Hi Mike, I think you have a point here when you are saying we have 
to make time for mindfulness. 

I started long ago myself with doing less at one time. Less 
distraction. Like not eating and watching television, but just eat. 
And not having the radio on while driving. I started with that 
before I even heard of Zen. And it works for me to bring more rest. 
If that is what Suzuki is trying to say, I get it and agree with him.

I appreciate your explanation how you handle it. And I agree that 
even in a busy schedule one can make time for mindfullness. 
Actually, I think one can only maintain busy schedules for some time 
if one is mindfull, not too much distracted. 

I have done a course on time management that was actually teaching 
to do one thing at a time. Main purpose of planning there is to be 
able to do only the task at hand. If a deadline can not be met, the 
time management method would show it in avance, so when doing a task 
you can fully concentrate on the task, without having to do other 
things at the same time to meet deadlines. The course also covered 
handling ad hoc interrupts - not everything is planable (yes, not 
everyting should be planable...). 

It is difficult to summarize this course in a few lines, sorry if I 
am not clear. But now I work mostly at one thing at a time and it 
gives a lot of rest. 

(Thinking it over now, this course could perhaps be sold as a Zen 
course ... 'Zen and the art of time management' ;-) )

But I think we have to agree that in real life one has to do 
multiple things at one time.

Eugene

--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Hansen" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> 
wrote:
>
> Hi again Eugene!
> 
> Here's something from that same book you're reading: (where it is 
in the
> book, I can't tell you...I found it on the internet and don't have 
my copy
> of the book on hand)
> 
> "So when you eat, just eat. Do not read a magazine, or think "I 
need to do
> something after lunch". Stop your mind. Right now, you are eating. 
Look at
> your food, smell the aroma, taste the flavor, feel the texture. 
After
> eating, you will be drinking water. Give it the same attention. 
And after
> that, you will be doing something else."
> 
> It would seem that Suzuki is an advocate of the "do one thing at a 
time"
> school.  I understand your concerns regarding life in "the real 
world" and
> those of us with a busy schedule.  To that end, I found a little 
something
> from a Rev. Master Daizui MacPhillamy, the contents of which can 
be found
> 
http://www.serenereflections.ca/Articles/2006/EveryMinuteMeditation.h
tml
> 
> A couple of interesting suggestions concerning how to deal with 
this:
> 
> 
> *"Doing One Thing at a Time*
> 
> *The reason for the first two steps is not hard to see: if we 
accept that
> truth is one and undivided, then it can only be realized by a mind 
which is
> itself unified and aware. Such one-pointedness and mindfulness are
> impossible when you are doing two things at once. Thus, when you 
practice
> mindfulness you refrain from eating breakfast, talking to your 
spouse, and
> watching the morning news at the same time. Planning your ten 
o'clock
> meeting while you drive to work is out; so is thinking about your 
vacation
> while you wash the dishes, worrying about your finances while you 
plant the
> garden, and even reading a magazine while you're on the toilet. *
> 
> *For most people there are many things which we could (or worse 
yet, should)
> be doing at any given time, and the temptation to do more than one 
is great.
> A person in this situation might find it helpful to add a "step 
zero" before
> the first of the five steps .Step zero is to decide what is the 
single most
> important thing to be doing at this moment. Then, do it." *
> 
> So it would seem that we have to "make time" for mindfulness.  
Myself,
> having not worked in almost two years due to injury, often take it 
for
> granted just how much time I have and how much I am able to do
> (practice-wise) because of not having "real life" demands.  So, 
I'll admit,
> my advice isn't the best for busy people.  However, when I was 
working, no
> matter how busy I was (often working 6-7 days a week, upwards of 
12 hours a
> day), I still found time, as often as possible, for "mindfulness 
days" where
> I was able to apply concepts such as doing one thing at a time.  
If I
> couldn't get a "mindfulness day" then maybe a "mindfulness hour" 
or even
> "mindfulness minute."
> I've probably gotten way off track here and should probably just 
shut up for
> now. :)
> 
> Disclaimer:  There isn't a "chance" that I'm wrong...it's more 
like a "high
> probability."  At any rate, I hope some of this helps.  :)
> 
> 
> Regards,
> Mike
> 
> 
> 
> On 5/3/06, Eugene <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> >
> > Thanks for your replies to my post, Mike, Blossom and Ahmed. You 
all
> > seem a bit unsure if your reply make sense, but to me they 
certainly
> > do.
> >
> > I hope Suzuki does NOT mean doing only one thing at a time, or 
like
> > Mike wrote: "If we're washing dishes, for instance, we should be
> >
> > washing dishes --not washing dishes, trying to balance our
> > checkbooks in our head, planning dinner, etc." That would 
perhaps be
> > feasible for a monk in a monastery, but would be very hard in 
normal
> > life. I imagine my neighbour, who is a mother of three children 
and
> > has to do lots of things at the same time: dressing one child,
> > watching after her other childs, in the meantime plan all 
activities
> > in order to have them all at school the right time while they are
> > already late. She cannot just focus fully on, for example, 
dressing
> > one child. Or, concerning my more simple life, I sometimes have 
to
> > prepare a meeting while driving my car, or type a mail while
> > monitoring if a collegue I have to speak has already entered.
> >
> > So I hope Ahmed is correct when he writes: "I think the passage 
you
> >
> > cited does not mean that one should do just one thing at a time
> > because what about multi-tasking? Is multi-tasking not a part of
> > one's Buddha nature?"
> >
> > But if multi-tasking is 'allowed in Zen' (don't hit me for this
> > phrase...), what does the text of Suzuki mean that I cited in my
> > previous post?
> >
> > Thanks for sharing your thoughts or giving your explanation!
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Ahmed <megamorphg@> wrote:
> > >
> > > I have read that book as well. So beautifully simple it puts me
> > into a
> > > trance when I read it.
> > >
> > > I think the passage you cited does not mean that one should do
> > just one
> > > thing at a time because what about multi-tasking? Is multi-
tasking
> > not a
> > > part of one's Buddha nature?
> > >
> > > The book "The Way of Zen" by Alan Watts spells this all out 
very
> > clearly
> > > especially where it goes into the details about worrying about
> > worrying and
> > > how we can actually never do anything wrong in Zen because
> > everything is
> > > natural. Even unnaturalness is natural. This is the reason why 
and
> > how one
> > > can just relax and let everything go.
> > >
> > > So what it means to me is be naturally in the moment without
> > carrying the
> > > previous moment (but really you can't ever "carry" the previous
> > moment--you
> > > only imagine it is so).
> > >
> > > (I probably didn't make any sense but I think the meaning is
> > clearer after
> > > reading Alan Watts book.)
> > >
> > >
> > > On 5/2/06, Eugene <eusvr@> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > I am reading the book Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind, of Shunryu
> > Suzuki -
> > > > an excellent book. It goes into depths while being
> > understandable.
> > > >
> > > > However, there is a concept in it I don't understand. I would
> > like to
> > > > have some explanation...
> > > >
> > > > It is about going fully into an activity, leaving nothing of
> > yourself
> > > > behind. So you are like ash afterwards... who has read this 
book
> > and
> > > > can explain?
> > > >
> > > > thanks!
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
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