Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-23 Thread Martijn Hoekstra
Jussi, I'm not finding the post you are replying too, what's the context here?

On Sat, Jun 23, 2012 at 3:29 AM, Jussi-Ville Heiskanen
cimonav...@gmail.com wrote:
 The core problem here is that the Board is not alive and well.
 The Board of Trustees is dead in their shoes. What precisely
 are they *Trustees* of?

 --
 --
 Jussi-Ville Heiskanen, ~ [[User:Cimon Avaro]]

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-22 Thread Jussi-Ville Heiskanen
The core problem here is that the Board is not alive and well.
The Board of Trustees is dead in their shoes. What precisely
are they *Trustees* of?

-- 
--
Jussi-Ville Heiskanen, ~ [[User:Cimon Avaro]]

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Seth Finkelstein
Reply-To: 
References: CAHRTtW_LoeHFcPb6vUmw7BwOqJECuvSR1-gqNWcC7kmZ=nf...@mail.gmail.com
In-Reply-To: 
CAHRTtW_LoeHFcPb6vUmw7BwOqJECuvSR1-gqNWcC7kmZ=nf...@mail.gmail.com

 Andreas Kolbe
 As Seth Finkelstein pointed out the other day, there is opposition to
 pornography both from the right, on a family values basis, and from the
 left, from feminists countering male bias. These are quite separate, but
 equally valid concerns.

Thanks for the mention. It's good to know that someone, somewhere,
reads what I write. But, just to clarify, let me stress I was being
merely *descriptive* there, rather than *prescriptive*. The context was
I had suggested that the Wikipedia _Signpost_ cover Larry Sanger's
recent material. Someone replied mentioning the antiporn-feminist view
(and opposing it). This originated from a gendergap list discussion,
but I didn't know that at the time, and so I was confused about why
Larry Sanger was being taken to be making those types of objections.
Hence I replied:

http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wikipedia:Wikipedia_Signpost/Newsroom/Suggestionsdiff=prevoldid=495437291

I don't think Sanger is making any sort of (my gloss) 
gender feminist critique, but rather taking the standard
(again, simplifying) family values type position. While someone
involved in the topic might have such a view, and certainly there have
been alliances of convenience, I don't see it as being a part of what
he wrote in specific and what's he's attempting to do (except again as
an alliance). He probably would object to the following
characterization, but I'd say he's taking the older right-wing
anti-porn stance, rather than the newer left-wing anti-porn stance.

This was not meant as my endorsing both sides. It was more along
the lines of Tom Lehrer's song National Brotherhood Week:

Oh, the Protestants hate the Catholics
And the Catholics hate the Protestants
And the Hindus hate the Muslims
And everybody hates the Jews

As in:

Oh, the Fundamentalists hate the Feminists
And the Feminists hate the Fundamentalists
And the Wingnuts hate the Moonbats
And everybody hates the porn

There's many different issues which get lumped together. I do think
Larry Sanger raises *some* valid points, and it bothers me immensely
when he gets treated in the style of kill-the-apostate. But I don't
agree with everything he says or tries to do, and I feel I need to
repeatedly made that clear, since I get flack from some people who
want to use me as an available scapegoat for their dislike of critics.

Metaphorically, I've shed a lot of my blood in defense of
civil-liberties on the Internet (my regret over how this harmed my
life sometimes discomfits people). Anyway, these days, I don't feel
any desire to argue ideological pornography theories (it's not going
to matter here anyway). But I'm interested in how this all turns out
in terms of the various factions at odds with each other.

-- 
Seth Finkelstein  Consulting Programmer  http://sethf.com
Infothought blog - http://sethf.com/infothought/blog/
Interview: http://sethf.com/essays/major/greplaw-interview.php

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Anthony
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:01 AM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 4:46 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 6:03 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 {{sofixit}}, just like any area with NPOV/undue weight issues.

 The next day someone will fix it back. - Douglas Hofstadter

 Such is the nature of this project. If no one ever did anything
 because of that possibility, no one would ever do anything at all.

Well, it's not just that it's possible, it's that I judge the
probability to be very high.

 Rather, many of us believe that it
 would be irresponsible to implement censorship on an uncensored,
 comprehensive educational project.

 I have no
 problem with developing best practices, and certainly I don't think
 anyone will argue that we should host or retain porn or near-porn
 involving kids

 Certainly some people will argue this.  I believe that, fortunately,
 most of them are banned, though.

 Uh...wow. One would hope so. I don't believe that's very common,
 though. Certainly no one I've heard arguing against censorship is in
 favor of that.

But a policy against porn or near-porn involving kids *is* censorship,
is it not?

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Todd Allen
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:18 AM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:01 AM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 4:46 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 6:03 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 {{sofixit}}, just like any area with NPOV/undue weight issues.

 The next day someone will fix it back. - Douglas Hofstadter

 Such is the nature of this project. If no one ever did anything
 because of that possibility, no one would ever do anything at all.

 Well, it's not just that it's possible, it's that I judge the
 probability to be very high.

Then, if your proposed change is opposed by a significant number of
people, it would tend to indicate it has not gained consensus. That,
too, is the nature of the beast, when working on a project like this.
I think we've all had an idea we strongly believe to be right fail to
gain the consensus that would be needed to implement it.


 Rather, many of us believe that it
 would be irresponsible to implement censorship on an uncensored,
 comprehensive educational project.

 I have no
 problem with developing best practices, and certainly I don't think
 anyone will argue that we should host or retain porn or near-porn
 involving kids

 Certainly some people will argue this.  I believe that, fortunately,
 most of them are banned, though.

 Uh...wow. One would hope so. I don't believe that's very common,
 though. Certainly no one I've heard arguing against censorship is in
 favor of that.

 But a policy against porn or near-porn involving kids *is* censorship,
 is it not?


I suppose in the most technical sense it is, but that's a question of
very settled and tested law, unlike 2257. That's more like forbidding
copyvios--copyright law, while complex, is fairly stable and well
tested. In a very technical sense, forbidding penis vandalism is
censorship, but I think most of us know the difference. Putting a
picture of a penis on the article about a political candidate or
sports team is unacceptable, putting a picture of a penis on the
Penis article is much more likely to be done in good faith.

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-- 
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Todd Allen
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:55 AM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 12:28 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:18 AM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:01 AM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 4:46 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 6:03 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 {{sofixit}}, just like any area with NPOV/undue weight issues.

 The next day someone will fix it back. - Douglas Hofstadter

 Such is the nature of this project. If no one ever did anything
 because of that possibility, no one would ever do anything at all.

 Well, it's not just that it's possible, it's that I judge the
 probability to be very high.

 Then, if your proposed change is opposed by a significant number of
 people, it would tend to indicate it has not gained consensus.

 Heh.  Sorry, I have to laugh any time I hear a...person heavily versed
 in Wikipedia-speak...use the word consensus.

That's the way the project works. You or I can love it, or hate it, or
rail against it, but that's the reality. If you'd like to propose a
different mechanism, you can. But I think that the consensus
mechanism, for all its faults, has produced a very remarkable end
product.

Any system we use is going to be imperfect. Perhaps consensus is the
least imperfect one.


 That,
 too, is the nature of the beast, when working on a project like this.
 I think we've all had an idea we strongly believe to be right fail to
 gain the consensus that would be needed to implement it.

 Certainly.  And when this happens, sometimes we write about it, and
 then someone says so fix it, and we say the next day someone will
 fix it back.

 You seem to be making the assumption that Wikipedia's notion of
 consensus is the proper way to write an encyclopedia.  I by no means
 am accepting that assumption.

What would you propose as a superior mechanism, then? That's not a
rhetorical or sarcastic question-maybe we could do better. But you
haven't said how.

 But a policy against porn or near-porn involving kids *is* censorship,
 is it not?


 I suppose in the most technical sense it is, but that's a question of
 very settled and tested law, unlike 2257.

 So, the only reason kiddie porn isn't allowed (*) is that it's illegal?

 (*) Notwithstanding Virgin Killer, and perhaps a few other examples, anyway.

Child porn is illegal, that's been upheld by the Supreme Court
repeatedly, end of discussion. If 2257 were similarly upheld to apply
even in circumstances of educational/artistic work, I suppose we'd
similarly have to follow it like it or not, but it is untested in such
areas, and I suspect the SC would find it massively overbroad,
especially as it relates to subjects not identifiable at all.

But even in a hypothetical (and highly unlikely) world where child
porn was legal, a privacy issue exists there that does not exist in
adult nude or sexual images, since children are incapable of giving
real consent to participation in such a thing due to lack of maturity,
whereas adults can and often do give informed consent to participation
in photographed or filmed nudity or sexuality. I think that, too,
would allow us to draw a distinction between sexual images of children
and those of adults, since those of a child would be -by definition-
taken without the subject's genuine consent.

 In a very technical sense, forbidding penis vandalism is
 censorship, but I think most of us know the difference. Putting a
 picture of a penis on the article about a political candidate or
 sports team is unacceptable, putting a picture of a penis on the
 Penis article is much more likely to be done in good faith.

 What if it's a picture of the penis of the political candidate?

I can -conceive- of a case where that would be appropriate, such as if
the candidate were a member of a hypothetical Porn Party and freely
released such an image, and that release resulted in substantial
source coverage of that particular image.  In that case, we of course
should show it, since the article will have a section with reliably
sourced commentary on it. But since no such thing really exists, such
an image would be of little to no relevance to the article. In that
case, we're not disallowing it because it's a penis, we're disallowing
it because it's irrelevant. But if somehow it were extremely relevant
to the article, I'd see no problem including it. In every case I know
of, though, a candidate penis photo would be just as irrelevant as a
macro photo of a few hairs on the candidate's head.

 You seem to think there's a clear line to be drawn that everyone
 agrees upon.  But clearly there isn't.  Some people think the line
 should be drawn in one place, and some people think it should be drawn
 in another.

That goes back up to the above. When disagreement happens, we discuss
it and come to consensus, if we can. If no consensus can be reached
for an 

Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Anthony
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 1:20 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:55 AM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 Heh.  Sorry, I have to laugh any time I hear a...person heavily versed
 in Wikipedia-speak...use the word consensus.

 That's the way the project works. You or I can love it, or hate it, or
 rail against it, but that's the reality.

Sometimes I, and sometimes others, are going to write about the
results of it, okay?

 So, the only reason kiddie porn isn't allowed (*) is that it's illegal?

 Child porn is illegal, that's been upheld by the Supreme Court
 repeatedly, end of discussion.

Well, moreover, it's illegal almost everywhere.  So yeah, putting it
on Wikipedia wouldn't be pragmatic.

But I'm just wondering if there's a principled reason for the ban in
addition to the pragmatic one.

 But even in a hypothetical (and highly unlikely) world where child
 porn was legal, a privacy issue exists there that does not exist in
 adult nude or sexual images, since children are incapable of giving
 real consent to participation in such a thing due to lack of maturity,
 whereas adults can and often do give informed consent to participation
 in photographed or filmed nudity or sexuality. I think that, too,
 would allow us to draw a distinction between sexual images of children
 and those of adults, since those of a child would be -by definition-
 taken without the subject's genuine consent.

Many images on Wikipedia have been taken without the subject's genuine
consent.  So surely that isn't the issue.

 What if it's a picture of the penis of the political candidate?

 I can -conceive- of a case where that would be appropriate

So, commons is fine, I guess.

 In every case I know
 of, though, a candidate penis photo would be just as irrelevant as a
 macro photo of a few hairs on the candidate's head.

Convent pornography, cock and ball torture, and hogtie bondage,
though.  These are things that are relevant.

Or is it okay if, instead of putting the penis picture on [[Candidate
Whatever]], we put it in [[Candidate Whatever's Penis]]?

 You seem to think there's a clear line to be drawn that everyone
 agrees upon.  But clearly there isn't.  Some people think the line
 should be drawn in one place, and some people think it should be drawn
 in another.

 That goes back up to the above. When disagreement happens, we discuss
 it and come to consensus, if we can.

And what is consensus?

 If no consensus can be reached
 for an exception in a particular circumstance, standing policy (in
 this case, NOTCENSORED) serves as a fallback/baseline, and we go with
 that.

So, things are included (under NOTCENSORED), unless there is consensus
to not include it?

 Did you have another suggestion for a better process?

Yes, but first let me get a complete description of the current
process (starting with answers to the above questions).

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Andreas Kolbe

 Child porn is illegal, that's been upheld by the Supreme Court
 repeatedly, end of discussion. If 2257 were similarly upheld to apply
 even in circumstances of educational/artistic work, I suppose we'd
 similarly have to follow it like it or not, but it is untested in such
 areas, and I suspect the SC would find it massively overbroad,
 especially as it relates to subjects not identifiable at all.



2257 is also about child porn, because without age records there is often
no way of telling whether a cropped shot belongs to a minor or an adult,
and no way for the reader to tell whether they are looking at a picture or
video of a minor or not.

US-based adult sites use compliance statements for equivalent material.
They seem to be more responsible and law-abiding than the Wikimedia
community, which presents its material on a top-5 website.
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Yann Forget
2012/6/21 Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com:
 Incidentally, a Commons copyright specialist is currently being banned for

copyright specialist?
Is this supposed to be a joke? A 4th degree sargasm? An alien way of
defining a specialist? Or anything else?

Yann

(cut nonsense rethoric about the PK affair).

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Anthony
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 2:10 PM, Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 6:46 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:

 Many images on Wikipedia have been taken without the subject's genuine
 consent.  So surely that isn't the issue.

 Many are transferred to Commons from Flickr without the uploader's consent
 which, in the case of sexually explicit photos taken in a private location,
 should always be sought before doing the transfer.

Well, first of all, why?

Secondly, I'm not talking just about sexually explicit photos.
Wikipedia has photos of people being or about to be [[behead]]ed,
[[torture]]d, [[kidnap]]ped, [[assassination]]ed, etc.  I checked, and
there's no photograph of someone being [[rape]]d, just paintings, but
it's probably just a matter of time.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Anthony
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 2:22 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 Secondly, I'm not talking just about sexually explicit photos.
 Wikipedia has photos of people being or about to be [[behead]]ed,
 [[torture]]d, [[kidnap]]ped, [[assassination]]ed, etc.  I checked, and
 there's no photograph of someone being [[rape]]d, just paintings, but
 it's probably just a matter of time.

