I also suspect that the majority of the bone headed traffic manovers that we
see are not deliberate in the sense that these folks know they are doing
something illegal and dangerous, but just ignorance of the driving
regulations. I am amazed (but I should not be) when someone cuts me off when
I have ther right of way and then gives me a one finger salute. They just do
not know any better.

Randy B

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] Behalf Of Luther Gulseth
Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 10:22 AM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues


I also am in the trucking industry, managing the maintenance and repair of
over 220 semi's, all from my computer and phone.  When I'm in my 4 wheeler(I
also posess a CDL), I constantly see reasons why we should have regulations
similar to those in the commercial traffic realm.  Many drivers/cars should
be put out of service until the proper level of safety is attained.  All
states should have mandatory yearly checks for POI(inusrance) and the safety
condition of the automobile.
I dislike gov't over-regulation, but this is an area that is severely
under-regulated.

Luther

~
~I just had to say something here because, besides presently owning and
~driving a 115 and a 107 (...and the old 123--gone but not forgotten), I
~drive an 18-wheeler for a living most of the time and have done so for
~over 30 years.
~



--
Luther   KB5QHU
Alma, Ark
'83 300SD (230,xxx kmi)
'82 300CD (158,222 kmi)
'90 300E  '82 300D (parts or run?)

___
http://www.striplin.net
For new parts see official list sponsor: http://www.buymbparts.com/
For used parts email [EMAIL PROTECTED]

To Unsubscribe or change delivery options go to:
http://striplin.net/mailman/listinfo/mercedes_striplin.net




Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread John Berryman


On Wednesday, February 1, 2006, at 01:37 PM, Tom Scordato wrote:


John to answer your question no I would not mind paying more.


I know I would. You would too , you're just caught up in the moment.





  We are the
most spoiled society on earth when it comes to that.


We're spoiled in almost every aspect. (except automotive lighting)

And Trucks do not need to cost a million bucks here are a few more 
thoughts

that might work, heck maybe they are being tried allready.

A) pay truckers a decent salary  (may I suggest 75,000 to 100K ? a 
year plus
benefits factor in inflation) to be away from their families, not 
piece meal

$ for mile that is only asking for trouble.  This would include salary
minimums for independents as well as company truckers


Some do make money like that and that's the life of a trucker.

B) limit, monitors and track speeds with engine electronic and confirm 
of

trucks via satellite or some other method.


All this has been done for years and it is increasing.

C) brain and education, psycho test, similar to getting a merchant 
marine
cost guard license, nuclear operators license or other licensed  
positions
renewable every five years.  These are to be real strict.  Try to weed 
out

the chaff.


	Getting a CDL requires training and testing. Commercial drivers are 
faced with stiffer penalties and can loose there license for way fewer 
infractions than a common operator.


D) people and the industry can wait the extra three to five days (?)  
the
lower speed limits would entail, no one is going to melt because of 
it.  We
survived when it took trains three weeks to deliver something.  Matter 
of

fact we actually manufactured things back then stuff the whole world
including us purchased.


	The rest of the world has been accustomed to speedy service and its 
the customer that inevitably sets the standard. i doubt the general 
public wants to wait any longer. For some next-day is too slow.


E) weigh stations especially in the northeast (which are rarely open) 
would
be required to be open allot more often (50%) of the time. Spot truck 
safety

checks.


	The fact that they exist and could be open dictates that they drive 
safe trucks and haul safe loads. If you drove professionally, you'd 
think that there are too many open too much.
	In a lot of locales, they employ a system that takes info 
electronically and truck just have to pass under the sensors. This can 
only be used by those that meet all the requirements. Other trucks must 
pull into the weigh stations.


F) satellite tracking of speed and movement to determine and limit 
speed and

number of hours truck operators are on the road


In effect for a long time.


G) mandatory drug testing for uppers and downers


Same as above. Long time.


H) major bonuses for operators with a clean record who do not drive
aggressively, reward safety.  Severely penalize truckers for accidents 
when

they are at fault.  Like loose your commercial license, never drive
commercially again just like if you screw up on a merchant ship, they 
rip

your coast guard license up.


	This is done. Insurance Cos give Safe Driver discounts and penalties 
otherwise to private individuals as well as commercial drivers and 
trucking companies. A CDL is a Federal License issued by the various 
states, believe me, they're plenty strict as they are.


I) as an industry have a campain to educate the four wheelers to 
share in

safety.


	Amen, but this should be done before a license is issued after a 
certain amount of infractions/accidents and periodically throughout the 
life of drivers. Re-Testing should be mandatory as well. Some states 
are re-testing seniors. This is a good thing. If you can't pass written 
and driving tests you pose a threat to fellow drivers, pedestrians and 
property and should not be allowed the privelage of a driver's license.




Make it a profession again instead of what one person told me it was 
prison
for me or trucking.  Please do not compare trucks with cars by saying 
they
should entail the same standards.  99% of the folks driving cars are 
not

professionals.  Tuckers are supposed to be professionals, not cowboys.
There is too much at stake.


	How many more rights do you want us to give up? The bad drivers 
obsolete themselves over time, many lose their license and drive any 
way but its near impossible to drive a truck unlicensed, thanks to the 
regs you hopefully now realize are in effect.




