Dylan,

I think the subway map has the right of it:  Plone is at the confluence of
open source, enterprise CMS, social & community CMS, and web publishing CMS. 
Plone is the only one occupying those three subway lines (four counting
OSS).  

At my day-job, we have a very small web team handling dozens of sites for a
center with 280+ staff.  We can't be experts at WordPress, SharePoint,
Plone, Drupal, Joomla!, CommunityManager, and whatever soup of the day hits
some manager's fancy.  We need to have a generalized toolset that's very,
very customizable so that we can use that toolset very effectively to solve
a huge host of problems.  Plone-Zope-Python with a heavy dose of CSS is that
toolset.  

Plone leverages our investment in training and experience by letting our web
team produce community collaboration sites, multi-language sites, embedded
blogs, wikis, & discussion areas, and just plain static websites.  Reducing
the webmaster/developer role as much as practical lets content owners really
own their content.  Top that with a security and workflow model that
PHP-based systems can't approach and you can see why we use Plone in our
particular environment.  

What I see then is Plone wearing several hats.  In my situation, I need lots
of hats but I don't have time, staff, and funds to become expert at an
entire hat rack full of different styles.  I need secure, flexible,
reliable, open source CMS technology that is based on a limited but powerful
toolset.  

-- Karl


Dylan Jay-5 wrote:
> 
> My question is, where would you put Plone on that graph?
> 
> And should we accept we need to position plone more clearly?
> ---
> Dylan Jay, Plone Solutions Manager
> www.pretaweb.com
> 

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