well tom its safe to say that most of us here are just starting.
Most don't have your background.
I sertainly don't.
When I started the most complex game I knew was intergalactic battle a graphics/menu game.
Yes compaired to mainstream we are probably not that attractive.
The point is that we have been stagnating in emulated arcade.
Its not a bad thing but if we need to move foreward we will have to bite the bullet and try to go mainstream etc.
Which brings up an interesting thing.
Unless you are sighted and know what stuff was then you won't know what to really do.
I have never been sighted in my life.
You can go left right up down run left and right and jump.
I know that mainstream stuff goes so much more than that.
But there are limits in sounds, the number of sounds, etc.
Then there is the fact most of us don't have updated equipment.
And even if we have its not the most up to date.
Ie I have what would be quite an ancient second generation dulecore with no real hard drive or memmory requirements running on an extremely insecure os, and old ish hardware that won't go anywhere and being unable to run major things. We are limited at least for a while to the fact most people will still have 32 bit systems.
I know for a fact a few still have single core systems.
Some may still use dos 6 and win98 still.
With acceptions with those with linux or apple mac systems Hmmm not sure.
Basically we are stuck with simple for a while I think until we get 64 bit fully then we will be behind again.


So before we move foreward we need some online servey For our systems and what features etc we could have in a game or just the system specs. We need to know how many have medium spec systems like mine, to really old, to new to whatever, what os and what stuff we will want. I am thinking of making a test servey on surveymonkey or something just to see what things are like.
At 03:16 a.m. 1/08/2011, you wrote:
Hi Jeremy,

Those are some very good points. In many ways when I joined the audio
games community I had similar observations and I guess ideas where the
community could go. That was about 10 or 11 years ago.

I was sighted for the majority of my early life, lost my sight
officially in the 90's, so I had a pretty good idea of what had been
available for the sighted mainstream market at the time. When i
started reading the mag so I could find out what games I could play or
expect to create I saw that most people were playing text adventures
or simple Dos games  like Monopoly, Hangman, and things of that
nature. The only developer who captured my immediate attention was GMA
because they had a real time submarine simulation, Lone Wolf, and they
were creating the world's first audio based first person shooter,
Shades of Doom. Coming from a mainstream background as I had those
were the games I naturally were most interested in because it wasn't
so different from games I already knew and enjoyed before I lost my
sight. In other words if we want to communicate and open dialog with
other mainstream gamers its something like Shades of Doom or Tank
Commander they will be interested in discussing. Anything less will
seem to them as not very advanced or worth while. At least that's how
I see it coming from that background myself.

It is because of that background I have the opinions and attitudes I
do have towards audio gaming. There is a reason I spent two years
developing a 3d game engine I call Genesis 3D, and there is a reason
I've adopted a number of features seen in the GMA Game engine. That
reason being over the next five years or so I plan to create games on
par with Halo, Tomb Raider, Jedi Knight, and any other game that has
had some commercial success in the mainstream market. Not necessarily
because it will make a lot of money but because it is a style and
standard of gaming that is rarely achieved by audio game developers
accept for a handful like GMA who are trying to reach the same goal as
I am.

What you are doing for this community is no less valuable. Castaways
is the best game I've seen since I don't know when. True it needs some
better sound effects and things like that, but as Dark said it is the
closest thing to Dwarf Fortress and games like that we have at the
time being. It is getting us headed in the right direction as far as I
am concerned and I'm all forward to bigger and more complex games of
this nature.

Cheers!


On 7/31/11, Jeremy Kaldobsky <jer...@kaldobsky.com> wrote:
> Clearly I'm the "new guy" around here, so I frequently ask dumb questions,
> surprise everyone by not knowing common things, and fail miserably while
> playing most audio games, Hahaha.  In one way, this is a good thing since I
> am still able to see things in this community from the perspective of an
> outsider.  As a new guy coming in, I was very excited to go and read the
> back issues of the magazine when I first heard about them.  I wasn't
> actually all that long ago either.
>
> The old magazines were quite old, but I still enjoyed the articles.  Game
> reviews were interesting, but by far, the most interesting things were the
> articles that gave insight to the community, what it had been doing, and
> where it was planning to go. Perhaps this was only so interesting because I
> was viewing past issues, and I could compare those goals with how things
> really turned out, but I still believe I would be just as interested in
> those types of articles today.
>
> Some have suggested that the magazine should keep in mind, the possibility
> that mainstream gamers will read it, and so it should paint the community in > the best possible light. I agree, that is something we should consider, but > I have to ask the question, what is do we hope to gain by mainstream readers > that we impress with the magazine? If our concern is audiogames being taken
> seriously, then we could accomplish that by including only the more unique
> games, as has been suggested. I have a feeling that we need to broaden that
> goal.  I would suggest that a secondary goal is to attract people TO! the
> community, that would be able to help it continue to push forward.
>
> The articles are the best way to do that.  By getting insight into the
> community, where it was, how it has changed, what it hopes to accomplish,
> and what efforts are currently trying to move us forward, it encourages
> people to theorize their own solutions.  As an example, my buddy Hatred
> recently joined up with the community.  Through conversations, he gradually
> learned the current state of the community, and where it wanted to go, and
> eventually he started sharing ideas with me for helping it get there. Stuff
> that would pop into his mind simply because there was a problem to solve,
> and he is the type of person who enjoys looking for solutions. Like myself,
> he became excited by the challenge of moving the community's games in some
> new directions, and now he is actively developing his first audio game.
> Lol, Hatred is going to kill me for pulling him into this post.  :)
>
> Anyway, the point I was aiming to make is that openly discussing where we
> want to go, and how we are trying to get there, is a great way to attract
> new problem solvers.  If the magazine reaches the right kind of people, who
> get excited about what is going on here in this community, it could lead to
> more good things.
>
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