No photo on the [[child abuse]] article either.  Is this for pragmatic
reasons (no free photo available), or reasons of principle?

If someone added a photo of child abuse on the [[child abuse]]
article, and if it did not have any copyright issues, would it be kept
unless there was a consensus to delete it?

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Yann Forget
2012/6/21 Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com:
 Incidentally, a Commons copyright specialist is currently being banned for
 nominating admins' copyright violations for deletion, even though the vast
 majority of his deletions have always turned out to be correct ... the
 administrators are feeling harassed by having their copyright violations
 nominated and say he's doing it because he doesn't like them, and that it's
 bad for community relations.

 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Administrators%27_noticeboard/User_problems/Pieter_Kuiper

 You couldn't make this stuff up. Not unless you were William Golding, that
 is.

When it goes so far even remotely connected to the reality, I
understand that it gets difficult to reach an agreement about
practical and down-to-earth issues, like nudity images.

Yann

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Todd Allen
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 12:10 PM, Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 6:46 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:

 Many images on Wikipedia have been taken without the subject's genuine
 consent.  So surely that isn't the issue.



 Many are transferred to Commons from Flickr without the uploader's consent
 which, in the case of sexually explicit photos taken in a private location,
 should always be sought before doing the transfer.

 Unfortunately, that's another rule more honoured in the breach than in the
 observance on Commons. (Note that even if the image doesn't show a face,
 the Commons page always includes a link to the person's Flickr stream, thus
 identifying them.)

 Incidentally, a Commons copyright specialist is currently being banned for
 nominating admins' copyright violations for deletion, even though the vast
 majority of his deletions have always turned out to be correct ... the
 administrators are feeling harassed by having their copyright violations
 nominated and say he's doing it because he doesn't like them, and that it's
 bad for community relations.

 http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Administrators%27_noticeboard/User_problems/Pieter_Kuiper

 You couldn't make this stuff up. Not unless you were William Golding, that
 is.
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This thread isn't about copyvios, and I don't want to get too far
afield, but I think it does kind of show the thought process here
sometimes. From my read of the discussions with that editor, as well
as the incident discussion you linked, he is being blocked not for the
deletion nominations themselves, but for making them disruptively,
both by targeting editors he disagrees with and by being abusive
during the process. As a parallel on Wikipedia, if someone has a
disagreement with another editor, and proceeds to nominate 10 of their
articles for deletion with the deletion rationale Delete this crap by
that moron, that person could be sanctioned even if all 10 articles
really -do- need to be deleted. I don't know if that's really the
case, nor do I feel like reviewing his contributions in enough detail
to find out, but the block discussion is absolutely -not- talking
about what you said it was.

-- 
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Andreas Kolbe
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 7:22 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:


 Well, first of all, why?

 Secondly, I'm not talking just about sexually explicit photos.
 Wikipedia has photos of people being or about to be [[behead]]ed,
 [[torture]]d, [[kidnap]]ped, [[assassination]]ed, etc.  I checked, and
 there's no photograph of someone being [[rape]]d, just paintings, but
 it's probably just a matter of time.



Well, Todd has certainly said on-wiki in the past that he would not see a
problem in Wikipedia using a video of rape to illustrate an article on the
topic, provided it were appropriately licensed and did not raise privacy
concerns (for example if the persons shown were no longer alive). He and I
have discussed this at length before, together with Jimbo, but I don't
think either of us has been able to change the other's mind. :)

Many Wikipedians generally argue that because Wikipedia is not censored, it
should always be appropriate to show an image or video of what the article
is about. According to this reasoning, an ideal article about rape would
show a video of rape. An article on suicide would have embedded videos of
people killing themselves. An article on marriage would show a video of a
marriage's consummation. An article on fatal car accidents would show a
video of a fatal car crash one. An article on Russian roulette would show
someone playing it. And so forth.

This argument is not motivated by a desire to educate, or by educational
competence for that matter.
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Anthony
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 3:38 PM, Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com wrote:
 Well, Todd has certainly said on-wiki in the past that he would not see a
 problem in Wikipedia using a video of rape to illustrate an article on the
 topic, provided it were appropriately licensed and did not raise privacy
 concerns (for example if the persons shown were no longer alive).

So would the same argument would apply to child porn, if the child is
dead, and if it weren't illegal?

The current situation seems to be that photos of child abuse are legal
(and are allowed on Wikipedia), and photos of sexual abuse are legal
(and are allowed on Wikipedia), but photos of child sexual abuse are
illegal (and aren't on Wikipedia except for a few disputed cases).

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 21.06.2012 21:55, schrieb Andreas Kolbe:

On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 7:50 PM, Todd Allentoddmal...@gmail.com  wrote:


This thread isn't about copyvios, and I don't want to get too far
afield, but I think it does kind of show the thought process here
sometimes. From my read of the discussions with that editor, as well
as the incident discussion you linked, he is being blocked not for the
deletion nominations themselves, but for making them disruptively,
both by targeting editors he disagrees with and by being abusive
during the process. As a parallel on Wikipedia, if someone has a
disagreement with another editor, and proceeds to nominate 10 of their
articles for deletion with the deletion rationale Delete this crap by
that moron, that person could be sanctioned even if all 10 articles
really -do- need to be deleted. I don't know if that's really the
case, nor do I feel like reviewing his contributions in enough detail
to find out, but the block discussion is absolutely -not- talking
about what you said it was.



Notability is different from copyright. Copyright is fundamental. When
editors in Wikipedia have pointed out multiple copyright violations or
plagiarisms by administrators (we have had examples, up to and including
arbitrators), they have not been subject to threats, blocks and bans. I
don't think this sort of thing would fly in the English Wikipedia – not
with copyright violations.

Non-notable articles, perhaps, especially if the nomination were
accompanied by abuse. But I am honestly not aware of Pieter ever having
nominated a file with the reasoning Delete this crap by that moron. These
are your words. And I *am* aware of admins continuously picking on him and
ganging up on him. This is not the first time this situation has arisen.

If a file is a copyright violation, it is a copyright violation.

I don't tend to interfere with that issue. But from what i noticed you 
put Pieter in a very different light as i would put him. Knowing that 
you are unhappy with Commons, even dragging it down to a personal level, 
it isn't really surprising to me to read a comment like this.


I have to agree with Todds view that Pieter used deletion requests 
against opponents on Commons in a very unconvincing fashion, only 
hunting for pictures of this users. I also agree on the fact that a 
(un)justified deletion request is a separate issue from stalking 
opponents and making deletions requests purely to annoy them.



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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread David Gerard
On 21 June 2012 20:38, Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com wrote:

 Well, Todd has certainly said on-wiki in the past that he would not see a
 problem in Wikipedia using a video of rape to illustrate an article on the
 topic, provided it were appropriately licensed and did not raise privacy
 concerns (for example if the persons shown were no longer alive). He and I


You've already been caught once today making a highly distorted claim
in this thread, so if you're going to make a claim like this you
really need to supply the diffs.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 21.06.2012 22:24, schrieb Anthony:

On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 3:38 PM, Andreas Kolbejayen...@gmail.com  wrote:

Well, Todd has certainly said on-wiki in the past that he would not see a
problem in Wikipedia using a video of rape to illustrate an article on the
topic, provided it were appropriately licensed and did not raise privacy
concerns (for example if the persons shown were no longer alive).

So would the same argument would apply to child porn, if the child is
dead, and if it weren't illegal?

The current situation seems to be that photos of child abuse are legal
(and are allowed on Wikipedia), and photos of sexual abuse are legal
(and are allowed on Wikipedia), but photos of child sexual abuse are
illegal (and aren't on Wikipedia except for a few disputed cases).

Can you point me to any examples of real child abuse, sexual abuse 
or of child sexual abuse?


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Anthony
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 4:44 PM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:
 Can you point me to any examples of real child abuse, sexual abuse or of
 child sexual abuse?

On Wikipedia?  On Commons?  Anywhere?

For child sexual abuse, I was referring mainly to the Virgin Killer
image (and as I said, whether or not the image constitutes this is
disputed).

For child abuse, see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Erichsen_Abused_San_or_Nama_child_prisoners_p._52_v2.jpg

For sexual abuse, a simple search came up with
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:AG-10.jpg (which isn't on the
English Wikipedia except through image search, but is on other
language Wikipedias.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Todd Allen
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 1:38 PM, Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 7:22 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:


 Well, first of all, why?

 Secondly, I'm not talking just about sexually explicit photos.
 Wikipedia has photos of people being or about to be [[behead]]ed,
 [[torture]]d, [[kidnap]]ped, [[assassination]]ed, etc.  I checked, and
 there's no photograph of someone being [[rape]]d, just paintings, but
 it's probably just a matter of time.



 Well, Todd has certainly said on-wiki in the past that he would not see a
 problem in Wikipedia using a video of rape to illustrate an article on the
 topic, provided it were appropriately licensed and did not raise privacy
 concerns (for example if the persons shown were no longer alive). He and I
 have discussed this at length before, together with Jimbo, but I don't
 think either of us has been able to change the other's mind. :)

That was a highly theoretical scenario (and one you brought up for
that reason, as I recall.) But in practice, we do have photos of
victims at articles such as [[Rape of Nanking]] and [[Holocaust]].
Some of those photos are extremely disturbing. That's because the
articles are about extremely disturbing subjects.

 Many Wikipedians generally argue that because Wikipedia is not censored, it
 should always be appropriate to show an image or video of what the article
 is about. According to this reasoning, an ideal article about rape would
 show a video of rape.

It currently does. In this case, they're paintings rather than photos,
but they certainly and graphically show the subject matter at hand.

 An article on suicide would have embedded videos of
 people killing themselves.

For such a broad topic, I think we might want more general
illustrations. But if we really did have such an image, of appropriate
license and high quality, I could see considering it.

 An article on marriage would show a video of a
 marriage's consummation.

No, it wouldn't. The consummation of a marriage is tangentially
relevant. Photos of weddings and married couples in various cultures
would be much more relevant. The meaning of consummation should be
briefly touched on, but would not need anywhere near enough detail to
be an illustrated section.

 An article on fatal car accidents would show a
 video of a fatal car crash one.

[[Vehicle accident]] currently includes photos of the aftermath of
several car crashes, including a couple that look likely to have been
fatal. If we had appropriately licensed video of a vehicle accident
occurring, why on earth wouldn't we use it there?

 An article on Russian roulette would show
 someone playing it. And so forth.

Given that it's illegal in many areas, I would not hold out a high
likelihood of us seeing someone voluntarily release a video of it. But
let us presume that someone did. Isn't that exactly what the article
is about?

 This argument is not motivated by a desire to educate, or by educational
 competence for that matter.

Andreas, I realize we disagree on this in a lot of ways, but I think
anyone who works on this project has a desire to educate. I think we
can discuss this without questioning one another's motives or calling
people incompetent.


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Anthony
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 5:10 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 But in practice, we do have photos of
 victims at articles such as [[Rape of Nanking]] and [[Holocaust]].
 Some of those photos are extremely disturbing. That's because the
 articles are about extremely disturbing subjects.

So legal + no consensus to delete = keep.

Fortunately consensus doesn't mean consensus.  Unfortunately, it
means something closer to mob rule.

  An article on marriage would show a video of a
 marriage's consummation.

 No, it wouldn't. The consummation of a marriage is tangentially
 relevant. Photos of weddings and married couples in various cultures
 would be much more relevant. The meaning of consummation should be
 briefly touched on, but would not need anywhere near enough detail to
 be an illustrated section.

Why not?  The consummation of a marriage certainly deserves a section
in an adult version of an encyclopedia article on marriage.  I don't
think there should be a photograph of a consummation in Wikipedia, but
then I don't think there should be an photograph of a rape in
Wikipedia either, even in an adult version.  (For one thing, neither
illustration would do anything to enhance one's knowledge of the
topic.)

But what if some people want a photo and some don't?  No consensus,
so we leave the photo in, right?

 An article on Russian roulette would show
 someone playing it. And so forth.

 Given that it's illegal in many areas, I would not hold out a high
 likelihood of us seeing someone voluntarily release a video of it. But
 let us presume that someone did. Isn't that exactly what the article
 is about?

Yes, it's exactly what the article is about.

But the article being about something does not mean there should be a
video of it.

Again, I don't see what a video adds to ones understanding of the topic.

 This argument is not motivated by a desire to educate, or by educational
 competence for that matter.

 Andreas, I realize we disagree on this in a lot of ways, but I think
 anyone who works on this project has a desire to educate.

Well, no, not everyone who works on this project does.  But the
personal attack on you was inappropriate.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 21.06.2012 22:51, schrieb Anthony:

On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 4:44 PM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com  wrote:

Can you point me to any examples of real child abuse, sexual abuse or of
child sexual abuse?

On Wikipedia?  On Commons?  Anywhere?

Do i really need to answer this question, depending on where we discuss?


For child sexual abuse, I was referring mainly to the Virgin Killer
image (and as I said, whether or not the image constitutes this is
disputed).

You call the Virgin Killer image child sexual abuse? Truly?


For child abuse, see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Erichsen_Abused_San_or_Nama_child_prisoners_p._52_v2.jpg

I don't see any problem with this image. It documents child abuse as a 
fact without advocating it.



For sexual abuse, a simple search came up with
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:AG-10.jpg (which isn't on the
English Wikipedia except through image search, but is on other
language Wikipedias.

I would be truly shocked if that image or another version of it isn't used.

Are that examples of images you find shocking or that should not be 
shown on Wikipedia or hosted on Commons?




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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 22.06.2012 00:02, schrieb Anthony:

On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 5:48 PM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com  wrote:

Am 21.06.2012 22:51, schrieb Anthony:


On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 4:44 PM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.comwrote:

Can you point me to any examples of real child abuse, sexual abuse or
of
child sexual abuse?

On Wikipedia?  On Commons?  Anywhere?

Do i really need to answer this question, depending on where we discuss?

Well, I still don't know the answer.

Of course Wikimedia related...

For child sexual abuse, I was referring mainly to the Virgin Killer
image (and as I said, whether or not the image constitutes this is
disputed).

You call the Virgin Killer image child sexual abuse? Truly?

It depicts an instance of child sexual abuse, yes.
I see a child, but i don't see sexual abuse. So i can't agree with you 
that it is an instance for child sexual abuse.




