Bruno, Please excuse my bottom posting but my gmail acct prevents me from
interleaving my responses.


On Sat, Apr 13, 2013 at 9:21 AM, Richard Ruquist <yann...@gmail.com> wrote:

> I have tried to study the UDA but lack sufficient understanding to see how
> the UDA could compute an infinite number of paths or universes as in the
> diffraction example I discussed.
>
>
> On Sat, Apr 13, 2013 at 7:40 AM, Bruno Marchal <marc...@ulb.ac.be> wrote:
>
>>
>> On 12 Apr 2013, at 17:07, Richard Ruquist wrote:
>>
>> Telmo,
>>
>> I can only give you my opinion. You are of course referring to the double
>> slit experiment where one photon can follow at least two different paths,
>> and potentially an infinite number of paths.
>>
>> But even diffraction of a single photon will do that: in the simplest
>> case send a photon on to a semi-infinite metallic plane and the photon
>> potentially scatters into an infinite number of paths from the edge of the
>> plane. We only know which path when the photon reaches a detector plane on
>> the far side. The actual deterministic diffraction pattern only emerges
>> when the number of photons sent approaches infinity in plane waves. The
>> actual path of a single photon is random within the constraints of the
>> infinite-photon diffraction pattern.
>>
>> So I say the way to deal with that is to propagate a large number of
>> photons or do an EM wave calculation for the diffraction pattern.
>>
>> I wonder how comp treats such single photon instances. Does it use
>> algorithms that are random number generators?
>>
>>
>> No, it uses the first person indeterminacy in self-multiplication, which
>> explains where the quantum wave comes from. I have explained this on this
>> list and published it a long time ago. That is why I told you that if you
>> take comp into consideration, you must derive QM and perhaps string theory
>> (if it is correct) from addition and multiplication of the natural numbers.
>> I see you have not yet studied or grasped the UDA :)
>>
>> Bruno
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Richard
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 10:35 AM, Telmo Menezes 
>> <te...@telmomenezes.com>wrote:
>>
>>> On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 4:24 PM, Richard Ruquist <yann...@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>> > Mathematics itself seems rather magical.
>>> > For instance the sum 1+2+3+4+5.....infinity = -1/12
>>> >
>>> > And according to Scott Aaronson's new book
>>> > when string theorists estimate the mass of a photon
>>> > they get two components: one being 1/12
>>> > and the other being that sum, so the mass is zero,
>>> > thanks to Ramanujan
>>> >
>>> > If that sum is cutoff at some very large number but less than infinity,
>>> > does anyone know the value of the summation.?
>>>
>>> Hi Richard,
>>>
>>> Ok, but in that case physics is deterministic, just hard to compute.
>>> How do we then deal with the fact that two photons under the precise
>>> same conditions can follow two different paths (except for some hidden
>>> variable we don't know about)? I'm not a physicist and way over my
>>> head here, so this is not a rhetorical question.
>>>
>>>
>>> >
>>> > On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 10:15 AM, Telmo Menezes <
>>> te...@telmomenezes.com>
>>> > wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >> On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 3:30 AM, Stathis Papaioannou <
>>> stath...@gmail.com>
>>> >> wrote:
>>> >> > On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 at 5:35 AM, Craig Weinberg <
>>> whatsons...@gmail.com>
>>> >> > wrote:
>>> >> >>
>>> >> >>
>>> >> >> On Thursday, April 11, 2013 3:29:51 PM UTC-4, John Clark wrote:
>>> >> >>>
>>> >> >>> On Thu, Apr 11, 2013 Craig Weinberg <whats...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >> >>>
>>> >> >>>> > If matter is deterministic, how could it behave in a random
>>> way?
>>> >> >>>
>>> >> >>>
>>> >> >>> It couldn't.
>>> >> >>
>>> >> >>
>>> >> >> Are you saying then that matter is random, or that it is neither
>>> random
>>> >> >> nor
>>> >> >> deterministic?
>>> >> >
>>> >> > Matter behaves randomly, but probability theory allows us to make
>>> >> > predictions about random events.
>>> >>
>>> >> In my view, randomness = magic.
>>> >> The MWI and Comp are the only theories I've seen so far that do not
>>> >> require magic to explain observed randomness.
>>> >>
>>> >> >
>>> >> > --
>>> >> > Stathis Papaioannou
>>> >> >
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>>
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