Regards Tom Scordato
Bellefonte PA


Johnny B.
I Mac Therefore I am


Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Luther Gulseth
Everyone is King of the Road.

~
~I am amazed (but I should not be) when someone cuts me off when
~I have ther right of way and then gives me a one finger salute. They just do
~not know any better.
~
~Randy B
~



-- 
Luther   KB5QHU
Alma, Ark
'83 300SD (230,xxx kmi) 
'82 300CD (158,222 kmi)
'90 300E  '82 300D (parts or run?)



Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Robert M Doran
At the risk of getting a full-blown discussion started which will
ultimately solve ALL the world's problems, I'll add a few more selected
comments:

Paying truckers a decent salary is fine, but most of the truckers I talk
with are not so dissatisfied with their salaries as much as they are
disillusioned with the treatment they receive--or don't receive, as the
case may be--from many of the people they associate with during the
course of doing their job--lessors, dispatchers, shippers, consignees,
warehouse personnel, overzealous scale personnel, etc., just to name a
few.  Shipping schedules oftentimes result in actually forcing drivers to
violate log book regulations and most truckers I know run at least two
logbooks because if they don't they won't be able to do the job that
their employer, shipper, dispatcher--or whatever--demands of them.  Have
you ever been ordered to intentionally drive your vehicle down the road
when you know you're so tired you can't think straight?...Or have you
ever been so distraught over having just been forced to unload your own
truck or wait another day to unload (therefore making you be late to your
next appointment) because you reported in to the unloading dock ten
minutes later than you were told to because some inspector had held you
up at the scale just to prove that he could, that you made a poor
decision or two?  
It's not all about salary--some decency and respect for another human
being's self-concept goes a long way too. 

Pay teachers more, too?I'll be one of the last to argue with that
because I was a teacher before I started a career as a truck driver, but
the reason I'm no longer  teaching has nothing to do with money--I wasn't
getting rich but I got by and the work was what I had always wanted to do
so it really wasn't work for me in a sense. But I developed a problem
dealing with kids whose parents were convinced that they could do no
wrong. When I was in school myself I could have been every teacher's
nightmare but I wasn't because I knew what my dad would do to me if he
found out about itnot a pretty sight!  That, sadly, is no longer
true. Somehow, a 'time-out' just doesn't seem to pack it. If you're
wondering why there's a teacher shortage I think there are more suitable
other things to attribute it to than just low salaries--ask any teacher.
The same holds true for the shortage of good, qualified truck drivers.
Enough said about that.

Limiting and monitoring speeds for trucks? Keep in mind that many of
today's trucks are finely engineered machines monitored by computers and
are fully capable of going with the flow of today's traffic, but have
been programmed to stay within the limitations imposed by regulatory
authorities. Of course there are ways to override those limitations and
'turn up' the horsepower and I guess that's fine until you get caught or
twist a driveshaft or get too many speeding tickets. Hopefully you don't
kill or maim somebody first.

The way we do it in Montana is to be avoided, in my opinion. We set a
daytime speed limit on secondary (two lane) highways of 60 mph for trucks
and 70 mph for all other vehicles (except for Canadian trucks--they can
go as fast as they want to at all times anywhere--NAFTA?). Now picture
yourself in a line of traffic 1/2 mile long behind a trucker trying to go
the speed limit of 60 because a speeding ticket may cost him his job, a
tremendous raise in insurance rates, his CDL...or any combination. Of
course you don't know that he is going as fast as he legally can, so you
take a chance and try to work your way to the front of the line--as does
everybody else--so you can pass the slower truck and be on your way. Do
you flip him the bird as you go around?  Of course you do!  Does it make
him happy? Of course it doesn't! Is he even more upset and frustrated now
than he was yesterday? Probably. Is he more likely now to be involved in
a mishap because his attention has been compromised? Hopefully not but
probably.
The legislature, in all it's wisdom, passed this law. I don't know if all
states deal with this, but this is what some results have been around
here.
 
Yes, it's not easy to get a CDL, especially class A type 1 w/hazardous
materials endorsement which is very often required, and it's much easier
to lose one. That's the way it should be but it needs to go further by
extending to all operators. The statistics for fatalities and injuries
involving trucks are misleading at best. To use an analogy, of the people
that have been attacked by lions in the past century, a large percentage
of that number have probably been injured severely or even killed. This
would lead you to feel--and rightfully so--that lions are to be feared
and avoided. On the other hand,  a much smaller percentage of the people
attacked by dogs over the same period of time have probably suffered much
less in all respects, and although there have probably been a far greater
number of these dog attacks than there have been lion attacks, 

Re: [MBZ] Trucking Industry the Saga continues

2006-02-01 Thread Mitch Haley
Robert M Doran wrote:
 Foremost in my mind when I am approaching any situation on the road is
 the anticipation of what would be the most inappropriate (read: stupid)
 thing that another driver could do and then plan what my reaction would
 be to it. 

I first read that in a motorcycle magazine when I was a teenager. Having
a preplanned strategy for if this bozo tries to kill me does work. When
the other driver does try to kill me, my contingency plan is implemented
faster than I can think.