hi Jeremy and all,
Email me off list at the below address if you like and we can go over the jaws .api stuff. however, if you've done much research, I'm sure you've run across Jamal's say tools, which I'm not sure how it works with v b 6, but i'm sure it works, and I would look into going that route first, as it covers several of the main screenreaders in one package. regarding thomases comparison of Jeremy's s games to MOTA and all that, I gotta say, not a lot of that holds water, and I'm not really even sure why Thomas made that post, as I could see no comparisons being made to MOTA, Raceway, etc.. yeah, sound effects take some time to record and edit, but implementation isn't much at all if your setup correctly. Even if Jeremy spent 3 times his coding cycle working on sound effects, we'd have some pretty kick butt stuff in less than a month. I think the bottom line is Jeremy is just a really efficient and excellent programmer, with a lot of focus and the ability to get his ideas implemented without wasting much time and being distracted with other crap along the way.
    I for one am envious of his ability's and hope he can keep it up.
I also agree that completely fleshing out a game with full sound effects, getting full screenreader support in there and all that, then charging a reasonable price for his games would be a great thing all around. It would make Jeremy some extra cash, it would give us some excellent games, and hopefully inspire others to take up coding games for us.
  anyhow, my two cents.
  Che
blindadrenal...@gmail.com


On 7/15/2011 10:59 PM, Thomas Ward wrote:
Hi,

No kidding. Jeremy seems to program new games with inhuman speed.
Speeds I myself can't even match without a lot of time and energy.

Actually, that said, Jeremy has a number of factors in his favor that
allows him to produce these games faster than someone like myself.
Which makes all the difference, and those of you who aren't
programmers probably aren't aware of these factors.

First, Jeremey is programming in Visual Basic. From the start the
language was designed to be easy to learn, easy to program, and was
designed for rapid development and deployment. Although, Visual Basic
6 has now been completely fazed out in favor of languages like C# .Net
and Visual Basic .Net they both were designed for rapid development
and deployment as well. In short, what I'm saying is that the ability
to get things done quickly and simply is in large part do to the
language Jeremy is using.

For someone like myself it takes a lot longer because I've taken a
more traditional programming route and base my code on C++. Compared
to a rapid development/deployment language like Visual Basic or one of
the newer .Net languages C++ is something on par with climbing a
mountain, or so it seems to me. C++ is more technical, and certain
libraries are more bare bones requiring some extra steps in developing
software.

Second, issue is Jeremy largely relies on third-party speech support
like Jaws, Window-eyes, NVDA, or Sapi. This obviously speeds up the
process because he can send text to whatever speech service is
available and speak it. It is in its own way as easy as printing text
to the screen once you have the speech services initialized and
running.

However, many accessible game developers llike GMA, PCs Games, and
myself use prerecorded speech for our games. You have no idea how long
it takes to first record, edit, and then write the code to load/speak
the message. i'd say it takes three or four times longer to do that
alone.

Third, Jeremy is targeting a specific platform and target group.
Obviously since his games are only intended for MS Windows platforms
he has lots of options and choices when it comes to programming APIs
etc. It takes less time to create software for one target environment
and considerably more if a developer wants to target Mac or Linux.

This imho is one area where I myself lost considerable time. I spent
months looking at various cross-platform APIs, experimenting with
potential cross-platform betas, which only ended up delaying the
process. If I had skipped the cross-platform research altogether
Mysteries of the Ancients would have been completed long ago.

Finally, the time it takes to create a game largely depends on the
type of game being produced. Castaways for example seems more complex
than it really is from a programming standpoint.  Were I to write
something similar given the same factors above I could probably
produce something equal in a weeks time period too.

One of the things that speeds up development in this type of game is
Jeremeyhas very minimal sounds and music. He hasn't had to deal with
loading, playing, and processing hundreds of sounds in real time.
Producing a soundscape as complex as Tank Commander or Shades of Doom
takes lots more time. Writing a good high qualityaudio environment is
in its way like adding graphics and animations to a video game. That
is where a large majority of programming takes place in initial
development.

Another thing is Mysteries of the Ancients both 2d and 3d are actually
more complex from a programming perspective. We have hundreds of
items, monsters, etc all operating in real time. Just to move the
character alone requires a number of separate actions like running,
jumping, walking, climbing, swimming, not to mention opening doors,
picking up items, and fighting monsters. Basically, the scope of the
project has far more underlying code than you might expect, and I'm
betting Castaways isn't nearly as big as MOTA in terms of how many
lines of code it takes to operate.

I don't know how many lines of code are in Castaways but i can say
MOTA beta 21 is closing in on 50,000 lines of code. So that's
something like 833 pages of closely typed text. I'm pretty sure Jeremy
hasn't written more than 800 pages of code in a week. Now, you know
why Mysteries of the Ancients is taking forever and Castaways is being
produced at inhuman speed. :D

Cheers!

On 7/15/11, Yohandy<yohand...@gmail.com>  wrote:
Jeremy,
You can't be human man. nope. you're some kind of robot or something. how on
earth can you possibly program complex games so quickly? It's totally
ridiculous. in a good way of course :D. have you realized the business
potential? I'm scared to imagine what you'd whip up if you start working on
a commercial audio game for like 6 to 8 months. I bet the game would be so
good that you'll be able to sell it for around $60 with no problems. and
most people will buy it! look at your games right now? everyone's
downloading and playing them. that's what I call a successful developer!
selling games is definitely something for you to consider I think. anyone
else agree? Also, since you're fully sighted, it wouldn't necessarily need
to be audio-based only. you could whip up some graphics and sell it to
everyone! ok I'm getting a bit excited here haha. one thing we desperately
need I think are beat-em-ups. or fighting games in general. not every blind
person is willing to try something like Mortal Kombat or Street Fighter no
matter how much those of us that play try to convince them that they're
accessible enough. Also thing     with these fighting games is many of them
are console based. I personally would love to play something like Streets of
Rage online with other audio gamers.









----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeremy Kaldobsky"<jer...@kaldobsky.com>
To: "Gamers Discussion list"<gamers@audyssey.org>
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 9:39 PM
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] Castaways, 1 week milestone reached!


Boy I wish I didn't have to work, lol, I wouldn't have to stop coding!  :D

If you do end up donating, believe me, it will be greatly appreciated.  In

fact, you would be my first donater!  I don't think donater is actually a
word, but oh well.

Well sadly I'm heading out, have fun guys!

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