Are that examples of images you find shocking or that should not be shown on
Wikipedia or hosted on Commons?

I was responding to your request to point you to examples.

I should have written this question: Can you point me to examples of any 
of the previously mentioned abuses on Commons or Wikipedia that have no 
justification to be there?




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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-21 Thread Andreas Kolbe
On Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 10:10 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:

 That was a highly theoretical scenario (and one you brought up for
 that reason, as I recall.) But in practice, we do have photos of
 victims at articles such as [[Rape of Nanking]] and [[Holocaust]].
 Some of those photos are extremely disturbing. That's because the
 articles are about extremely disturbing subjects.



Those photos are fine, and are found in reliable sources.



  Many Wikipedians generally argue that because Wikipedia is not censored,
 it
  should always be appropriate to show an image or video of what the
 article
  is about. According to this reasoning, an ideal article about rape would
  show a video of rape.

 It currently does. In this case, they're paintings rather than photos,
 but they certainly and graphically show the subject matter at hand.



They do not. They do not even show a disrobed male. They are a far cry from
the alternative we're discussing – and good job too.



  An article on suicide would have embedded videos of
  people killing themselves.

 For such a broad topic, I think we might want more general
 illustrations. But if we really did have such an image, of appropriate
 license and high quality, I could see considering it.



I know you could. :) Again, unprecedented in educational sources, and for
good reason. Try finding a publisher who will let you edit a book on
suicide for them with that editorial approach.



  An article on marriage would show a video of a
  marriage's consummation.

 No, it wouldn't. The consummation of a marriage is tangentially
 relevant. Photos of weddings and married couples in various cultures
 would be much more relevant. The meaning of consummation should be
 briefly touched on, but would not need anywhere near enough detail to
 be an illustrated section.



The consummation of a marriage is tangentially relevant? *Tangentially?*



  An article on fatal car accidents would show a
  video of a fatal car crash one.

 [[Vehicle accident]] currently includes photos of the aftermath of
 several car crashes, including a couple that look likely to have been
 fatal. If we had appropriately licensed video of a vehicle accident
 occurring, why on earth wouldn't we use it there?



A number of reasons, one of them reader psychology. A normal human being
would react with shock, concern and compassion for the people whose deaths
they just witnessed, and would probably be put out of the mood to read the
article. Websites put together by competent educators don't feature such
videos. I realise that what educational sources put together by qualified
experts do is irrelevant to the average unqualified Wikipedian.



  An article on Russian roulette would show
  someone playing it. And so forth.

 Given that it's illegal in many areas, I would not hold out a high
 likelihood of us seeing someone voluntarily release a video of it. But
 let us presume that someone did. Isn't that exactly what the article
 is about?



Sigh. I think this is roughly where we stopped two years ago. :)



  This argument is not motivated by a desire to educate, or by educational
  competence for that matter.

 Andreas, I realize we disagree on this in a lot of ways, but I think
 anyone who works on this project has a desire to educate. I think we
 can discuss this without questioning one another's motives or calling
 people incompetent.
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-20 Thread Anthony
On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 1:06 AM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 9:23 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 1:52 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 My middle one can very
 briefly go online alone to a few sites I've already agreed to, and I
 check up on her a lot.

 Is Wikipedia one of those few sites?

 Yes, actually, along with several other educational ones, some with
 children's games, her school website, etc. The chances that she would
 randomly stumble across a sexual image on Wikipedia are -vanishingly-
 slim,

Really?  How old are we talking about?

And what do you mean randomly stumble across?  I don't think it
would be random.  It would be one link leads to another, leads to
another, leads to another...

Also, how do you deal with the external links?  Do you have any type
of blocking software set up, or does your daughter recognize the
different shades of blue and know that she's not allowed to click on
the blues of a lighter shade without permission?

 and quite realistically, if it were to happen, I would much
 rather it occur in the context of a dispassionate article giving a
 frank but rather dry account of what it means, than a porn site with
 flashing banners and descriptions designed to shock, titillate, etc.

Wikipedia is better than a porn site.  But better than a porn site
doesn't mean it's necessarily a place I'd like my child to go to to
learn about a sexual topic.

 Her main interest is in dinosaurs, horses, and veterinary medicine,
 though-not exactly controversial sections of the project.

You've never gotten any of the tough questions?  The ones that I
claim, and you don't seem to deny, are not best answered by a
Wikipedia article.

 But the whole point is, that's -my- job, not anyone else's, just like
 it's my job to teach them how to drive, not everyone else's to get the
 hell off the road before they start to. Why are we figuring this to be
 any different?

 Well, surely it is different.  If you leave your keys in your car with
 the car running, and my ten year old hops in and takes it for a
 joyride, you don't think you're partially responsible for what
 happens?

 My ten year old kid isn't stupid enough to do that. If yours is, you
 failed long before they got in the driver's seat.

Well, I don't have a ten-year-old kid, let alone one that would hop
into a car and go for a joyride.  But hypothetically speaking, maybe
s/he has a mental disability which is not a failure of mine at all.

 So no, I wouldn't
 particularly feel responsible-if your kid is that immature and prone
 to rash behavior, you shouldn't have let them out of your sight.

Well, first of all, every parent has to, at some point, let their kid
out of their sight (if nothing else, at some point they have to
sleep).  So, the failure is not necessarily that of the parent.  It
could be the failure of the baby-sitter, or the failure of the school
bus driver, or the action of a kidnapper, or any of a number of other
possibilities.

But, in any case, my point is not that the current caregiver of the
child is not at fault.  My point is that the person who left their car
running, unattended, with the doors unlocked, in it is *also* at
fault.

The law would certainly agree with me on this.  I guess you would
disagree with this aspect of law?

 The question, really, is whether or not Wikipedia (or, at least, a
 cordoned off section of Wikipedia) wants to be one of those safe
 places.

 And like I said, and have seen with my own kids, the vast majority of
 it is. I would wager that a far higher percentage of Wikipedia is
 child-safe than the percentage of the Internet at large.

Well, yes, if you go by word count or article count.  If you go by
number of pageviews, I'm not so sure.  There are large portions of
Wikipedia which are perfectly safe for Wikipedia, and also completely
ignored by almost everyone.

 I have no
 problem recommending that my kids go read a Wikipedia article on
 something they're curious about, and then go look at the sources cited
 in it for more information.

So, you'd let them go on the Internet unsupervised.

 If someone wants to make a Kidopedia, with everything nuked out that
 they consider child-unfriendly, more power to them. They're welcome to
 host that wherever they like. They could even work at having the
 project in language aimed more at children, and perhaps making a point
 to cite children's education sources in articles in addition to
 newspapers, science journals, etc. This is free content, and someone's
 absolutely welcome to go and do that.

 But that's not -this- project, its aim is to be comprehensive.

What exactly do you mean by this project?  Are you talking about
Wikipedia, or about WMF in general?

WMF already does have a Kidopedia of sorts - Wikijunior.

 If you hire a babysitter, sure, it becomes their job-they accepted it
 as such. The same if you have family, etc., who help with your
 children, as well as 

Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-20 Thread Andreas Kolbe
On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 6:06 AM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:

 Yes, actually, along with several other educational ones, some with
 children's games, her school website, etc. The chances that she would
 randomly stumble across a sexual image on Wikipedia are -vanishingly-
 slim, ...


There is another aspect to this, which is that Wikipedia presently gives
undue weight to the weird, bizarre and even the completely made-up. To give
an example: every kid will look up the word fuck at some point in their
lives. Wikipedia offers, at the bottom of that article, the sexual slang
template

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Sexual_slang

with links to (partly illustrated) articles on a whole slew of weird and
obscure practices, while missing out many of the slang terms ordinary
people actually use in the bedroom. Basically, it's urban dictionary,
written for the lulz, rather than sex education.

Even the article on the humble gel bracelet

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gel_bracelet

contains more about a sexual urban legend than anything else, and it too
comes with a template offering helpful links to Wikipedia's bizarre world
of sex.

Larry recently illustrated another way in which kids can come across
Wikimedia's wealth of sexual media:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uE4Z9qunAc4

As Seth Finkelstein pointed out the other day, there is opposition to
pornography both from the right, on a family values basis, and from the
left, from feminists countering male bias. These are quite separate, but
equally valid concerns.

It's not for nothing for example that Anita Sarkeesian's article was
vandalised with porn. Male-fantasy porn expresses male dominance; in this
case, it was used to emphatically reassert that dominance, because
Sarkeesian had threatened it. It's as symbolic as the babe calendar on the
office wall: it signals that women don't have much to say in that office,
and can be greeted with cat calls or put-downs.

I am not against pornography per se. I just wish that if the projects have
it, they'd handle it responsibly, the way everybody else does quite
naturally. That means with respect for subject privacy, gender issues,
child protection issues, and so forth. Just be professional about it and
follow best practice.

Andreas
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-20 Thread Todd Allen
On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 1:57 PM, Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 6:06 AM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:

 Yes, actually, along with several other educational ones, some with
 children's games, her school website, etc. The chances that she would
 randomly stumble across a sexual image on Wikipedia are -vanishingly-
 slim, ...


 There is another aspect to this, which is that Wikipedia presently gives
 undue weight to the weird, bizarre and even the completely made-up. To give
 an example: every kid will look up the word fuck at some point in their
 lives. Wikipedia offers, at the bottom of that article, the sexual slang
 template

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Sexual_slang

 with links to (partly illustrated) articles on a whole slew of weird and
 obscure practices, while missing out many of the slang terms ordinary
 people actually use in the bedroom. Basically, it's urban dictionary,
 written for the lulz, rather than sex education.

{{sofixit}}, just like any area with NPOV/undue weight issues.


 Even the article on the humble gel bracelet

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gel_bracelet

 contains more about a sexual urban legend than anything else, and it too
 comes with a template offering helpful links to Wikipedia's bizarre world
 of sex.

It's well known for that. Like it or not, that's the aspect of them
that most sources write about. That's not in that case undue weight,
it's -due- weight.


 Larry recently illustrated another way in which kids can come across
 Wikimedia's wealth of sexual media:

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uE4Z9qunAc4

Good for him. Care to summarize his argument? I don't particularly
care to watch his video, or for him in general after the
OHNOESVIRGINKILLERIMAGE!!! hysteria a while back.


 As Seth Finkelstein pointed out the other day, there is opposition to
 pornography both from the right, on a family values basis, and from the
 left, from feminists countering male bias. These are quite separate, but
 equally valid concerns.

And like anything, we should catalog and report on the debate over the
issue in articles about it, accurately summarizing reliable sources
with due weight for each position, without as a project actually
taking a position ourselves.


 It's not for nothing for example that Anita Sarkeesian's article was
 vandalised with porn. Male-fantasy porn expresses male dominance; in this
 case, it was used to emphatically reassert that dominance, because
 Sarkeesian had threatened it. It's as symbolic as the babe calendar on the
 office wall: it signals that women don't have much to say in that office,
 and can be greeted with cat calls or put-downs.

Alright, so someone is both a vandal and a jerk. I'm not seeing the
relevance in that, to a discussion about having sexual images in
articles where they -are- germane and on topic. Could you please
clarify that?


 I am not against pornography per se. I just wish that if the projects have
 it, they'd handle it responsibly, the way everybody else does quite
 naturally. That means with respect for subject privacy, gender issues,
 child protection issues, and so forth. Just be professional about it and
 follow best practice.

You are, of course, starting from the presumption that the way you
want to do it -is- the responsible way, or what have you. I have no
problem with developing best practices, and certainly I don't think
anyone will argue that we should host or retain porn or near-porn
involving kids, but you want a very strict practice. A lot of us
disagree to that, and really don't want to treat such images
significantly differently from others, so long as they clearly involve
adults. I think we could also develop privacy best practices, such
that the subject of a photo must either be: a) Unidentifiable (or
rendered unidentifiable), b) Show clear awareness that they are being
photographed, or c) Give an explicit release. But I don't think c) is
necessary if a) or b) are satisfied.


 Andreas
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-20 Thread Anthony
On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 6:03 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 {{sofixit}}, just like any area with NPOV/undue weight issues.

The next day someone will fix it back. - Douglas Hofstadter

 Good for him. Care to summarize his argument? I don't particularly
 care to watch his video, or for him in general after the
 OHNOESVIRGINKILLERIMAGE!!! hysteria a while back.

Yeah, it's pretty bad.

 You are, of course, starting from the presumption that the way you
 want to do it -is- the responsible way, or what have you.

As opposed to what, assuming that the way we want to do it is the
irresponsible way?

If I thought the way I wanted to do something was irresponsible, I
wouldn't want to do it that way any more!

 I have no
 problem with developing best practices, and certainly I don't think
 anyone will argue that we should host or retain porn or near-porn
 involving kids

Certainly some people will argue this.  I believe that, fortunately,
most of them are banned, though.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-19 Thread Andreas Kolbe
On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 3:16 PM, Tobias Oelgarte 
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:

 Am 18.06.2012 15:06, schrieb Thomas Morton:
 I don't think that we need this argument since the filter can't replace
 parents anyway. But it is a constant part of the discussions with various
 exaggerated examples that can be seen in bold at Jimmys talk page even
 right at this moment. For example:

 Wikipedia helps me teach my children about the world in a safe, clean and
 trustworthy manner. Free from bias, banter, commercial interests and risky
 content.[1]

 [1] 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/**User_talk:Jimbo_Wales#UK_lawhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Jimbo_Wales#UK_law



The issue there is that on the one hand, the Foundation's fundraising
materials advertise Wikipedia as being God's gift for children, especially
underprivileged children, through official fundraiser stories like these*:

Wikipedia helps me teach my children about the world in a safe, clean and
trustworthy manner. Free from bias, banter, commercial interests and risky
content.

Wikipedia has been a wonderful recourse for my children and me to learn
new terms, knowledge, and culture background as an immigrant family. It is
a safe and trustworthy website for children to do their research.

Thanks to websites like 'Wikipedia', children of all ages can continue
their endeavor in learning.

We are a family that live in the interior of Brazil in a very poor state.
We have opened a learning center and work with local children from nearby
villages. Wikipedia is INVALUABLE for this work.

I worked for a non-profit in India and even the poorest children who were
receiving education there knew about Wikipedia and were familiar with the
site.

