RE: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

2021-06-15 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I don’t think that’s true. Birds, nests, eggs, and their parts all come under 
protection from the MBTA. If feathers are covered, nestlings are covered.

Kevin


From: bounce-125714362-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of david nicosia
Sent: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 5:55 PM
To: darlingtonbets ; Nancy Cusumano 
; Kenneth V. Rosenberg 
Cc: Linda Orkin ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

Young nestling birds aren't protected by the migratory bird act.  I guess that 
is true since this has been going on for decades. Wish they were.
Sent from Yahoo Mail on 
Android

On Tue, Jun 15, 2021 at 5:33 PM, darlingtonbets
mailto:darlingtonb...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Good! And let's try to get some publicity into the Ithaca Journal.

Betsy


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 Original message 
From: Nancy Cusumano 
mailto:nancycusuman...@gmail.com>>
Date: 6/15/21 4:28 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: "Kenneth V. Rosenberg" mailto:k...@cornell.edu>>
Cc: Linda Orkin mailto:wingmagi...@gmail.com>>, 
CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

Ken,

May I use your words in my letters? I think I will go straight to the top with 
this issue.

I will paraphrase...

Nancy

On Tue, Jun 15, 2021 at 4:07 PM Kenneth V. Rosenberg 
mailto:k...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Linda, thanks for bringing this mowing to everyone’s attention. In a nutshell, 
what is happening today in those fields, repeated over the entire U.S., is the 
primary cause of continued steep declines in Bobolink and other grassland bird 
populations.



Last year, because of the delays in mowing due to Covid, the fields along 
Freeze and Hanshaw Roads were full of nesting birds, including many nesting 
Bobolinks that were actively feeding young in the nests at the end of June. In 
the first week of July, Cornell decided to mow all the fields. Jody Enck and I 
wrote letters and met with several folks at Cornell in the various departments 
in charge of managing those fields (Veterinary College, University Farm 
Services) – although they listened politely to our concerns for the birds, they 
went ahead and mowed that week as dozens of female bobolinks and other birds 
hovered helplessly over the tractors with bills filled food for their 
almost-fledged young.



The same just happened over the past couple of days this year, only at an 
earlier stage in the nesting cycle – most birds probably have (had) recently 
hatched young in the nest. While mowing is occurring across the entire region 
as part of “normal” agricultural practices (with continued devastating 
consequences for field-nesting birds), the question is whether Cornell 
University needs to be contributing to this demise, while ostensibly supporting 
biodiversity conservation through other unrelated programs. Jody and I 
presented an alternative vision, where the considerable acres of fields owned 
by the university across Tompkins County could serve as a model for conserving 
populations of grassland birds, pollinators, and other biodiversity, but the 
people in charge of this management were not very interested in these options.



And there we have it, a microcosm of the continental demise of grassland birds 
playing out in our own backyard, illustrating the extreme challenges of modern 
Ag practices that are totally incompatible with healthy bird populations. I 
urge CayugaBirders to make as much noise as possible, and maybe someone will 
listen.



KEN



Ken Rosenberg (he/him/his)

Applied Conservation Scientist

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

American Bird Conservancy

Fellow, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future

k...@cornell.edu

Wk: 607-254-2412

Cell: 607-342-4594





From: 
bounce-125714085-3493...@list.cornell.edu
 
mailto:bounce-125714085-3493...@list.cornell.edu>>
 on behalf of Linda Orkin mailto:wingmagi...@gmail.com>>
Date: Tuesday, June 15, 2021 at 3:02 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fields being mowed.

After a couple year hiatus in which the Freese Road fields across from the 
gardens have been mowed late in the season allowing at least Bobolinks to be 
done with their nesting and for grassland birds to be lured into a false 
feeling of security so they have returned and I’ve counted three singing 
meadowlarks for the first time in years,  Cornell has returned to early mowing 
there as of today. And so the mayhem ensues. How many more multitudes of birds 
will die before we believe our own eyes and ears. Mow the grass while it’s 
still nutritious but are we paying attention to who is being fed. Grass taken 
from the land to pass through animals and in that inefficient process turning 
to food for 

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Rose breasted grosbeak-tan primaries

2021-05-16 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Yes, that’s a yearling male, one hatched in 2020. They molt out of the 
female-looking plumage in body feathers, but they keep their juvenal primaries, 
which are more brown than black.

Best,

Kevin

Kevin McGowan
Freeville

From: bounce-125638932-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Barbara Bauer Sadovnic
Sent: Sunday, May 16, 2021 3:11 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Rose breasted grosbeak-tan primaries

We had a male Rose breasted grosbeak with tan primaries at the feeder this 
morning. Is this an immature? He appeared otherwise typical.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/avt0okcnud0q9aq/Rose%20breasted%20Grosbeak-tan%20primaries.jpg?dl=0

Barbara Sadovnic
Enfield
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] large dark bird

2021-04-22 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Crows would not tolerate an eagle unless it was very focused on eating 
something else. Vulture sounds most likely.

