Thanks for your replies to my post, Mike, Blossom and Ahmed. You all 
seem a bit unsure if your reply make sense, but to me they certainly 
do.

I hope Suzuki does NOT mean doing only one thing at a time, or like 
Mike wrote: "If we're washing dishes, for instance, we should be 
washing dishes --not washing dishes, trying to balance our 
checkbooks in our head, planning dinner, etc." That would perhaps be 
feasible for a monk in a monastery, but would be very hard in normal 
life. I imagine my neighbour, who is a mother of three children and 
has to do lots of things at the same time: dressing one child, 
watching after her other childs, in the meantime plan all activities 
in order to have them all at school the right time while they are 
already late. She cannot just focus fully on, for example, dressing 
one child. Or, concerning my more simple life, I sometimes have to 
prepare a meeting while driving my car, or type a mail while 
monitoring if a collegue I have to speak has already entered.

So I hope Ahmed is correct when he writes: "I think the passage you 
cited does not mean that one should do just one thing at a time 
because what about multi-tasking? Is multi-tasking not a part of 
one's Buddha nature?"

But if multi-tasking is 'allowed in Zen' (don't hit me for this 
phrase...), what does the text of Suzuki mean that I cited in my 
previous post? 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts or giving your explanation!





--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Ahmed <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> I have read that book as well. So beautifully simple it puts me 
into a
> trance when I read it.
> 
> I think the passage you cited does not mean that one should do 
just one
> thing at a time because what about multi-tasking? Is multi-tasking 
not a
> part of one's Buddha nature?
> 
> The book "The Way of Zen" by Alan Watts spells this all out very 
clearly
> especially where it goes into the details about worrying about 
worrying and
> how we can actually never do anything wrong in Zen because 
everything is
> natural. Even unnaturalness is natural. This is the reason why and 
how one
> can just relax and let everything go.
> 
> So what it means to me is be naturally in the moment without 
carrying the
> previous moment (but really you can't ever "carry" the previous 
moment--you
> only imagine it is so).
> 
> (I probably didn't make any sense but I think the meaning is 
clearer after
> reading Alan Watts book.)
> 
> 
> On 5/2/06, Eugene <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> >
> > I am reading the book Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, of Shunryu 
Suzuki -
> > an excellent book. It goes into depths while being 
understandable.
> >
> > However, there is a concept in it I don't understand. I would 
like to
> > have some explanation...
> >
> > It is about going fully into an activity, leaving nothing of 
yourself
> > behind. So you are like ash afterwards... who has read this book 
and
> > can explain?
> >
> > thanks!
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
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