Hi Dark,
This is precisely why I myself am struggling for game ideas. Finding exactly the right storyline and getting all the right resources is something of a costly challenge, both in money and imagination. The fact of the matter is, sound effects, music libraries and voice actors cost a heck of a lot of money, so much in fact, that most developers are actually paying more than they are receiving through sales. I can completely understand why some developers have decided to shut up shop. I dread to think what it must have cost Lighttech to have to release all their games for free just because they were starting out in the business and probably, like me among others, felt incompetent enough to sell things that maybe considered a clone or low quality because people are now expecting a lot more advanced titles. I bet if I had released Acefire during the trend for other smaller game like the Accessible Games stuff (Battleships etc), I probably would have gotten a lot more respect for it than I did releasing it 3 years ago. As it was, I can totally understand everyone's downheartedness on it. We have games like Tank Commander out there for as little as $30, why should we pay $25 for a very simple game based on chance and a little strattegy? The fact was made worse in that I, unlike most of the other game devs, am from the UK and must therefore balance out what I paid for in pounds to what then had to be converted from US dollars. I am now having to almost literally, it feels, eat my mind out and push my programming skills to the limit to try and come up with a game that you all will like to try and make at least a little bit off it, hence the reason it is taking so long for me to come out with a big release. I'm not trying to say this to make anyone feel guilty or small, but rather to state my opinion as to why audiogaming seems to have fizzled out somewhat. The only reason I am continuing to develop games is for personal gratification. If you guys like it as well that's a bonus, and if my title is as good as for you to buy it that's an extra bonus.
Hey, this in itself is a good idea for a game. Grin.
Regards,
Damien.


----- Original Message ----- From: "dark" <d...@xgam.org>
To: "Gamers Discussion list" <gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2011 4:53 PM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] the spirit of game production - Re: brings backmemories - Re: Fw: BlindSoftware.comBlog Feed


Hi Tom.

Amusing, angela in an empty level? ---- that would be a pain to get past, the vacuume of the ancients! ;D.

I must confess, having had to monitor most of the releases over the last few years I don't think your correct in terms of saying we've missed out on a boom in games, rather I'd say that at the moment the emphasis has changed.

Back when Gma, bsc and presumably esp were working ten years ago, it seems a lot of developers had the thought of creating games of the 80's and 90's in an accessible form, just as Dan and justin said in the troop podcast.

There then seemed to be a boom on such games, alien outback, pipe, the original plans for monti, superliam, jim kitchins' Mac1 game etc.

Obviously though like everything else, there was a boom and bust syndrome and people's expectations and desires changed. People started to say "we've got enough wrack up score style affairs, what next?"

I even remember when Liam released judgement day, there were those who's reaction was "oooh no, not another one"

now, it seems we have two catagories of games. Free or fun affairs which are made either by start out devs with bgt, or by experienced devs for fun, which tend to be arcade games but don't tend to wrack up a huge amount of interest, and serious! games, which have huge amounts of options, levels, game modes or whatever.

Of course like any trend there are some exceptions such as Q9, but generally it seems now the average accessible game player has higher expectations of what they will play, and what they expect if paying for a game, than previously.

Were bsc to release something like troopanum now, the reaction I think would be "what, ---- you expect us to pay money for something like this?"

This is however just the way game developement seems to work. from the players perspective it's a difference in demand and supply, while from the developers' it's a different spur to your creative talent, ---- sinse like anything else artistic which you put your own time and effort into, your own individually created game has to be! individually yours even if it is created with community in put.

That's again a nice aspect of the gaming community, such things can be discussed, tested, thought over etc, rather than some big evil company boss saying "make this, sinse we sell more of these and the advertizing says it'll appeal to people"

This is just what Mr. Marx meant when he spoke about the alienation of labour, and the online community is a pretty good example of something which doesn't fall into that very nasty hole.

But before I go into a socialist wrant i'll stop ;D.

Beware the grue!

Dark.

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