When I act on U.S. soil, I'm under U.S. law and no other, regardless of where 
the document is stored or where the original author resides or did their work.

Secondly, under U.S. copyright law, criticism enjoys a very large exception.  
You can copy an entire work as long as you are criticizing it :)  check it out 
yourself.  You have to pay attention to the U.S. case law as we don't adhere to 
what England or Europe does in general on this point.

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Wols Lists <antli...@youngman.org.uk>
To: u2-users <u2-users@listserver.u2ug.org>
Sent: Sat, Dec 3, 2011 5:16 pm
Subject: Re: [U2] Unidata 7.1 Unresponsive UO Connection


On 03/12/11 05:45, Wjhonson wrote:
>
>   You don't need permission if you're being critical.
> So all you have to do is take a copy of it, and then as you're working 
> through 
it, criticize the lack of clarity and add the lacking clarity.
> Perfectly legal under copyright law :)
>
Good luck with avoiding a lawsuit if you try that...

Several points to bear in mind
1) per Berne, the mere act of creation puts a "literary" work under 
copyright.
2) "fair use" and similar are Americanisms - there's no such concept 
under UK law although other jurisdictions do have something similar.
3) What you're doing is creating a "derived work", for which permission 
IS required. I think you're confusing "criticism" and "critique" - the 
point of a critique is it doesn't contain much, if any, of the work it's 
critiquing.

Cheers,
Wol
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