Kevin



From: bounce-125566860-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Donna Lee Scott
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 12:46 PM
To: Sandra J. Kisner 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] large dark bird

Ravens hang around where eagles are, but i am not sure crows would tolerate 
being next to them.
Kevin McGowan would know.
Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 22, 2021, at 12:41 PM, Sandra J. Kisner 
mailto:s...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
By appearance the eagle seems more likely than a vulture (the neck was short), 
but would crows tolerate it?  I'll suggest it to her; I don't actually know 
where she lives, so I don't know if bald eagles are likely to be in the area.

Sandra


From: Joshua Snodgrass mailto:cedarsh...@gmail.com>>
Sent: Thursday, April 22, 2021 12:11 PM
To: Sandra J. Kisner
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] large dark bird

Any chance it was a juvenile Bald Eagle? Young birds are very dark, but have 
white markings. It would be huge compared to crows.

On Thu, Apr 22, 2021, 10:19 AM Sandra J. Kisner 
mailto:s...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
I'm afraid I don't have much information to base my question on, but I promised 
I'd try.  A friend showed me a short video on her phone of a group of crows 
that she puts food out for near the end of her long (rural) driveway, with a 
large dark bird apparently feeding with them.  The shot is from far away; not 
knowing that I would have guessed it was a bunch of grackles being joined by a 
crow, but she assures me they are her usual crows.  The guest is rather stocky, 
with a short (broad?) tail.  The crows weren't in the least disturbed by the 
visitor, so it's not likely it was a hawk.  At one point she pointed out what 
looked like a white wing bar (very hard to see at that distance).  She also 
occasionally sees turkeys, but this didn't look like a turkey to me.  Any ideas?

Sandra
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[cayugabirds-l] weird chickadee today

2021-04-16 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I was in a Zoom meeting this morning in my "office" at my kitchen table, facing 
out on a beautiful view of Yellow Barn State Forest and my bird feeders. A 
blazingly white bird popped up at my feeders and instantly drew my attention. I 
dug out my camera from the backpack on the chair next to where I sit all day 
(every day) and tried to get some photos.

Fortunately, I make a living thinking about, teaching about, and photographing 
birds, so my meeting mates didn't think I was doing anything particularly 
weird, albeit unexpected. (Two different meetings interrupted by me grabbing my 
camera and diving off screen.)

It turned out to be a Black-capped Chickadee with major pigment problems. Not 
quite a real albino, but nearly completely white with light brown cap and bib. 
It had some melanin and dark eyes, so not a "real" albino, but close enough for 
government work. (This is a very complex issue, and there are many 
physiological ways to reach the same appearance, so I'm not going to try to 
call this definitively albino, leucistic, diluted plumage, progressive graying, 
or other attempts at claiming the underlying causes.)

The first photos were horrible, but it eventually came back and I got some 
passable one, included in my eBird checklist: 
https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S85659031

Cool bird. I wonder how long it will stick around.

Kevin



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RE:[cayugabirds-l] FOY

2021-03-31 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Yes, I was celebrating the final disappearance of snow from my driveway and 
trails last Friday, but then I started to realize with the snow gone, it was 
tick season. Last year I got two imbedded in me and gave two to my indoor cats. 
:^(

Be careful out there.

Kevin

From: bounce-125509181-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Donna Lee Scott
Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2021 6:40 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] FOY

Tick !
Watch out.
Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone
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RE:[cayugabirds-l] American Crow "snow-bathing"!

2021-02-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I've seen them do it infrequently. I've never been able to get a good 
photograph of it. Marie, did you?

It's described in the BNA/Birds of the World account. Interestingly the 
description they cite said there was no preening afterward. I thought I had 
seen that.

It's always fun to see how birds bathe in things other than standing water, 
such as snow, dirt, rain, dew, or wet leaves.

Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Senior Course Developer and Instructor
Bird Academy
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/>, 
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.



From: bounce-125423235-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Marie P. Read
Sent: Saturday, February 27, 2021 2:11 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] American Crow "snow-bathing"!

Hi everyone,

Earlier today, while it was still cloudy and drizzly, I was watching an 
American Crow in the snow-covered field opposite my house do something I'd 
never seen before. While it was walking along, several times it squatted down 
into the snow and shuffled its wings just like birds do when they're bathing in 
water. Sometimes it also dug into the snow with its bill as if to loosen the 
snow around it. Then it preened a bit then repeated the process, maybe 7 or 8 
times in the space of a few minutes, before finally flying off with another 
individual.

Very cool behavior! Has anyone seen them do this before?

