> > > Firstly ALWAYS run anti-virus software.. either that or shut down your
> > > email
> > > both will do the same job.
> > I don't get the people that can state this with such certainty.  I
refuse
> to
> > run an antivirus program on my computer, however have shut down all the
> > 'bonus' features of Outlook so that all emails are opened in a
completely
> > restricted zone and have all the latest patches installed (as per
windows
> > update anyway).  I've never run into any problems with viruses... (as of
> > yet...)
> >
>
> What are these "bonus" features, and does this apply to MS Outlook
Express?
>
> ~ ~ ~
>
> > This depends on whether he is running a NAT DSL router or whether he is
> just
> > using a computer connected via a DSL modem to the internet.  If he's
using
> a
> > NAT DSL router, then the effort of connecting a computer up in the DMZ
of
> > his local network (ie such that all unallocated port requests go to that
> > server) opens the network up to far more risk than if he just left an
> > explicit firewall off in the first place.
> >
>
> OK, now I really am lost . . .
>
> I am not sure if this applies to me with my DI-804, or what it means if it
> does.

That means yes, you have a NAT router.  The router will have two IP
addresses, one assigned by your ISP which is possibly dynamic, and the other
which should be statically assigned.  All of your comptuer attached to it
only communicate with the private IP interface (ie 192.168.1.1 or 10.0.0.1
etc).  The PC's themselves would get assigned dynamic IP addresses (via
DHCP) from the router.  They will become 192.168.10.2->192.168.10.254, or
10.0.0.2->10.0.0.254.  The only means of access to the internet for that
network is through the router.  However, if a device on the internet side of
the router sends a packet to that router with a stupid port number (ie one
that hasn't previously been opened) then the router will just reject the
request, you may be able to set up how it does that (ie reject reply or just
drop).  If the port has previously been dynamically opened by the router
from a request by a client on your network then the packet will be forwarded
to the PC that made the request.  You should be able to set up blocking
rules (ie I never want to receive connections from IP address x.x.x.x etc).
The key thing to do is to login to your router and shut down all the
assigned static ports that you don't use, ie HTTP/FTP/SMTP/POP _server_
ports, normally they get special exemptions from the normal request/reply
procedure owing to them being servers and normally not sending a request for
info before actually receiving it...

Any more detail you should be able to get from some online books or the like
on networking.

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