So that's one half of the story. The other half of the story is that the
community says the exact opposite: Wikipedia is not for children, but for
adults, and only a moron or a bad parent would let their children go on
Wikipedia unsupervised. Go figure.

Andreas

* http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Stories2/en
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-19 Thread Todd Allen
On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 11:22 AM, Andreas Kolbe jayen...@gmail.com wrote:
 On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 3:16 PM, Tobias Oelgarte 
 tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:

 Am 18.06.2012 15:06, schrieb Thomas Morton:
 I don't think that we need this argument since the filter can't replace
 parents anyway. But it is a constant part of the discussions with various
 exaggerated examples that can be seen in bold at Jimmys talk page even
 right at this moment. For example:

 Wikipedia helps me teach my children about the world in a safe, clean and
 trustworthy manner. Free from bias, banter, commercial interests and risky
 content.[1]

 [1] 
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/**User_talk:Jimbo_Wales#UK_lawhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Jimbo_Wales#UK_law



 The issue there is that on the one hand, the Foundation's fundraising
 materials advertise Wikipedia as being God's gift for children, especially
 underprivileged children, through official fundraiser stories like these*:

 Wikipedia helps me teach my children about the world in a safe, clean and
 trustworthy manner. Free from bias, banter, commercial interests and risky
 content.

 Wikipedia has been a wonderful recourse for my children and me to learn
 new terms, knowledge, and culture background as an immigrant family. It is
 a safe and trustworthy website for children to do their research.

 Thanks to websites like 'Wikipedia', children of all ages can continue
 their endeavor in learning.

 We are a family that live in the interior of Brazil in a very poor state.
 We have opened a learning center and work with local children from nearby
 villages. Wikipedia is INVALUABLE for this work.

 I worked for a non-profit in India and even the poorest children who were
 receiving education there knew about Wikipedia and were familiar with the
 site.

 So that's one half of the story. The other half of the story is that the
 community says the exact opposite: Wikipedia is not for children, but for
 adults, and only a moron or a bad parent would let their children go on
 Wikipedia unsupervised. Go figure.

 Andreas

 * http://wikimediafoundation.org/wiki/Stories2/en
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Only a moron or a bad parent would let their children go -on the
Internet-, unsupervised, Wikipedia or otherwise. Teaching your
children to use the Internet responsibly is no different than teaching
them to drive-at first, you have them watch you, then you let them
start taking the wheel with you watching closely, then as they gain
experience, maybe they can take short drives on quiet roads alone, and
then on from there. Throwing your kids on the Internet without giving
them any idea of what to expect is like handing them the keys when
they've never been on the road before.

My oldest kid is kind of in the intermediate stage right now-she can
use the Net, but I check in reasonably frequently. As she continues to
use it responsibly, the frequency of those checks will drop gradually,
until one day she knows how to properly and safely use it with no
supervision. My youngest is still at the stage where if she wants to
get online, I'm sitting right next to her. My middle one can very
briefly go online alone to a few sites I've already agreed to, and I
check up on her a lot.

But the whole point is, that's -my- job, not anyone else's, just like
it's my job to teach them how to drive, not everyone else's to get the
hell off the road before they start to. Why are we figuring this to be
any different? The world isn't always safe for children, and it is the
job of -parents- to keep children away from areas unsuitable for them,
and to alert them to the type of things they might encounter, not the
job of everyone else to make sure the whole earth is covered in safety
plastic and rubber bumpers.

-- 
Freedom is the right to say that 2+2=4. From this all else follows.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-19 Thread Anthony
On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 1:52 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 My middle one can very
 briefly go online alone to a few sites I've already agreed to, and I
 check up on her a lot.

Is Wikipedia one of those few sites?

 But the whole point is, that's -my- job, not anyone else's, just like
 it's my job to teach them how to drive, not everyone else's to get the
 hell off the road before they start to. Why are we figuring this to be
 any different?

Well, surely it is different.  If you leave your keys in your car with
the car running, and my ten year old hops in and takes it for a
joyride, you don't think you're partially responsible for what
happens?

 The world isn't always safe for children, and it is the
 job of -parents- to keep children away from areas unsuitable for them,
 and to alert them to the type of things they might encounter, not the
 job of everyone else to make sure the whole earth is covered in safety
 plastic and rubber bumpers.

The question, really, is whether or not Wikipedia (or, at least, a
cordoned off section of Wikipedia) wants to be one of those safe
places.

Personally, all I'm saying is that it would be nice if it did.  Some
others are saying that, if Wikipedia chooses not to be a place which
is safe for children, then Wikipedia shouldn't be marketed to children
- that the fundraisers shouldn't advertise Wikipedia as being a
project which benefits children.  And I think they have a good point.

And actually, I have to nit-pick and say that it isn't *only* my job
and not anyone else's.  It's also the job of others who have
*chosen* to help me with it.  I think that's an important point,
because the vast majority of us are *not* saying that Wikipedia *has
to* choose to facilitate the creation of an educational resource for
children.  We're saying you *should* choose to do so.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-19 Thread Todd Allen
On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 9:23 PM, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:
 On Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 1:52 PM, Todd Allen toddmal...@gmail.com wrote:
 My middle one can very
 briefly go online alone to a few sites I've already agreed to, and I
 check up on her a lot.

 Is Wikipedia one of those few sites?

Yes, actually, along with several other educational ones, some with
children's games, her school website, etc. The chances that she would
randomly stumble across a sexual image on Wikipedia are -vanishingly-
slim, and quite realistically, if it were to happen, I would much
rather it occur in the context of a dispassionate article giving a
frank but rather dry account of what it means, than a porn site with
flashing banners and descriptions designed to shock, titillate, etc.
Her main interest is in dinosaurs, horses, and veterinary medicine,
though-not exactly controversial sections of the project.

 But the whole point is, that's -my- job, not anyone else's, just like
 it's my job to teach them how to drive, not everyone else's to get the
 hell off the road before they start to. Why are we figuring this to be
 any different?

 Well, surely it is different.  If you leave your keys in your car with
 the car running, and my ten year old hops in and takes it for a
 joyride, you don't think you're partially responsible for what
 happens?


My ten year old kid isn't stupid enough to do that. If yours is, you
failed long before they got in the driver's seat. So no, I wouldn't
particularly feel responsible-if your kid is that immature and prone
to rash behavior, you shouldn't have let them out of your sight. If
mine did that, I would absolutely feel fully responsible for it-ten
years is plenty of time that she should know that's an extremely
dangerous thing to do.

 The world isn't always safe for children, and it is the
 job of -parents- to keep children away from areas unsuitable for them,
 and to alert them to the type of things they might encounter, not the
 job of everyone else to make sure the whole earth is covered in safety
 plastic and rubber bumpers.

 The question, really, is whether or not Wikipedia (or, at least, a
 cordoned off section of Wikipedia) wants to be one of those safe
 places.


And like I said, and have seen with my own kids, the vast majority of
it is. I would wager that a far higher percentage of Wikipedia is
child-safe than the percentage of the Internet at large. I have no
problem recommending that my kids go read a Wikipedia article on
something they're curious about, and then go look at the sources cited
in it for more information.

 Personally, all I'm saying is that it would be nice if it did.  Some
 others are saying that, if Wikipedia chooses not to be a place which
 is safe for children, then Wikipedia shouldn't be marketed to children
 - that the fundraisers shouldn't advertise Wikipedia as being a
 project which benefits children.  And I think they have a good point.

If someone wants to make a Kidopedia, with everything nuked out that
they consider child-unfriendly, more power to them. They're welcome to
host that wherever they like. They could even work at having the
project in language aimed more at children, and perhaps making a point
to cite children's education sources in articles in addition to
newspapers, science journals, etc. This is free content, and someone's
absolutely welcome to go and do that.

But that's not -this- project, its aim is to be comprehensive. The two
are mutually exclusive, because the real world is not always pleasant
or child-safe.

 And actually, I have to nit-pick and say that it isn't *only* my job
 and not anyone else's.  It's also the job of others who have
 *chosen* to help me with it.  I think that's an important point,
 because the vast majority of us are *not* saying that Wikipedia *has
 to* choose to facilitate the creation of an educational resource for
 children.  We're saying you *should* choose to do so.

If you hire a babysitter, sure, it becomes their job-they accepted it
as such. The same if you have family, etc., who help with your
children, as well as teachers and the like who voluntarily assume
responsibility for your child while in their care. That's fine. But
you shouldn't be able to force total strangers to accept the
responsibility of supervising your children because you can't be
bothered to do it, and you certainly shouldn't be able to insist that
public places be childproofed.

Now if someone wants to take on that Kidopedia project, hey-all they
need is a DB dump, a webhost, and the time to nuke out whatever they
don't want. Given our categorization system, the time part's probably
not even as onerous as it sounds at first. That's the whole point of
free content-anyone here yowling that there should be such a thing can
go make that thing, any day they want! If no one wants to do it,
despite the fact that they don't need anyone's consent at all to get
started on it right this minute, guess it's not that big a deal after
all, 

Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Tom Morris

On Monday, 18 June 2012 at 02:44, Tobias Oelgarte wrote:

 Every stupid bot could do this. There is no running out of the box
 solution at the moment, but the effort to set up something like this
 would be minimal compared to anything else.
 
 I would say that Citizendium failed because they did no automatic
 updating. What i have in mind is delayed mirror with update control. It
 is not meant to be edited by hand. It is a subset of the current content
 selected by the host (one or many users) of the page himself. It is
 essentially a whitelist for Wikipedia that only contains
 selected/checked content. That way a childrens Wiki could easily be
 created, by not including any unwanted content, while the effort stays
 minimal. (Not more effort then to create your own book from a list of
 already written articles)

{{sofixit}}


If all the people in favour of filters had spent their time building them 
rather than arguing about them, we would have had a wide array of different 
solutions, without any politics or drama.

That said, if people want to filter Wikipedia, a client-side solution rather 
than a filtered mirror is preferable. If a filtered mirror were to come into 
existence and become popular, this would mean that people would just filter all 
of main Wikipedia, which would prevent people from editing Wikipedia. A 
client-side solution means they are still looking at wikipedia.org just without 
naughty pics and doesn't interfere with editing. It also reduces the need for 
any servers. 

-- 
Tom Morris
http://tommorris.org/








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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread David Gerard
On 18 June 2012 08:00, Tom Morris t...@tommorris.org wrote:

 {{sofixit}}
 If all the people in favour of filters had spent their time building them 
 rather than arguing about them, we would have had a wide array of different 
 solutions, without any politics or drama.


The problem there is the insistence of filter proponents (from board
down) that it *has* to be done on the sites themselves, with any
post-site solution being considered unsuitable. Why is not clear to me
either.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 18.06.2012 09:21, schrieb David Gerard:

On 18 June 2012 08:00, Tom Morrist...@tommorris.org  wrote:


{{sofixit}}
If all the people in favour of filters had spent their time building them 
rather than arguing about them, we would have had a wide array of different 
solutions, without any politics or drama.


The problem there is the insistence of filter proponents (from board
down) that it *has* to be done on the sites themselves, with any
post-site solution being considered unsuitable. Why is not clear to me
either.


- d.
I guess Tom misunderstood my comment. I wrote down a simple plan how an 
external solution could work and how to minimize the effort to maintain 
it. If there is a community (it might overlap with our community) that 
would run such a filter portal (or even multiple portals) then it 
should be even more sufficient as if we would implement filters inside 
Wikipedia itself. They could really block images and make a child-save 
zone after their own definition, while we could continue as usual 
without having the burden to avoid conflicts.


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Thomas Morton
On 18 June 2012 12:39, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 On 18 June 2012 12:29, Tobias Oelgarte tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com
 wrote:

  I guess Tom misunderstood my comment. I wrote down a simple plan how an
  external solution could work and how to minimize the effort to maintain
 it.
  If there is a community (it might overlap with our community) that would
 run
  such a filter portal (or even multiple portals) then it should be even
  more sufficient as if we would implement filters inside Wikipedia itself.
  They could really block images and make a child-save zone after their own
  definition, while we could continue as usual without having the burden to
  avoid conflicts.


 The Board acted according to the Harris report, which just said to do
 it on the site itself:


 http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/2010_Wikimedia_Study_of_Controversial_Content:_Part_Two

 It's still not clear to me (looking over part two or part one) why it
 has to be on the site itself and no post-site solution is acceptable.
 Presumably someone interested can dredge through part one and pick out
 the sentences that back this position as opposed to post-site
 filtering.


Utility; hiding a filter on a lower order site does not make it useful.
Incorporating it into the main site (prefferably client side) makes it the
most accessible for our community.

Tom
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread David Gerard
On 18 June 2012 12:41, Thomas Morton morton.tho...@googlemail.com wrote:
 On 18 June 2012 12:39, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:


 The Board acted according to the Harris report, which just said to do
 it on the site itself:
 http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/2010_Wikimedia_Study_of_Controversial_Content:_Part_Two
 It's still not clear to me (looking over part two or part one) why it
 has to be on the site itself and no post-site solution is acceptable.
 Presumably someone interested can dredge through part one and pick out
 the sentences that back this position as opposed to post-site
 filtering.

 Utility; hiding a filter on a lower order site does not make it useful.
 Incorporating it into the main site (prefferably client side) makes it the
 most accessible for our community.


That's not from the Harris report. What was the justification in the report?


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Thomas Morton
On 18 June 2012 12:42, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 On 18 June 2012 12:41, Thomas Morton morton.tho...@googlemail.com wrote:
  On 18 June 2012 12:39, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:


  The Board acted according to the Harris report, which just said to do
  it on the site itself:
 
 http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/2010_Wikimedia_Study_of_Controversial_Content:_Part_Two
  It's still not clear to me (looking over part two or part one) why it
  has to be on the site itself and no post-site solution is acceptable.
  Presumably someone interested can dredge through part one and pick out
  the sentences that back this position as opposed to post-site
  filtering.

  Utility; hiding a filter on a lower order site does not make it useful.
  Incorporating it into the main site (prefferably client side) makes it
 the
  most accessible for our community.


 That's not from the Harris report. What was the justification in the
 report?


Because they were investigating solutions to problems *on* Wikipedia. Seems
rather obvious ;)

Or perhaps you didn't read parts in full, this for example:

For example, all of these sites, as WMF pages do, have internally-generated
 policies that determine what content is permitted on their sites at all.


