Hi Philip,

Well, mouse support is nice, but I'd definitely recommend joystick and
game pad support as well. Game's like Q9 are fine with the keyboard,
but if you added joystick support I think they would be not only more
fun with a joystick it also saves ware and tare on your keyboard.
Bottom line, a good joystick is pretty rugged, designed for heavy
button smashing, is more comfortable to hold, and moving a stick
left/right is more natural feeling than holding an arrow key down for
any length of time. I often get cramps in my hands and fingers playing
on a keyboard, but don't get cramps using a joystick in the same game.
Plus there are things you can do with a joystick that can't
necessarily be done with a keyboard.

For example, as you know when you press a key down it has two states
either pressed or released. That means if you want to go from a walk
to a run you must press two or more keys in tandem to alter the type
of movement. With a joystick there is the option to be more advanced
with the input. With a joystick the stick has a range from -5000 to
5000 along the x and y axis. That means you can actually adjust the
speed of the player's movement depending on how far the stick is moved
in that direction. If the stick is moved only slightly forward the
player might start off in a slow walk. If the stick is pushed forward
a little more the player speeds up to a fast walk. If the stick is all
the way forward the player speeds up to an all out run. This is imho
much more natural and the gamer can adjust the character's speed
simply by miner changes in the sticks position rather than having to
press multiple keys down or even press a button in tandem with the
stick. Make sense?

The last advantage I see with joysticks is force feedback technology.
Some people like it, and some don't. However, with force feedback you
can offer the gamer some extra sensory information that otherwise
wouldn't be given. Here are some practical examples of ff in use.

1. You can use the motor in the device to set the tention on the
stick. This is useful in several instances. If a gamer steps into
water you can tighten the tention on the stick to simulate the player
struggling against the current. Another case is in a racing simulation
you can tighten the stick or wheel to simulate actually driving a car
under those conditions.

2. Constant vibration. You can make the device vibrate to add the feel
of a car engine, helicopter, or something like a light saber. While
not necessary it is a bit of extra cool sensory feedback all the same.

3. Hit and recoil effects. I've seen game devices that really try to
give the end gamer a virtual reality effect by using realistic hit and
recoil effects using force feedback technology.
For example, quite some time back I saw a set of boxing gloves, that
looked like gloves, you slipped on to your hands. They had little tiny
motors in side and every time you scored a punch, a hit, on the other
player the gloves simulated the feel of punching the other player.
I've also seen joysticks that look like guns. Naturally, if your
player character is carrying a big shotgun or something like that
every time he/she fires the shotgun the game device, in this case a
gun with force feedback effect, should recoil simulating the feel of
firing a weapon like that.

Bottom line, you and I are in the virtual reality business. There are
plenty of advanced game devices in various forms, shapes, and sizes.
Regardless if that game device is a generic joystick or is in some
specialized form like a boxing glove, hunting rifle, or racing wheel
many of them offer force feedback technology that just can't be
replicated with a keyboard. Certainly a game engine as advanced as BGT
should offer not only basic joystick support, but in the future should
add more advanced support for force feedback devices.  Only in this
way we, as VI gamers, can even hope to catch up with mainstream
technology and games.

Cheers!


On 1/10/11, Philip Bennefall <phi...@blastbay.com> wrote:
> Hi all!
>
> I am happy to say that the BGT engine is selling well, and so I am working
> on a 1.1 release. I was wondering what you would most like to see
> implemented in the next version? About a week ago I added full mouse
> support, but the majority of the changes in this release are still bugfixes.
> I'd like to have one more interesting new feature before I release 1.1. Any
> suggestions?
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Philip Bennefall
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