On 26 Sep 2013, at 07:27, chris peck wrote:

Hi Liz

Interesting. There's another thought experiment, or gambit, MWIers raise involving quantum immortality.

In this, some quantum event at time t triggers a gun to shoot (or not shoot) the MWIer.

Traditionally, MWIers argue the only reason they would not take the gambit is because they would leave behind grieving family in one MWI branch. They are not in any doubt over whether they would survive in the other branch. Thus, in this case the probabilities are governed by a conjunction. They are both convinced they will be killed and convinced they will survive. There is no 1-p indeterminacy about either prior to the quantum event.

There is no 3-p indeterminacy (he will both be killed), nor 1-p indeterminacy (I will survive).




Now the logic of q-immortality and your MWI analog of Bruno's thought experiment seem to me to be the same. But, the MWIers apparently treat the two inconsistently. How can one be uncertain about whether one will be in Moscow in one experiment but certain about surviving in the other? Do you see my problem?

I do not see any problem. The 1-p indeterminacy bears only on the computations where we survive. That is why we have to prune out the continuation where we die formally this will be given by the intensional nuance of provability/believability).

It *is* counter-intuitive, but, as you saw, no more than in Everett QM.

Bruno



> Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 22:00:55 -0700
> From: meeke...@verizon.net
> To: everything-list@googlegroups.com
> Subject: Re: What gives philosophers a bad name?
>
> On 9/25/2013 8:37 PM, LizR wrote:
> > Anyone who has a problem with Bruno's teleportation thought experiment should logically > > have the same problem with the MWI. If for the sake of argument I use a quantum event to > > decide whether to get on a plane to Moscow or Washington, then my diary will contain one > > or the other destination - in two universes - and the concept of "I" has to take into
> > account that this is the case.
>
> Unless you take Scott Aaronson's view that teleportation requires transmitting the quantum > state to Moscow, in which case the no-cloning theorem implies that the original in
> Helsinki is destroyed.
>
> I think that the relevant structure of the brain is quasi- classical and so a classical > copying will produce a working copy with a gap in memory, just like anesthesia. But that > also implies that the two copies will immediately be distinct. They don't have to wait to
> look outside.
>
> Brent
>
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