Or

However, on every one of these sites, they also employ a series of
 user-controlled options (options designed by the site) that allow users to
 tailor their viewing experiences to their individual needs. Unique among
 these sites, at the moment, Wikimedia projects employ no such options.


I'm not sure where you are leading with this line of argument.. but it
seems to be down a black hole :)

Tom
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 18.06.2012 13:52, schrieb Thomas Morton:

On 18 June 2012 08:00, Tom Morrist...@tommorris.org  wrote:


On Monday, 18 June 2012 at 02:44, Tobias Oelgarte wrote:


Every stupid bot could do this. There is no running out of the box
solution at the moment, but the effort to set up something like this
would be minimal compared to anything else.

I would say that Citizendium failed because they did no automatic
updating. What i have in mind is delayed mirror with update control. It
is not meant to be edited by hand. It is a subset of the current content
selected by the host (one or many users) of the page himself. It is
essentially a whitelist for Wikipedia that only contains
selected/checked content. That way a childrens Wiki could easily be
created, by not including any unwanted content, while the effort stays
minimal. (Not more effort then to create your own book from a list of
already written articles)

{{sofixit}}


If all the people in favour of filters had spent their time building them
rather than arguing about them, we would have had a wide array of different
solutions, without any politics or drama.

That said, if people want to filter Wikipedia, a client-side solution
rather than a filtered mirror is preferable. If a filtered mirror were to
come into existence and become popular, this would mean that people would
just filter all of main Wikipedia, which would prevent people from editing
Wikipedia. A client-side solution means they are still looking at
wikipedia.org just without naughty pics and doesn't interfere with
editing. It also reduces the need for any servers.


The technical solution is a fairly trivial part of the problem; a
client-side filter could probably be put together in a few days IMO.

The *hard* problem is convincing the not censored abusers that it's a
useful feature for our community.

Tom

It is not convincing since it interferes with the work of our editors 
that aren't interested in such a feature. If we tag images inside the 
project itself then we impose our judgment onto it, while ignoring or 
separating it from the context it is used in. The first proposal 
(referendum) mentioned various tagging options/categories that would 
have to be maintained by the community, despite existing and huge 
backlogs. Additionally we are a multi culture project with quite 
different view points and which accepts different view points (main 
difference between Flickr and Co). The result will be huge amount of 
discussions about whether to tag an image or not. This leads me to the 
simple conclusion that it isn't worth the effort, especially if the 
filter is advertised to make Wikipedia a save place for children, while 
everyone (including children) can disable it at any time.


Separate projects that only focus on one task (providing a whitelisted 
view, an automatically updated subset of Wikipedia) would not be a 
burden for the community or at least for everyone not interested in or 
against filtering. Additionally it could define it's own strict rules 
and could even hide images and articles entirely depending on it's goal.


But i have to add that the WMF should not be part of this projects. This 
projects define their own rules like Flickr and Co.


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Thomas Morton


  It is not convincing since it interferes with the work of our editors
 that aren't interested in such a feature.


Seems unlikely. Although please feel to expand on this with specifics.


 If we tag images inside the project itself then we impose our judgment
 onto it, while ignoring or separating it from the context it is used in.


And yet you allow that we use editorial judgement in articles. This is no
different, it gives a further tool for editorial decisions to be made.



 The first proposal (referendum) mentioned various tagging
 options/categories that would have to be maintained by the community,
 despite existing and huge backlogs.


 A reasonable argument; but almost everything adds to our backlog anyway.

Additionally we are a multi culture project with quite different view
 points and which accepts different view points (main difference between
 Flickr and Co).


This is an argument for an opt-in filter.


 The result will be huge amount of discussions about whether to tag an
 image or not.


Not if well designed. And at the moment we have big discussions about
whether to include images or not.


 This leads me to the simple conclusion that it isn't worth the effort,
 especially if the filter is advertised to make Wikipedia a save place for
 children, while everyone (including children) can disable it at any time.


Think of the children is not really an argument I ascribe to. And not
really one other proponents of the filter, by my observation, ascribe to
either.

It mostly seems to be brought up by opponents to try and invalidate
arguments.


 Separate projects that only focus on one task (providing a whitelisted
 view, an automatically updated subset of Wikipedia) would not be a burden
 for the community or at least for everyone not interested in or against
 filtering. Additionally it could define it's own strict rules and could
 even hide images and articles entirely depending on it's goal.


Please note we define community in significantly different ways. My
community includes a minority, us, who edit and maintain the project. And
also the vast majority who merely read and use the project.

Our goal as maintainers for this main community should be:
* Maximise the ability of individuals to access content by...
* Minimising the road blocks (social, political, etc.) to accessing content

A significant portion of the filter discussion is predicated on our
internal prejudices and POV - basically navel gazing - with a wide
rejection of the idea that a multi-cultural society exists.

A non-WMF filtering project would not be useful to our community due to the
chicken/egg seeding problem.

Tom
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 18.06.2012 15:06, schrieb Thomas Morton:



  It is not convincing since it interferes with the work of our editors

that aren't interested in such a feature.


Seems unlikely. Although please feel to expand on this with specifics.
Any tagging by non neutral definitions would interfere with project. 
It's like to create categories named bad images, uninteresting 
topics or not for ethnic minority X.

If we tag images inside the project itself then we impose our judgment
onto it, while ignoring or separating it from the context it is used in.


And yet you allow that we use editorial judgement in articles. This is no
different, it gives a further tool for editorial decisions to be made.
Editorial judgment is based on how to wrap up a topic a nice way without 
making an own judgment about the topic. A hard job to do, but that is 
the goal.


If i would write the article pornography then i would have to think 
about what should be mentioned inside this article because it is 
important and which parts are not relevant enough or should be but in 
separate sections to elaborate them in further detail. This is entirely 
different to say pornography is good or evil or this pornographic 
practice is good or evil and thats why it should be mentioned or excluded.


There is a difference between the relevance of a topic and the attitude 
toward a topic. The whole image filter idea is based on the latter and 
not to be confused with editorial judgment.

The first proposal (referendum) mentioned various tagging
options/categories that would have to be maintained by the community,
despite existing and huge backlogs.


  A reasonable argument; but almost everything adds to our backlog anyway.
I would have nothing against additional work if i would see the 
benefits. But in this case i see some good points and i also see list of 
bad points. At best it might be a very tiny improvement which comes 
along with a huge load of additional work while other parts could be 
improved with little extra work and be a true improvement. If we had 
nothing better to do then i would say yes lets try it. But at the 
moment it is a plain No, other things have to come first.



Additionally we are a multi culture project with quite different view

points and which accepts different view points (main difference between
Flickr and Co).


This is an argument for an opt-in filter.
Don't confuse opt-in and opt-out if a filter is implemented on an 
external platform. There is no opt-in or opt-out for Wikipedia as long 
the WP isn't blocked and the filter is the only access to Wikipedia. 
contains some ironyWe have the long story that parents want their 
children to visit Wikipedia without coming across controversial content, 
which they apparently do everytime they search for something entirely 
unrelated./contains some irony In this case an opt-in (to view) filter 
makes actually sense. Otherwise it doesn't.

The result will be huge amount of discussions about whether to tag an
image or not.


Not if well designed. And at the moment we have big discussions about
whether to include images or not.
We have such discussions. But I'm afraid that most of them do not circle 
around the benefits of the image for the article, but the latter part 
that i mentioned above (editorial judgment vs attitude judgment).


Believe me or believe me not. If we introduce such tagging then the 
discussions will only be about personal attitude towards an image, 
ignoring the context, it's educational benefits entirely.

This leads me to the simple conclusion that it isn't worth the effort,
especially if the filter is advertised to make Wikipedia a save place for
children, while everyone (including children) can disable it at any time.


Think of the children is not really an argument I ascribe to. And not
really one other proponents of the filter, by my observation, ascribe to
either.

It mostly seems to be brought up by opponents to try and invalidate
arguments.
I don't think that we need this argument since the filter can't replace 
parents anyway. But it is a constant part of the discussions with 
various exaggerated examples that can be seen in bold at Jimmys talk 
page even right at this moment. For example:


Wikipedia helps me teach my children about the world in a safe, clean 
and trustworthy manner. Free from bias, banter, commercial interests and 
risky content.[1]


[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_talk:Jimbo_Wales#UK_law

Separate projects that only focus on one task (providing a whitelisted
view, an automatically updated subset of Wikipedia) would not be a burden
for the community or at least for everyone not interested in or against
filtering. Additionally it could define it's own strict rules and could
even hide images and articles entirely depending on it's goal.


Please note we define community in significantly different ways. My
community includes a minority, us, who edit and maintain the project. And
also the vast majority who merely read 

Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Thomas Morton
On 18 June 2012 15:16, Tobias Oelgarte tobias.oelga...@googlemail.comwrote:

 Am 18.06.2012 15:06, schrieb Thomas Morton:


   It is not convincing since it interferes with the work of our editors

 that aren't interested in such a feature.


 Seems unlikely. Although please feel to expand on this with specifics.

 Any tagging by non neutral definitions would interfere with project. It's
 like to create categories named bad images, uninteresting topics or
 not for ethnic minority X.


Of course; but that is predicated on a bad process design. Solution; design
an appropriate process.



  If we tag images inside the project itself then we impose our judgment
 onto it, while ignoring or separating it from the context it is used in.


 And yet you allow that we use editorial judgement in articles. This is no
 different, it gives a further tool for editorial decisions to be made.

 Editorial judgment is based on how to wrap up a topic a nice way without
 making an own judgment about the topic. A hard job to do, but that is the
 goal.

 If i would write the article pornography then i would have to think
 about what should be mentioned inside this article because it is important
 and which parts are not relevant enough or should be but in separate
 sections to elaborate them in further detail. This is entirely different to
 say pornography is good or evil or this pornographic practice is good or
 evil and thats why it should be mentioned or excluded.

 There is a difference between the relevance of a topic and the attitude
 toward a topic. The whole image filter idea is based on the latter and not
 to be confused with editorial judgment.


Pornography articles, as it stands, have a community-implemented filter
as it is. Which is the tradition that articles are illustrated with
graphics, not photographs. So the example is a poor one; because we already
have a poor man's filter :)

Similarly the decision does this image represent hardcore porn, softcore
porn, nudity or none of the above is an editorial one. Bad design process
would introduce POV issues - but we are plagued with them anyway. If
anything this gives us an opportunity to design and trial a process without
those issues (or at least minimising them).



  The first proposal (referendum) mentioned various tagging
 options/categories that would have to be maintained by the community,
 despite existing and huge backlogs.


  A reasonable argument; but almost everything adds to our backlog anyway.

 I would have nothing against additional work if i would see the benefits.
 But in this case i see some good points and i also see list of bad points.
 At best it might be a very tiny improvement which comes along with a huge
 load of additional work while other parts could be improved with little
 extra work and be a true improvement. If we had nothing better to do then i
 would say yes lets try it. But at the moment it is a plain No, other
 things have to come first.


  Additionally we are a multi culture project with quite different view

 points and which accepts different view points (main difference between
 Flickr and Co).


 This is an argument for an opt-in filter.

 Don't confuse opt-in and opt-out if a filter is implemented on an external
 platform. There is no opt-in or opt-out for Wikipedia as long the WP isn't
 blocked and the filter is the only access to Wikipedia. contains some
 ironyWe have the long story that parents want their children to visit
 Wikipedia without coming across controversial content, which they
 apparently do everytime they search for something entirely
 unrelated./contains some irony In this case an opt-in (to view) filter
 makes actually sense. Otherwise it doesn't.


We may be confusing opt in/out between us. The filter I would like to see
is optional to enable (and then stays enabled) and gives a robust method of
customising the level and type of filtering.



  The result will be huge amount of discussions about whether to tag an
 image or not.


 Not if well designed. And at the moment we have big discussions about
 whether to include images or not.

 We have such discussions. But I'm afraid that most of them do not circle
 around the benefits of the image for the article, but the latter part that
 i mentioned above (editorial judgment vs attitude judgment).


Filtering images would resolve most of these issues.



 Believe me or believe me not. If we introduce such tagging then the
 discussions will only be about personal attitude towards an image, ignoring
 the context, it's educational benefits entirely.


We successfully tag images as pornographic, apparently without drama,
already. So I find this scenario unlikely.



  This leads me to the simple conclusion that it isn't worth the effort,
 especially if the filter is advertised to make Wikipedia a save place for
 children, while everyone (including children) can disable it at any time.

  Think of the children is not really an argument I ascribe to. And not
 really 

Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread James Salsman
 If all the people in favour of filters had spent their time building them
 rather than arguing about them, we would have had a wide array of different
 solutions, without any politics or drama.

 That said, if people want to filter Wikipedia, a client-side solution
 rather than a filtered mirror is preferable

 The technical solution is a fairly trivial part of the problem; a
 client-side filter could probably be put together in a few days IMO.

 The *hard* problem is convincing the not censored abusers that it's a
 useful feature for our community.

I'm not so sure about that.  Submitting a patch to
http://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Extension:Bad_Image_List adding a user
preference to add one or more URLs with arbitrary media files to block
instead of using only the centralized list would not require the
approval of the community, just the developers.

Line 17 of 
http://svn.wikimedia.org/viewvc/mediawiki/trunk/extensions/BadImage/BadImage.class.php?revision=67467view=markup
performs image censorship in the centralized, top-down way that the
community already rejected, so a patch to add a distributed filter
list would actually be in line with community decisions.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Anthony
On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 9:25 AM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:
 Am 18.06.2012 14:49, schrieb Anthony:
 Have you ever tried to do this?  It's not as easy as you are making it
 sound, at least it wasn't as of a few years ago, because Mediawiki is
 tightly coupled to the specific database structure it uses.

 You don't need to interact with the database of Wikipedia itself. You can
 use the MediaWiki API which is quite stable and enough for this task. I
 don't speak about a complete mirror, i speak about a filtered _view_ for
 Wikipedia. You type in http://www.mysavewiki.com/Banana; and the server
 delivers the recently approved and cached version of the article from
 Wikipedia if Banana is whitelisted.

