Interesting info, I am getting a clearer picture of how these games are
played. Soon I hope to spend some time playing through some of them myself
and getting a handle on what is going on. My guess is that although there
are certain "accessibility" features as well as a trade-off of reaction time
and complexity, these games are complex and stimulating enough for my
purposes. Thanks again for all the great information, this is a new world to
me, but it represents a very very cool side of gaming that I had no idea
existed.

Thanks again,
Brian

On Fri, Jul 29, 2011 at 1:57 PM, Thomas Ward <thomasward1...@gmail.com>wrote:

> Hi Brian,
>
> Hmmm...That's sounds like a tall order. As I think Dark said earlier
> fast reaction time and keeping track of multiple things at once aren't
> necessarily how audio games are played. To explain that let me use
> Shades of Doom as an example.
>
> Yes, the game is in real time, and a gamer can use his or her ears to
> identify the location of multiple enemies and items in the room.
> Experienced players such as myself are very good at that and I can
> track and kill multiple enemy creatures based on sound alone. However,
> Shades of Doom also has a few accessibility features that you wouldn't
> necessarily find in a video game.
>
> I could at any time press the d key, which would freeze the game, and
> bring up a spoken menu of enemies and items in the room. Down arrowing
> through such a list might tell me there is a cyborg straight ahead, a
> mutant human to the left, and a med kit to the right. This in effect
> is like calling a time out, allowing me to look at the room, and when
> I press excape to resume game play I have a more specific idea of
> where everything is located in relation to my player character.  This
> pausing the game now and then to look around simply isn't something a
> sighted player would do with a video game, but such features exist in
> Shades of Doom and other audio games to help people who are having
> difficulty with keeping track of multiple things at once in real time.
> I generally don't use this feature myself as I don't need it, but
> there are players I know of who use that d key as a life line.
>
> Cheers!
>
>
> On 7/29/11, brian glass <brigl...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Hi Jim,
> >
> > Thanks for the information. It sounds like you have a lot of experience
> in
> > this industry. I am looking for a game which requires fast reaction time,
> > but also for you to keep track of a lot of things going on at once, which
> is
> > why I thought strategy games would be best for my purposes. I am really
> > trying to tax the user, to keep him/her engaged as well as offer a
> > stimulating experience which can keep the player interested for roughly
> 50
> > hours of total gaming (over the course of about 8 weeks)
> >
> > Thanks for your help,
> > Brian
>
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