Can anyone explain this ?

2013-04-14 Thread Roger Clough
One of the great mysteries of liberalism is the contradiction in its political stance concerning rich corporations. On the one hand, it rejects the attempts of conservatives to lower corporate taxes. But on the other hand, it will bail out rich corporations such as General Motors to prevent their

Re: Why do particles decay randomly?

2013-04-14 Thread Telmo Menezes
On Sun, Apr 14, 2013 at 12:52 AM, meekerdb meeke...@verizon.net wrote: On 4/13/2013 2:40 PM, Telmo Menezes wrote: Unless we question causality itself. Which we should. This is why Science is not the only way to pursue knowledge and Philosophy is necessary. Causality isn't even an important

Re: Can anyone explain this ?

2013-04-14 Thread Richard Ruquist
Roger, Most corporations do not pay any taxes at all On Sun, Apr 14, 2013 at 7:56 AM, Roger Clough rclo...@verizon.net wrote: One of the great mysteries of liberalism is the contradiction in its political stance concerning rich corporations. On the one hand, it rejects the attempts of

Re: Can anyone explain this ?

2013-04-14 Thread Craig Weinberg
On Sunday, April 14, 2013 7:56:35 AM UTC-4, Roger Clough wrote: One of the great mysteries of liberalism is the contradiction in its political stance concerning rich corporations. On the one hand, it rejects the attempts of conservatives to lower corporate taxes. Liberals see that

Re: Losing Control

2013-04-14 Thread Bruno Marchal
On 13 Apr 2013, at 15:13, Richard Ruquist wrote: Bruno, Could you explain by example how comp could be verified.? This is more or less planned for the FOAR list. In a nutshell, using some image, comp says that the big truth (about consciousness and matter) is in your head. With you = any

Re: Why do particles decay randomly?

2013-04-14 Thread Bruno Marchal
On 13 Apr 2013, at 15:17, Richard Ruquist wrote: But Bruno, because of the measure problem, MWI must also be probabilistic, otherwise it does not agree with experiment. The universal wave evolves deterministically, but *we* are in the superposed and differentiating branches, so we feel

Re: Why do particles decay randomly?

2013-04-14 Thread Bruno Marchal
On 13 Apr 2013, at 15:18, Richard Ruquist wrote: Is 10^122 or 10^1000 large enough? Richard I think that 10^1000 is large enough to make the Ramanujan limited sum (limited to 10^1000) as large as (1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + ... + 10^1000). I'm afraid that to get the -1/12, you need to go

Re: Why do particles decay randomly?

2013-04-14 Thread Bruno Marchal
On 13 Apr 2013, at 15:21, Richard Ruquist wrote: I have tried to study the UDA but lack sufficient understanding to see how the UDA could compute an infinite number of paths or universes as in the diffraction example I discussed. I will remind this in later explanations. Dovetailing is a

Re: Why do particles decay randomly?

2013-04-14 Thread Stephen Paul King
Hi Bruno, Unless we can explain how the *some first person plural indeterminacy* obtains, it does not give a satisfactory explanation of 'shared experience'. It seems to me that you are right, in so far as, the necessity of such, but I argue that that alone is insufficient. You might want

Reliability of neuroscience research questioned

2013-04-14 Thread Craig Weinberg
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2013/9282.html New research has questioned the reliability of neuroscience studies, saying that conclusions could be misleading due to small sample sizes. A team led by academics from the University of Bristol reviewed 48 articles on neuroscience meta-analysis

Re: The world is in the brain

2013-04-14 Thread Bruno Marchal
On 14 Apr 2013, at 00:05, Craig Weinberg wrote: On Saturday, April 13, 2013 6:47:47 AM UTC-4, Bruno Marchal wrote: On 11 Apr 2013, at 21:18, Craig Weinberg wrote: With comp, matter relies on the numbers law, or Turing equivalent. Matter also relies on geometry, which comp cannot provide.

Re: Scientific journals

2013-04-14 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Apr 13, 2013 at 7:24 PM, Craig Weinberg whatsons...@gmail.comwrote: Astrology is interesting to me because if there were nothing to it than the charts of important figures and events in history, and members of families would show no meaningful patterns beyond what is expected by

Re: Scientific journals

2013-04-14 Thread Bruno Marchal
On 14 Apr 2013, at 01:24, Craig Weinberg wrote: On Saturday, April 13, 2013 7:47:51 AM UTC-4, Bruno Marchal wrote: On 12 Apr 2013, at 20:09, John Clark wrote: On Fri, Apr 12, 2013 Bruno Marchal mar...@ulb.ac.be wrote: There is nothing in numerology or astrology which is even remotely

Re: Why do particles decay randomly?

2013-04-14 Thread meekerdb
On 4/14/2013 6:37 AM, Telmo Menezes wrote: On Sun, Apr 14, 2013 at 12:52 AM, meekerdb meeke...@verizon.net wrote: On 4/13/2013 2:40 PM, Telmo Menezes wrote: ... What knowledge do you think has come from philosophy? You are aware that by asking this question you are already doing philosophy?

Re: Scientific journals

2013-04-14 Thread Craig Weinberg
On Sunday, April 14, 2013 1:39:06 PM UTC-4, John Clark wrote: On Sat, Apr 13, 2013 at 7:24 PM, Craig Weinberg whats...@gmail.comjavascript: wrote: Astrology is interesting to me because if there were nothing to it than the charts of important figures and events in history, and members

Re: The world is in the brain

2013-04-14 Thread Craig Weinberg
On Sunday, April 14, 2013 1:27:24 PM UTC-4, Bruno Marchal wrote: On 14 Apr 2013, at 00:05, Craig Weinberg wrote: On Saturday, April 13, 2013 6:47:47 AM UTC-4, Bruno Marchal wrote: On 11 Apr 2013, at 21:18, Craig Weinberg wrote: With comp, matter relies on the numbers law, or Turing