Are you talking about remote loading
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Mirrors_and_forks#Remote_loading)?
 That's a good way to get your IP address banned.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 19.06.2012 01:39, schrieb Anthony:

On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 9:25 AM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com  wrote:

Am 18.06.2012 14:49, schrieb Anthony:

Have you ever tried to do this?  It's not as easy as you are making it
sound, at least it wasn't as of a few years ago, because Mediawiki is
tightly coupled to the specific database structure it uses.

You don't need to interact with the database of Wikipedia itself. You can
use the MediaWiki API which is quite stable and enough for this task. I
don't speak about a complete mirror, i speak about a filtered _view_ for
Wikipedia. You type in http://www.mysavewiki.com/Banana; and the server
delivers the recently approved and cached version of the article from
Wikipedia if Banana is whitelisted.

Are you talking about remote loading
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Mirrors_and_forks#Remote_loading)?
  That's a good way to get your IP address banned.
No. I don't talk about remote loading. I talk about caching. The server 
hosts the current version itself and only fetches it for an manual 
update. To inform the host that a new version of page exists it could 
listen to the recent changes on the IRC channel. If it would do remote 
loading then you would also accept temporary vandalism which isn't 
desired like remote loading itself isn't desired.


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-18 Thread Anthony
On Mon, Jun 18, 2012 at 9:25 AM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:
 Am 18.06.2012 14:49, schrieb Anthony:
 And considering the heavy use of templates which are
 Wikipedia-specific, presumably you're going to allow for *some*
 hand-editing.

 That would be something else than i had in mind and would extend the
 functionality of the filter (the proposed one) by far. I intended flagged
 revisions together with white listing for a some kind of special audience,
 and not a fork like Wiki that modifies the content (partially) itself.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help
improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.
Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2007)

Are you going to include that template or not?  If so, where are you
going to link improve this article to?

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Federico Leva (Nemo)

Anthony, 17/06/2012 05:05:

I still would have been confused.  Still am, actually.  Did this
paragraph have a serious point at all?  I hope so, because Wikipedia's
porn problem is a serious issue.


The point was, I think, that no software is perfect (not even parents' 
brain) and that parents can't rely on software too much. Not that hard 
to understand, hence please avoid off-topic (see subject) paternalism.


Nemo

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Anthony
On Sun, Jun 17, 2012 at 3:11 AM, Federico Leva (Nemo)
nemow...@gmail.com wrote:
 Anthony, 17/06/2012 05:05:

 I still would have been confused.  Still am, actually.  Did this
 paragraph have a serious point at all?  I hope so, because Wikipedia's
 porn problem is a serious issue.

 The point was, I think, that no software is perfect (not even parents'
 brain) and that parents can't rely on software too much.

Is this supposed to be a parody of the people who point out the flaws
in software solutions but fail to point out the flaws in non-software
solutions?

Because, it seemed to me to be an instance of it.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread David Gerard
On 17 June 2012 13:21, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:

 No software is perfect.  No solution is perfect.  But don't let the
 perfect be the enemy of the good.


You're assuming that a good exists for this function. This
assumption is entirely unsubstantiated.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Anthony
On Sun, Jun 17, 2012 at 9:14 AM, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 On 17 June 2012 13:21, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:

 No software is perfect.  No solution is perfect.  But don't let the
 perfect be the enemy of the good.

 You're assuming that a good exists for this function. This
 assumption is entirely unsubstantiated.

YouTube's age restricted content policy is good.  That is to say,
it's not perfect, but it's a lot better than Wikipedia's policies.  My
kids are much more likely to run across hard core pornography while
clicking around on Wikipedia than clicking around on YouTube.
Personally I'd prefer they rely more on whitelisting than on
blacklisting - but what they do is already a *lot* better than
Wikipedia.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Andrew Gray
On 15 June 2012 13:21, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 I don't recall seeing any, but did anyone actually explain why the
 market had not provided a filtering solution for Wikipedia, if there's
 actually a demand for one?

I think we had this conversation almost a year ago ;-)

http://lists.wikimedia.org/pipermail/wikimedia-l/2011-September/114562.html
http://lists.wikimedia.org/pipermail/wikimedia-l/2011-September/114569.html
http://lists.wikimedia.org/pipermail/wikimedia-l/2011-September/115530.html

are my comments from the last round.

In short: the almost complete absence of anyone doing *anything*
clever in terms of reusing and repurposing our content strongly
suggests that there are practical barriers to doing so in general,
rather than the flaws with any specific model of what it is they want
to do.

(Alternatively, it might suggest there's no demand at all for any
meaningfully variant derivatives of Wikipedia, which is a demoralising
thought..)

-- 
- Andrew Gray
  andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread David Gerard
On 17 June 2012 14:50, Andrew Gray andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk wrote:

 In short: the almost complete absence of anyone doing *anything*
 clever in terms of reusing and repurposing our content strongly
 suggests that there are practical barriers to doing so in general,
 rather than the flaws with any specific model of what it is they want
 to do.


Which comes back to someone testing our practical forkability, then
(as I've noted before) - arguably an important part of backup hygiene,
but one which is in no way actually urgent at present.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Andrew Gray
On 17 June 2012 14:53, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 On 17 June 2012 14:50, Andrew Gray andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk wrote:

 In short: the almost complete absence of anyone doing *anything*
 clever in terms of reusing and repurposing our content strongly
 suggests that there are practical barriers to doing so in general,
 rather than the flaws with any specific model of what it is they want
 to do.

 Which comes back to someone testing our practical forkability, then
 (as I've noted before) - arguably an important part of backup hygiene,
 but one which is in no way actually urgent at present.

I certainly don't think it's urgent to try now - I'm sanguine that the
WMF WP we have now will be around for a second decade at least - but I
do think it's important to remember when bringing up the issue of
competitors.

As there are no major and well-used forks at all, we can't reasonably
draw inferences of the desirability of a specific project from its
non-existence - we simply don't have the information to make that
conclusion. This applies whether the hypothetical fork is one using an
image filter, one using stable versions, one using peer-review
editorial control, one dynamically switching between varieties of
English, or anything else...

-- 
- Andrew Gray
  andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread David Gerard
On 17 June 2012 15:43, Andrew Gray andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk wrote:

 As there are no major and well-used forks at all, we can't reasonably
 draw inferences of the desirability of a specific project from its
 non-existence - we simply don't have the information to make that
 conclusion. This applies whether the hypothetical fork is one using an
 image filter, one using stable versions, one using peer-review
 editorial control, one dynamically switching between varieties of
 English, or anything else...


I haven't seen those being shouted for like this is. That is, there
are people actually asking for this, and there aren't really for those
other things. So I think my question - if this is so obviously the
right thing, then where are the existing attempts? - still stands as
relevant.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread geni
On 17 June 2012 14:14, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 On 17 June 2012 13:21, Anthony wikim...@inbox.org wrote:

 No software is perfect.  No solution is perfect.  But don't let the
 perfect be the enemy of the good.


 You're assuming that a good exists for this function. This
 assumption is entirely unsubstantiated.


Well the various attempts by collages to block game sites were
somewhat effective. And that did have the effect of freeing up more
computers for actual college work.

-- 
geni

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 17.06.2012 17:16, schrieb Anthony:

On Sun, Jun 17, 2012 at 10:48 AM, David Gerarddger...@gmail.com  wrote:

So I think my question - if this is so obviously the
right thing, then where are the existing attempts? - still stands as
relevant.

The fact that it is the right thing isn't obvious, and forking of free
content is generally a last resort, when all else has failed.  Those
recent statements by board members that the filter is alive and well
make a fork less likely, not more.
It didn't even need to be complete fork. A whitelist copy would most 
likely already be sufficient for your needs. It would automatically 
update any article on a white list after a quick review (like sighted 
revision) or even entirely automated for articles or images marked as 
unproblematic. There would be some programming work (an confirm update 
button), but overall it would be easy to implement and maintain. That 
way you could easily create a Wiki suited for the needs of a special 
audience which is quickly updated and expanded to the latest versions. A 
subset of Wikipedia.



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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Federico Leva (Nemo)

Andrew Gray, 17/06/2012 15:50:

In short: the almost complete absence of anyone doing *anything*
clever in terms of reusing and repurposing our content strongly
suggests that there are practical barriers to doing so in general,
rather than the flaws with any specific model of what it is they want
to do.


A filtered mirror is not something clever and we have plenty of mirrors.

Nemo

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 17.06.2012 21:41, schrieb Federico Leva (Nemo):

Andrew Gray, 17/06/2012 15:50:

In short: the almost complete absence of anyone doing *anything*
clever in terms of reusing and repurposing our content strongly
suggests that there are practical barriers to doing so in general,
rather than the flaws with any specific model of what it is they want
to do.


A filtered mirror is not something clever and we have plenty of mirrors.

Nemo


May i ask why?

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Anthony
On Sun, Jun 17, 2012 at 1:04 PM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:
 It didn't even need to be complete fork. A whitelist copy would most likely
 already be sufficient for your needs. It would automatically update any
 article on a white list after a quick review (like sighted revision) or even
 entirely automated for articles or images marked as unproblematic. There
 would be some programming work (an confirm update button), but overall it
 would be easy to implement and maintain. That way you could easily create a
 Wiki suited for the needs of a special audience which is quickly updated and
 expanded to the latest versions. A subset of Wikipedia.

I don't see how that isn't a fork.  And I don't think it would be easy
to implement or to maintain.  Citizendium tried to do this without
even doing the automatic updating part, and they quickly decided that
it was more trouble than it was worth.

Maybe things have gotten better since then.  Maybe they have gotten
worse.  I don't know.  Is there even a way to export an article,
including (recursively) all the templates it depends on?

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-17 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 18.06.2012 00:40, schrieb Anthony:

On Sun, Jun 17, 2012 at 1:04 PM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com  wrote:

It didn't even need to be complete fork. A whitelist copy would most likely
already be sufficient for your needs. It would automatically update any
article on a white list after a quick review (like sighted revision) or even
entirely automated for articles or images marked as unproblematic. There
would be some programming work (an confirm update button), but overall it
would be easy to implement and maintain. That way you could easily create a
Wiki suited for the needs of a special audience which is quickly updated and
expanded to the latest versions. A subset of Wikipedia.

I don't see how that isn't a fork.  And I don't think it would be easy
to implement or to maintain.  Citizendium tried to do this without
even doing the automatic updating part, and they quickly decided that
it was more trouble than it was worth.

Maybe things have gotten better since then.  Maybe they have gotten
worse.  I don't know.  Is there even a way to export an article,
including (recursively) all the templates it depends on?
Every stupid bot could do this. There is no running out of the box 
solution at the moment, but the effort to set up something like this 
would be minimal compared to anything else.


I would say that Citizendium failed because they did no automatic 
updating. What i have in mind is delayed mirror with update control. It 
is not meant to be edited by hand. It is a subset of the current content 
selected by the host (one or many users) of the page himself. It is 
essentially a whitelist for Wikipedia that only contains 
selected/checked content. That way a childrens Wiki could easily be 
created, by not including any unwanted content, while the effort stays 
minimal. (Not more effort then to create your own book from a list of 
already written articles)



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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 15.06.2012 23:22, schrieb Andreas Kolbe:

On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 1:21 PM, David Gerarddger...@gmail.com  wrote:



I don't recall seeing any, but did anyone actually explain why the
market had not provided a filtering solution for Wikipedia, if there's
actually a demand for one?

(IIRC the various netnannies for workplaces don't filter Wikipedia, or
do so only by keyword, i.e. [[Scunthorpe problem]]-susceptible,
methods.)



UK schools of course filter, but both the bestiality video and everything
that comes up in a multimedia search for male human was accessible on
computers in my son's school. Much to their surprise. The one thing their
filter did catch was the masturbation videos category page in Commons.

That means they already found a solution to their problem that includes 
the whole web at once. As you might have noticed it isn't perfect. I 
guess that it could be easily improved over time. But the image filter 
had an different goal. It wouldn't help the schools, since the content 
is still accessible. But why we discuss about schools and children all 
the time and speak about it as a net nanny?


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Tom Morris
On Saturday, 16 June 2012 at 20:21, Tobias Oelgarte wrote:
 That means they already found a solution to their problem that includes
 the whole web at once. As you might have noticed it isn't perfect. I
 guess that it could be easily improved over time. But the image filter
 had an different goal. It wouldn't help the schools, since the content
 is still accessible. But why we discuss about schools and children all
 the time and speak about it as a net nanny?


Don't you get it? An image filter you can trivially opt-out of by clicking the 
big button labelled show image is a perfect way of preventing children from 
getting to naughty pictures…

Seriously though, I'm slightly surprised that commercial censorware providers 
haven't bothered to add the nudey stuff from Commons. Pay a few bored minimum 
wage people to go through and find all the categories with the naughty stuff 
and stick all those images in their filter. It'd only take a few hours, given 
the extensive work already done by the Commons community neatly sorting things 
into categories with names like Nude works including Muppets and Suggestive 
use of feathers etc.

It's almost as if the censorware manufacturers are selling products to people 
who don't know any better that are ineffective and serve to give piece-of-mind 
placebo to people in place of effective access control. Oh, wait, that would be 
the inner cynic speaking.  

--  
Tom Morris
http://tommorris.org/








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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 16.06.2012 23:36, schrieb Tom Morris:

On Saturday, 16 June 2012 at 20:21, Tobias Oelgarte wrote:

That means they already found a solution to their problem that includes
the whole web at once. As you might have noticed it isn't perfect. I
guess that it could be easily improved over time. But the image filter
had an different goal. It wouldn't help the schools, since the content
is still accessible. But why we discuss about schools and children all
the time and speak about it as a net nanny?


Don't you get it? An image filter you can trivially opt-out of by clicking the big button 
labelled show image is a perfect way of preventing children from getting to 
naughty pictures…

Is this irony? My comment included some irony as well. ;-)

How would a show image button protect children from getting to naughty 
pictures? The first thing a child would do is to press this button out 
of curiosity alone. Real child protection software is meant to hide such 
content without giving the child even the possibility to access such 
content. That is what a so called net nanny software will do, since it 
is usually meant to block access in case no parent is present and 
watching over their children exploring minefields. At least the adverts 
tell this great story.

