Hello Lluis,
 
Nice to have you on the forum. 
 
Theravada, Mahayana, Vajrayana and zen are all in the same family. We are also 
going through 'globalization', so exchanges of ideas are inevitable. Mahayana 
particularly stresses compassion. That is the key Bodhisatva's idea. Do you 
think zen is lacking in compassion? If somebody says that, I would have 
difficulty in opposing.
 
Anthony

--- On Wed, 3/11/10, Lluís Mendieta <lme...@intermail.es> wrote:


From: Lluís Mendieta <lme...@intermail.es>
Subject: Re: [Zen] Re: FW: Quote from St. Thomas Aquinas
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, 3 November, 2010, 5:24 AM


  




Good evening to all
Just a new member, that feels buddhist, albeit in Mahayana or Tantrayana, not 
exactly Zen
 
In Buddhism, as I understand, nothing is "ones personal".
All is for all sentient beings.
Compassion is not a badge.
Is what we should feel, as we need as a whole
 
We all should reach nirvana. And no one will be free when still any sentient 
being has not reached nirvana. Or so I have understood. And I know that is 
hard, specially for me that I am not native english speaker, to verbalize such 
concepts
Boddhishatva will explain...
 
Anyway, my best wihes to all and my special wishes to the moderator who invited 
me (sorry, still tied to mundane things)
And,as I learned in other forum, peace
 
With best wishes
 
Lluís

----- Original Message ----- 
From: ED 
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Tuesday, November 02, 2010 3:20 PM
Subject: [Zen] Re: FW: Quote from St. Thomas Aquinas

  



 
Bill wrote:
> [Bill!] I understand 'compassion' to mean 'to be aware of the feelings of
> others'. Merriam-Webster Online defines it as "sympathetic consciousness of
> others' distress together with a desire to alleviate it". That definition
> satisfies me.
 
Bill, Bill, Bill,
The definition is consonant with ones I have seen in Buddhist texts. 
However, questions come to mind (as usual):
o   Is possessing 'compassion' a badge of merit, or is it a normal and natural 
aspect of human nature?
o   Is not  "sympathetic consciousness of others' distress together with a 
desire to alleviate it" none other than a stipulation that a person not possess 
genes for autism?
o  And when we do experience compassion, is it not usually selectively directed 
toward persons we feel connected to in some way?
o  For instance, do we feel compassion for the million-plus war-widows caused 
by the US/UK/Australian invasion of Iraq?
--ED
 
--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, <billsm...@...> wrote:
>
> Ed, Ed, Ed…
> 
> I posted a quote attributed to St. Thomas Aquinas:
> 
> "I would rather feel compassion than know the meaning of it."
> 
> You then asked:
> 
> [Ed] Wherein do you perceive any intelligence or wisdom in St.
> Augustine's preference?

> [Bill!] I don't perceive any intelligence in St. Aquinas' statement above.
> I do however perceive a lot of wisdom. I perceive the wisdom in his stated
> preference for experience over knowledge.
> 
> [Ed] What does St. Augustine mean by 'compassion'?

> [Bill!] I don't know and I don't care. The meaning of compassion is not
> important in the quote, in fact the quote itself says that. You can
> substitute any word you want for 'compassion' in his quote and the wisdom
> will still be there.

> [Ed] What do you understand 'compassion' to be?
> [Bill!] I understand 'compassion' to mean 'to be aware of the feelings of
> others'. Merriam-Webster Online defines it as "sympathetic consciousness of
> others' distress together with a desire to alleviate it". That definition
> satisfies me.
> ...Bill!
 







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