I know it was an Ultimate. I worked with MCD during that time and they used
the ultimate x's somewhat for comparison purposes. I worked with Ted in
1978-79 before he spun off from 4 Gary Rd.

Again, what would an 'x' be in MHZ. Or for that fact, what would a MCD
spirit 600 be. One of my clients still has one and I could reference it
against some of my 2.4Ghz D3 clients.

my 1 cent.
----- Original Message -----
From: "Roger Glenfield" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "U2 Users Discussion List" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2004 11:17 AM
Subject: RE: How far can U2 scale?


> Circa 1983-85.  I'm pretty sure that Ted was showing off a Honeywell Level
6
> and not a Microdata.
>
> Ultimate's X calculations were based on the native speed of the cpu.
>
> Original Level 6, circa 1979-81 = 1x
> The 5x board came out in 1982-83.  If I remember correctly, my tests
showed
> the speed was more like 3-4 times faster.  But you could add a bunch more
> terminals without slowing down.
> I never saw a 7x and don't know when it came out.
> We had one site that needed a 10x, but Ultimate and Honeywell Bull Germany
> couldn't keep the machine stable.  So the site went to another platform.
>
> At least that's my 20 year old recollections.
> Roger
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
> > Behalf Of Mark Johnson
> > Sent: Saturday, April 24, 2004 12:55 AM
> > To: U2 Users Discussion List
> > Subject: Re: How far can U2 scale?
> >
> >
> > A bit of history here. I'm sure that these high user counts all
> > participate
> > with telnet connections. Back in the day, I believe circa 1983-5, Ted
> > Sabarese, president of Ultimate, illustrated one of the highest number
of
> > connected *serial* terminals on one system. It was an interesting
> > photograph
> > as he lined up 1,000 dumb terminals on the bleachers at a local
> > high school
> > and had them all BLOCK-PRINTing something like their port number.
> >
> > I don't exactly remember the machine's specs, but given the Microdatas
of
> > that time it probably had 260MB disc drive, 8 MB of 'core' memory and
the
> > latest '14x' processor. Boy, I wish I knew what those speeds of
> > those older
> > systems were in today's terms. 2x, 7x, 14x...What's an 'x'?  IIRC, the
> > original IBM-PC was 4.7Mhz.
> >
> > My 4.7 cents.
> >
> >
>
>
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