Seriously though, I'm slightly surprised that commercial censorware providers haven't bothered to 
add the nudey stuff from Commons. Pay a few bored minimum wage people to go through and find all 
the categories with the naughty stuff and stick all those images in their filter. It'd only take a 
few hours, given the extensive work already done by the Commons community neatly sorting things 
into categories with names like Nude works including Muppets and Suggestive use 
of feathers etc.
Yes they could do that. But the Internet is large. They usually use a 
combination of black and white listing which is the core evil in the 
detail. White listing delivers perfect results (as long the content 
doesn't change over night), but it is much more expensive since every 
new page would need to be checked. Blacklisting is way easier, since it 
doesn't block access to new pages or images. But at the same time it has 
it's flaws, because any unknown website (the biggest part) can be 
accessed regardless of content.

It's almost as if the censorware manufacturers are selling products to people 
who don't know any better that are ineffective and serve to give piece-of-mind 
placebo to people in place of effective access control. Oh, wait, that would be 
the inner cynic speaking.
Exactly that is the case. I have never seen a censorware that works 
flawlessly (not even china can do this right). Either it allows to much 
(incomplete blacklist) or it is unnecessary limited (incomplete 
whitelist producing angry mob). Additionally it has to suite the view of 
the parents and match the age of the child. The only software which 
does this perfectly is the brain of the parents that tracks the actions 
of the child, stops them when necessary and gives useful advice (even 
better then Clippy).


nya~

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Tom Morris

On Saturday, 16 June 2012 at 23:51, Tobias Oelgarte wrote:

 Am 16.06.2012 23:36, schrieb Tom Morris:
  On Saturday, 16 June 2012 at 20:21, Tobias Oelgarte wrote:
   That means they already found a solution to their problem that includes
   the whole web at once. As you might have noticed it isn't perfect. I
   guess that it could be easily improved over time. But the image filter
   had an different goal. It wouldn't help the schools, since the content
   is still accessible. But why we discuss about schools and children all
   the time and speak about it as a net nanny?
   
   
   
   
  Don't you get it? An image filter you can trivially opt-out of by clicking 
  the big button labelled show image is a perfect way of preventing 
  children from getting to naughty pictures…
 Is this irony? My comment included some irony as well. ;-)


I should probably get a .uk domain name for my emails to remove any doubt as to 
whether I'm being ironic and/or dryly sarcastic.   

--  
Tom Morris
http://tommorris.org/



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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Anthony
On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 8:27 AM, Tom Morris t...@tommorris.org wrote:
 On Friday, 15 June 2012 at 13:21, David Gerard wrote:
 I don't recall seeing any, but did anyone actually explain why the
 market had not provided a filtering solution for Wikipedia, if there's
 actually a demand for one?

 Market failures do sometimes exist.

 Also, because as far as I can tell, the proposed filter isn't a NetNanny type 
 thing, it's a I don't want to see pictures of boobies AdBlock type thing. 
 Which is a different thing entirely.

 Of course, there's some confusion here. Larry Sanger, for instance, is very 
 very angry about how Wikipedia hasn't implemented a filter, even though he 
 seems slightly confused as to the difference between an AdBlock type filter 
 and a NetNanny type filter.

 Preventing people who don't want to see pictures of naked people from seeing 
 pictures of naked people is a lot easier a task than preventing people who DO 
 want to see pictures of naked people from doing so.

Preventing, sure.  But I think what you see as Sanger being confused
about the difference between an AdBlock type filter and a NetNanny
type filter is actually his desire for something which isn't either -
a filter which parents can set up to prevent their children from
inadvertently stumbling upon age-inappropriate materials.

As a parent I must say that there is certainly demand for this sort of
thing.  And I can think of many reasons why the market hasn't tackled
this one.  The copyleft license is near, if not at, the top of that
list.  Liability and other legal considerations would also be high up
on the list.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Anthony
 I have never seen a censorware that works
 flawlessly (not even china can do this right). Either it allows to much
 (incomplete blacklist) or it is unnecessary limited (incomplete whitelist
 producing angry mob). Additionally it has to suite the view of the parents
 and match the age of the child. The only software which does this
 perfectly is the brain of the parents that tracks the actions of the child,
 stops them when necessary and gives useful advice (even better then Clippy).

What parent tracks every action of their child?  You seem to have a
very unrealistic picture of how parenting works.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 17.06.2012 01:21, schrieb Anthony:

I have never seen a censorware that works
flawlessly (not even china can do this right). Either it allows to much
(incomplete blacklist) or it is unnecessary limited (incomplete whitelist
producing angry mob). Additionally it has to suite the view of the parents
and match the age of the child. The only software which does this
perfectly is the brain of the parents that tracks the actions of the child,
stops them when necessary and gives useful advice (even better then Clippy).

What parent tracks every action of their child?  You seem to have a
very unrealistic picture of how parenting works.
I guess i have to really wrap any comment inside the 
sarcasmironytakeItNotToSerious tag stack to avoid confusion...



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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Bjoern Hoehrmann
* Tobias Oelgarte wrote:
Am 17.06.2012 01:21, schrieb Anthony:
 I have never seen a censorware that works
 flawlessly (not even china can do this right). Either it allows to much
 (incomplete blacklist) or it is unnecessary limited (incomplete whitelist
 producing angry mob). Additionally it has to suite the view of the parents
 and match the age of the child. The only software which does this
 perfectly is the brain of the parents that tracks the actions of the child,
 stops them when necessary and gives useful advice (even better then Clippy).

 What parent tracks every action of their child?  You seem to have a
 very unrealistic picture of how parenting works.

I guess i have to really wrap any comment inside the 
sarcasmironytakeItNotToSerious tag stack to avoid confusion...

No, the Wikimedia Foundation should develop a personal sarcasm filter
for this mailing list so nobody is surprised or confused by what they
(don't) read here.
-- 
Björn Höhrmann · mailto:bjo...@hoehrmann.de · http://bjoern.hoehrmann.de
Am Badedeich 7 · Telefon: +49(0)160/4415681 · http://www.bjoernsworld.de
25899 Dagebüll · PGP Pub. KeyID: 0xA4357E78 · http://www.websitedev.de/ 

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-16 Thread Anthony
On Sat, Jun 16, 2012 at 9:48 PM, Tobias Oelgarte
tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:
 Am 17.06.2012 01:21, schrieb Anthony:

 I have never seen a censorware that works
 flawlessly (not even china can do this right). Either it allows to much
 (incomplete blacklist) or it is unnecessary limited (incomplete whitelist
 producing angry mob). Additionally it has to suite the view of the
 parents
 and match the age of the child. The only software which does this
 perfectly is the brain of the parents that tracks the actions of the
 child,
 stops them when necessary and gives useful advice (even better then
 Clippy).

 What parent tracks every action of their child?  You seem to have a
 very unrealistic picture of how parenting works.

 I guess i have to really wrap any comment inside the
 sarcasmironytakeItNotToSerious tag stack to avoid confusion...

I still would have been confused.  Still am, actually.  Did this
paragraph have a serious point at all?  I hope so, because Wikipedia's
porn problem is a serious issue.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-15 Thread Jussi-Ville Heiskanen
On Thu, Jun 14, 2012 at 11:40 PM, Risker risker...@gmail.com wrote:
 On 14 June 2012 16:19, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 On 14 June 2012 20:36, Andrew Gray andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk wrote:

  Least surprise is one way to try and get around this problem of not
  relying on the community's own judgement in all edge cases; I'm not
  sure it's the best one, but I'm not sure leaving it out is any better.


 The present usage (to mean you disagree with our editorial judgement
 therefore you must be a juvenile troll) is significantly worse.



 I'm not entirely certain that you've got the usage case correct, David.
 An example would be that one should not be surprised/astonished to see an
 image including nudity on the article [[World Naked Gardening Day]], but
 the same image would be surprising on the article [[Gardening]].

 The Commons parallel would be that an image depicting nude gardening would
 be appropriately categorized as [[Cat:Nude gardening]], but would be poorly
 categorized as [[Cat:Gardening]].  One expects to see a human and gardening
 but not nudity in the latter, and humans, gardening, *and* nudity in the
 former.

 Now, in fairness, we all know that trolling with images has been a regular
 occurrence on many projects for years, much of it very obviously trolling,
 but edge cases can be more difficult to determine.  Thus, the more neutral
 principle of least astonishment (would an average reader be surprised to
 see this image on this article?/in this category?) comes into play. I'd
 suggest that the principle of least astonishment is an effort to assume
 good faith.

 Risker


There is a serious issue here. least astonishment is very much
distinct from least offence. We don't guarantee the latter, and
never should.The former was hijacked by a silly board resolution, and
should be rescinded.


-- 
--
Jussi-Ville Heiskanen, ~ [[User:Cimon Avaro]]

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-15 Thread Tobias Oelgarte

Am 14.06.2012 19:31, schrieb geni:

On 14 June 2012 18:01, David Gerarddger...@gmail.com  wrote:

Yes, but this is called editorial judgement

No its called censorship. Or at least it will be called censorship by
enough people to make any debate not worth the effort.
It is called censorship right at that moment when useful illustrations 
are removed because of their shock value, while arguing with the the 
priciple of XYZ from a rather extreme position. Good editorial judgment 
would include such depictions if they further the understanding of a 
topic. But bad editorial judgment tends to exclude useful depictions and 
to include useless/unrelated, shocking or not, depictions.

rather than something that can be imposed by filtering.

True for wikipedia but commons in particular needs some way or another
to provide more focused search results.
I already made a workable suggestion for Commons, but the interest from 
any side was very low:


http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Requests_for_comment/improving_search#A_little_bit_of_intelligence

Some seam not like to give up the idea of filtering (labeling) and 
others seam not to care. Overall we have a proposal that would be 
workable, being to the benefit of all users and would not introduce any 
controversy or additional work, once implemented.

(Although the board and staff claim that
editorial judgement they disagree with must just be trolling is how
principle of least surprise becomes we need a filter system.)

Perhaps but I wasn't aware that their opinions were considered to be
of any significance at this point.

Okey they did block [[user:Beta_M]] but the fact that very much came
out of the blue shows how little consideration they are given these
days.


The fact remains that anyone who actually wants a filter could
probably put one together in the form of an Adblock plus filter list
within a few days. So far the only list I'm aware of is one I put
together to filter out images of Giant isopods.

I argued at some time that if there was a strong need for such a filter 
that there would already services in place that would filter the content 
or images. So far i have seen some very week approaches using the Google 
APIs, but no real filter lists. Judging from your approach to filter out 
Giant isopods, we see that there is no general rule what should be 
filtered. Some dislike X, others Y and the next one likes X and Y but 
not Z. Overall this results in the wish to have as many suitable filters 
as possible, which at the same time results in massive tagging work.


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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-15 Thread David Gerard
On 15 June 2012 13:15, Tobias Oelgarte tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com wrote:

 I argued at some time that if there was a strong need for such a filter that
 there would already services in place that would filter the content or
 images. So far i have seen some very week approaches using the Google APIs,
 but no real filter lists. Judging from your approach to filter out Giant
 isopods, we see that there is no general rule what should be filtered. Some
 dislike X, others Y and the next one likes X and Y but not Z. Overall this
 results in the wish to have as many suitable filters as possible, which at
 the same time results in massive tagging work.


I don't recall seeing any, but did anyone actually explain why the
market had not provided a filtering solution for Wikipedia, if there's
actually a demand for one?

(IIRC the various netnannies for workplaces don't filter Wikipedia, or
do so only by keyword, i.e. [[Scunthorpe problem]]-susceptible,
methods.)

I ask because of recent statements by board members that the filter is
alive and well, and not at all dead.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-15 Thread Tom Morris
On Friday, 15 June 2012 at 13:21, David Gerard wrote:
 I don't recall seeing any, but did anyone actually explain why the
 market had not provided a filtering solution for Wikipedia, if there's
 actually a demand for one?




Market failures do sometimes exist.

Also, because as far as I can tell, the proposed filter isn't a NetNanny type 
thing, it's a I don't want to see pictures of boobies AdBlock type thing. 
Which is a different thing entirely.

Of course, there's some confusion here. Larry Sanger, for instance, is very 
very angry about how Wikipedia hasn't implemented a filter, even though he 
seems slightly confused as to the difference between an AdBlock type filter and 
a NetNanny type filter.

Preventing people who don't want to see pictures of naked people from seeing 
pictures of naked people is a lot easier a task than preventing people who DO 
want to see pictures of naked people from doing so.

-- 
Tom Morris
http://tommorris.org/



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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-15 Thread Andreas Kolbe
On Fri, Jun 15, 2012 at 1:21 PM, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 On 15 June 2012 13:15, Tobias Oelgarte tobias.oelga...@googlemail.com
 wrote:

  I argued at some time that if there was a strong need for such a filter
 that
  there would already services in place that would filter the content or
  images. So far i have seen some very week approaches using the Google
 APIs,
  but no real filter lists. Judging from your approach to filter out Giant
  isopods, we see that there is no general rule what should be filtered.
 Some
  dislike X, others Y and the next one likes X and Y but not Z. Overall
 this
  results in the wish to have as many suitable filters as possible, which
 at
  the same time results in massive tagging work.


 I don't recall seeing any, but did anyone actually explain why the
 market had not provided a filtering solution for Wikipedia, if there's
 actually a demand for one?

 (IIRC the various netnannies for workplaces don't filter Wikipedia, or
 do so only by keyword, i.e. [[Scunthorpe problem]]-susceptible,
 methods.)



UK schools of course filter, but both the bestiality video and everything
that comes up in a multimedia search for male human was accessible on
computers in my son's school. Much to their surprise. The one thing their
filter did catch was the masturbation videos category page in Commons.


I ask because of recent statements by board members that the filter is
 alive and well, and not at all dead.



Which board members other than Jimbo have said that?
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread geni
On 13 June 2012 21:30, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 I was looking over old discussions, and wondered: who originally came
 up with the notion that the principle of least surprise should apply
 to educational content? If it existed before Wikimedia, who introduced
 it to the image filter discussion, on what rationale?


It (principle of least astonishment) derives from our redirect
guidelines where you are trying to decide between redirecting to an
article and redirecting to a disambiguation page. It also somewhat
related to page naming.

[Personally I think it's an inanity - an education that doesn't turn
your head upside down might as well be basket weaving - and it's too
easily applied to shocking and outrageous concepts that children
shouldn't be exposed to, like homosexuality or rights for minorities -
but I could of course be convinced I'm wrong.]

I think you miss the point of a concept. The idea is not that say
[[Marriage]] shouldn't contain information about homosexual marriages,
heterosexual marriages, marriages of convenience or polygamous
marriages but that it probably shouldn't contain photos of marriage
consummation.

[[Nude photography]] on the other hand should have some nudity. but
then it should also be more than 3 paragraphs long.


-- 
geni

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread David Gerard
On 14 June 2012 12:52, geni geni...@gmail.com wrote:

 I think you miss the point of a concept. The idea is not that say
 [[Marriage]] shouldn't contain information about homosexual marriages,
 heterosexual marriages, marriages of convenience or polygamous
 marriages but that it probably shouldn't contain photos of marriage
 consummation.


As I have noted already, this idealised version is not how it was used
when it was introduced to the discussion and is not how it's been used
in the most recent round of it.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread geni
On 14 June 2012 14:45, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 As I have noted already, this idealised version is not how it was used
 when it was introduced to the discussion and is not how it's been used
 in the most recent round of it.

Looking at the timing of the phrase appeared in the email list I think
you were physically present when the phrase stated being used in the
context of dealing controversial content. Certainly I can find it
being used in that context before that London meetup that Dory
Carr-Harris attended. And in that case at least the meaning was very
much in the direction of not including controversial content unless
there was a valid reason to do so. It was unrelated to an image
filter.

Shocking images in [[Nanking Massacre]] are pretty much expected.
[[People's Republic of China–Japan relations]] not so much. [[Agent
orange]] is a more boarderline case but these things are never easy as
[[Wikipedia:LAME#Names]] shows.

-- 
geni

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread geni
On 14 June 2012 18:01, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 Yes, but this is called editorial judgement

No its called censorship. Or at least it will be called censorship by
enough people to make any debate not worth the effort.

rather than something that can be imposed by filtering.

True for wikipedia but commons in particular needs some way or another
to provide more focused search results.

(Although the board and staff claim that
 editorial judgement they disagree with must just be trolling is how
 principle of least surprise becomes we need a filter system.)

Perhaps but I wasn't aware that their opinions were considered to be
of any significance at this point.

Okey they did block [[user:Beta_M]] but the fact that very much came
out of the blue shows how little consideration they are given these
days.


The fact remains that anyone who actually wants a filter could
probably put one together in the form of an Adblock plus filter list
within a few days. So far the only list I'm aware of is one I put
together to filter out images of Giant isopods.

-- 
geni

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread Todd Allen
On Thu, Jun 14, 2012 at 11:31 AM, geni geni...@gmail.com wrote:
 On 14 June 2012 18:01, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 Yes, but this is called editorial judgement

 No its called censorship. Or at least it will be called censorship by
 enough people to make any debate not worth the effort.

rather than something that can be imposed by filtering.

 True for wikipedia but commons in particular needs some way or another
 to provide more focused search results.

(Although the board and staff claim that
 editorial judgement they disagree with must just be trolling is how
 principle of least surprise becomes we need a filter system.)

 Perhaps but I wasn't aware that their opinions were considered to be
 of any significance at this point.

 Okey they did block [[user:Beta_M]] but the fact that very much came
 out of the blue shows how little consideration they are given these
 days.


 The fact remains that anyone who actually wants a filter could
 probably put one together in the form of an Adblock plus filter list
 within a few days. So far the only list I'm aware of is one I put
 together to filter out images of Giant isopods.

 --
 geni

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If Principle of least astonishment means what it normally means,
that being to make sensible UI decisions based upon what your average
user would expect to happen, I'm all for it.

If Principle of least astonishment means what it's been co-opted to
mean in this particular case, that people will somehow be astonished
to see images of nude humans on human anatomy articles, or depictions
of sex acts on articles about that particular act (though that's
already off kilter, we already fail to use real images on those,
instead preferring poor-quality line drawings), or images of Muhammad
on the Muhammad article, we need a cluebat rather than a filter. Point
those who scream in faux-outrage at finding media depicting
ejaculation on that article, or Muhammad on that article, to the
content disclaimer, tell them that yes, they will actually get an
article on what they specifically look for one for, that yes, we use
multimedia illustrations when we have appropriately licensed and
relevant media, and move on.

Todd Allen

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread Andrew Gray
On 14 June 2012 18:01, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 On 14 June 2012 17:22, geni geni...@gmail.com wrote:

 Shocking images in [[Nanking Massacre]] are pretty much expected.
 [[People's Republic of China–Japan relations]] not so much. [[Agent
 orange]] is a more boarderline case but these things are never easy as
 [[Wikipedia:LAME#Names]] shows.

 Yes, but this is called editorial judgement rather than something that
 can be imposed by filtering. (Although the board and staff claim that

This falls into the trap of presuming there is one approach of
editorial judgement of acceptability that is common to all readers,
*and* that it's the same as the editorial judgement currently provided
by our community of editors.

I'm not confident that a) is a reliable assumption - neutrality is a
matter of presenting all sides, and so we can achieve it, while this
sort of editorial judgement is basically binary and so much harder to
equivocate. Even if it is, b) certainly has problems - while our
community strives to be neutral, I doubt anyone would claim it does
not start off with fairly heavy biases, from demography as much as
anything else.

Least surprise is one way to try and get around this problem of not
relying on the community's own judgement in all edge cases; I'm not
sure it's the best one, but I'm not sure leaving it out is any better.

-- 
- Andrew Gray
  andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread David Gerard
On 14 June 2012 20:36, Andrew Gray andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk wrote:

 Least surprise is one way to try and get around this problem of not
 relying on the community's own judgement in all edge cases; I'm not
 sure it's the best one, but I'm not sure leaving it out is any better.


The present usage (to mean you disagree with our editorial judgement
therefore you must be a juvenile troll) is significantly worse.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-14 Thread Risker
On 14 June 2012 16:19, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 On 14 June 2012 20:36, Andrew Gray andrew.g...@dunelm.org.uk wrote:

  Least surprise is one way to try and get around this problem of not
  relying on the community's own judgement in all edge cases; I'm not
  sure it's the best one, but I'm not sure leaving it out is any better.


 The present usage (to mean you disagree with our editorial judgement
 therefore you must be a juvenile troll) is significantly worse.



I'm not entirely certain that you've got the usage case correct, David.
An example would be that one should not be surprised/astonished to see an
image including nudity on the article [[World Naked Gardening Day]], but
the same image would be surprising on the article [[Gardening]].

The Commons parallel would be that an image depicting nude gardening would
be appropriately categorized as [[Cat:Nude gardening]], but would be poorly
categorized as [[Cat:Gardening]].  One expects to see a human and gardening
but not nudity in the latter, and humans, gardening, *and* nudity in the
former.

Now, in fairness, we all know that trolling with images has been a regular
occurrence on many projects for years, much of it very obviously trolling,
but edge cases can be more difficult to determine.  Thus, the more neutral
principle of least astonishment (would an average reader be surprised to
see this image on this article?/in this category?) comes into play. I'd
suggest that the principle of least astonishment is an effort to assume
good faith.

Risker
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread Richard Symonds
Not sure, but I think it's the principle of least /astonishment/ - which
may be an important difference...

Richard Symonds
Wikimedia UK
0207 065 0992
Disclaimer viewable at
http://uk.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimedia:Email_disclaimer
Visit http://www.wikimedia.org.uk/ and @wikimediauk



On 13 June 2012 21:30, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 I was looking over old discussions, and wondered: who originally came
 up with the notion that the principle of least surprise should apply
 to educational content? If it existed before Wikimedia, who introduced
 it to the image filter discussion, on what rationale?

 [Personally I think it's an inanity - an education that doesn't turn
 your head upside down might as well be basket weaving - and it's too
 easily applied to shocking and outrageous concepts that children
 shouldn't be exposed to, like homosexuality or rights for minorities -
 but I could of course be convinced I'm wrong.]


 - d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread David Gerard
On 13 June 2012 21:32, Richard Symonds richard.symo...@wikimedia.org.uk wrote:

 Not sure, but I think it's the principle of least /astonishment/ - which
 may be an important difference...


Pretty sure it doesn't for educational purposes. I think my objection
stands in its entirety.

(I note that in interface design, principle of least astonishment is
in opposition to educating the user. With educational materials,
that is ahahaha indeed the point.)


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread David Gerard
On 13 June 2012 21:44, Michael Peel michael.p...@wikimedia.org.uk wrote:

 My understanding of this line of argument was that images would be displayed 
 where you would expect them to be displayed (e.g. the article on penis or 
 vagina would naturally include a picture of a penis or vagina),


I don't recall this being conceded. (The discussions of image filter
plans seemed to me to assume that images considered unsuitable would
indeed be filtered in such places.)

So who first brought the phrase into the discussion?


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread Nathan
Earliest I have it on a Wikimedia list is from WikiEn-L on 2/11/08 from Ian
Woollard (written as principle of least surprise), in the context of a
Muhammad images thread started by Jimbo -- but my logs only go back to the
summer of 07.

On-wiki, I see it being used in naming convention arguments for years, as
early as April 2005. I'm not sure when it made the transition from user
interface design principle to a more general content principle, but it
looks like (from a web search) it was commonly used for Ruby as early as
2002-2003.
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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread David Gerard
On 13 June 2012 21:56, Nathan nawr...@gmail.com wrote:

 Earliest I have it on a Wikimedia list is from WikiEn-L on 2/11/08 from Ian
 Woollard (written as principle of least surprise), in the context of a
 Muhammad images thread started by Jimbo -- but my logs only go back to the
 summer of 07.


Bingo - and he specifically invoked it to minimise offence.


 On-wiki, I see it being used in naming convention arguments for years, as
 early as April 2005.


Yeah, that's arguably a user interface issue (with arguments being
somewhat alleviated by a forest of redirects). I see it's been
commonly used around user interface issues in Wikimedia for many
years.


- d.

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread phoebe ayers
On Wed, Jun 13, 2012 at 1:44 PM, Michael Peel
michael.p...@wikimedia.org.uk wrote:
 My understanding of this line of argument was that images would be displayed 
 where you would expect them to be displayed (e.g. the article on penis or 
 vagina would naturally include a picture of a penis or vagina), but wouldn't 
 be immediately displayed where you wouldn't expect them (e.g. if you want to 
 find information on necklaces made of pearls).

 Whether that is called 'principle of least surprise' or 'principle of least 
 astonishment' or something else is semantics...

 Thanks,
 Mike

That's exactly how I understand the idea as well.

As for where it came from -- from my imperfect memory, the idea has
been kicking around in the English Wikipedia style guide and in
Commons for some years (I found it in a style guide history in 2004,
also cf Nathan's research).

In the context of this discussion, however, the principle of least
astonishment had I believe been brought up early on; it was
highlighted in the Harris report as a potentially useful concept for
thinking about the whole range of issues around handling controversial
content. This was actually a separate bullet point/idea from the
recommendation to allow readers to hide images. They're not
necessarily connected; overall I haven't heard a lot of complaints
about trying to implement the principle of least astonishment, i.e. by
improving search etc.

The concept itself, as a usability term, has been around for a while;
there's a (not very good) article, which was started in 2002:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principle_of_least_astonishment
 I don't know when it came into use in the world at large.

-- phoebe

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread FT2
I can't say who came up with it.  The point I first became aware of it was
the posts, and consultation reports series, on Meta.  It may well have
predated that though, in which case I couldn't say.

Advanced search in old enwp and meta dumps, or mailing lists would be a way
to explore before that.  The topic was only discussed _in depth_ in a
limited number of places easily identified by search, the expressions are
very distinctive, and a list of wiki pages or list threads can be searched
fairly easily to find exact posts or dates.

FT2


On Wed, Jun 13, 2012 at 9:30 PM, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:

 I was looking over old discussions, and wondered: who originally came
 up with the notion that the principle of least surprise should apply
 to educational content? If it existed before Wikimedia, who introduced
 it to the image filter discussion, on what rationale?

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread Federico Leva (Nemo)

David Gerard, 13/06/2012 23:02:

On-wiki, I see it being used in naming convention arguments for years, as
early as April 2005.



Yeah, that's arguably a user interface issue (with arguments being
somewhat alleviated by a forest of redirects). I see it's been
commonly used around user interface issues in Wikimedia for many
years.


And still you had reactions like this: 
http://lists.wikimedia.org/pipermail/wikien-l/2006-April/044011.html 
(notice the other big threads in the same month about images...).


Nemo

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread Tom Morris
On 13 June 2012 22:02, David Gerard dger...@gmail.com wrote:
 On 13 June 2012 21:56, Nathan nawr...@gmail.com wrote:

 Earliest I have it on a Wikimedia list is from WikiEn-L on 2/11/08 from Ian
 Woollard (written as principle of least surprise), in the context of a
 Muhammad images thread started by Jimbo -- but my logs only go back to the
 summer of 07.


 Bingo - and he specifically invoked it to minimise offence.


Sure, but it also applies to getting back what you expect.

A male heterosexual friend of mine typed in the word Boobs into
Commons search engine a while back and came back with the page Boobs
on Bikes. It's not a matter of minimising offence, it's simply that
if you type in one thing and get something else and rather surprising,
that's a problem.

That a subset of that surprise happens to be involve people getting
offended doesn't mean that avoiding unnecessary surprise isn't a
laudable goal.

There's surprise in the reading a book and learning something new
sense, then there is surprise in the being told that the book is on
this shelf, but instead it's on a different shelf sense. The two are
rather different, and I fear some conflation is going on.

-- 
Tom Morris
http://tommorris.org/

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Re: [Wikimedia-l] Who invoked principle of least surprise for the image filter?

2012-06-13 Thread Bjoern Hoehrmann
* Michael Peel wrote:
My understanding of this line of argument was that images would be
displayed where you would expect them to be displayed (e.g. the article
on penis or vagina would naturally include a picture of a penis or
vagina), but wouldn't be immediately displayed where you wouldn't expect
them (e.g. if you want to find information on necklaces made of pearls).

Did anyone argue for displaying images where they would not expect them?
-- 
Björn Höhrmann · mailto:bjo...@hoehrmann.de · http://bjoern.hoehrmann.de
Am Badedeich 7 · Telefon: +49(0)160/4415681 · http://www.bjoernsworld.de
25899 Dagebüll · PGP Pub. KeyID: 0xA4357E78 · http://www.websitedev.de/ 

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