Marie

Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

e-mail   m...@cornell.edu<mailto:m...@cornell.edu>
Website: http://www.marieread.com
AUTHOR of:
Mastering Bird Photography: The Art, Craft, and Technique of Photographing 
Birds and Their Behavior

https://rockynook.com/shop/photography/mastering-bird-photography/?REF=101/
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vultures

2020-12-23 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Ithaca still has a good number of vultures around. I saw at least 10 today at 
the Cornell compost facility on Stevenson Road.

Kevin


From: bounce-125245051-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Linda Ann Woodard
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2020 4:11 PM
To: Peter Saracino ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vultures

Pete,
  I saw a small kettle (5 birds) when I was walking my dog in the field near 
the Equine Research Center this afternoon.
Linda Woodard

From: 
bounce-125245046-3494...@list.cornell.edu
 
mailto:bounce-125245046-3494...@list.cornell.edu>>
 On Behalf Of Peter Saracino
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2020 4:09 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vultures

Has anyone seen turkey vultures around? I was driving the back road from Geneva 
to Waterloo this morning (River Road) and in the distance saw what appeared to 
be a kettle of 8 very large, dark  birds behaving like vultures in a 
kettle.slow, circular motion. I had no binocs to confirm. Just before 
seeing this I was alerted to a dark bird flying across a farm field we with a 
distinct dihedral and am certain it wasn't a harrier. I pulled over to look and 
the bird was nowhere to be found. That's when I caught site of the "kettle" in 
the distance of birds too large to be crows.
Pete Sar
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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Bald eagle at Game Farm

2020-11-29 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
A few years ago I was photographing an immature Bald Eagle perched in the big 
tree on Dodge Rd just south of Stevenson. It started staring at the pheasant 
pens and then took off in a power flight. I didn't see any feathers fly, and 
when it came back to the same perch a moment later, it was carrying a RAT! It 
sat there and picked it apart and ate it. Is fur better than feathers?

Kevin



-Original Message-
From: bounce-125176791-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Laura Stenzler
Sent: Sunday, November 29, 2020 2:26 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Bald eagle at Game Farm

2:25 pm. There is an adult bald eagle sitting in a tree above Game Farm Rd, 
between Stevenson and Rte 365.  He’s eyeing the pheasants. Also 14 red tailed 
hawks on the fences around the pheasant farm. 

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
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[cayugabirds-l] Former Ithaca birder Ned Brinkley has passed

2020-11-22 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I just got a phone call from former Cornell undergrad and super birder Adam 
Byrne that our good friend Ned Brinkley died today in Ecuador on a birding 
trip. No details except he was hiking up a trail, got short of breathe, sat 
down and died.

For those of you who were around in the 1990s, you will remember that Ned 
Brinkley was an irresistible force of nature who transformed the birding 
community here. He was getting his Ph.D. in German, but spent all his daylight 
hours birding. I think he only slept about 4 hours a night. When he was in 
charge of the Cayuga Bird Club field trips, and they were trying to decide on 
whether to have them on Saturdays or Sundays, Ned decided that we would do them 
on BOTH days, and he would lead them. He taught the Lab's World Series of 
Birding team, the Sapsuckers, how to win, turning us from a middle-of-the-pack 
team to champions!

I'm not going to do an obituary tonight. I just wanted to get the word out. I 
know there are people on this list that knew Ned in the day, and will be 
saddened to learn of his death.

Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Senior Course Developer and Instructor
Bird Academy
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/>, 
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.



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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Birds' secret caches

2020-11-20 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
My best memory of feeder birds caching was a number of years ago on a warm 
fall/winter day and I had my sliding door open so I could take pictures of the 
birds coming to the feeders on my deck. I had my camera on a tripod just inside 
the open door. I was doing something on the computer on the kitchen table and a 
Red-breasted Nuthatch flew into the house with a sunflower seed in its bill. It 
landed on the tripod, looked around, and tucked the seed into a crevice where a 
leg came off the base, then flew away back outside. Six feet away from me.

No matter how good their spatial memory, I knew it wasn’t going to retrieve 
that one.

I love Red-breasted Nuthatches!

Kevin


From: bounce-125158003-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Robyn Bailey
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 4:33 PM
To: Chris R. Pelkie ; Peter Saracino 

Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Birds' secret caches

Working from home, and my home being a log cabin, I see birds throughout the 
day coming and caching seeds in between the logs and windowsills…anywhere they 
can fit it. Mostly chickadee, titmouse, and red-bellied woodpecker are the ones 
I see doing it.

It’s fun to think of them using my house as a larder, and using their spatial 
memory (or some luck) to find them later. I wonder how many pounds of seeds are 
collectively stashed in the crevices of my house right now?


Robyn Bailey

From: 
bounce-125157588-15067...@list.cornell.edu
 
mailto:bounce-125157588-15067...@list.cornell.edu>>
 On Behalf Of Chris R. Pelkie
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2020 2:29 PM
To: Peter Saracino mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>>
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Birds' secret caches

You’ll want to pry them out. Some years ago, a squirrel stashed sunflower seeds 
into my exhaust pipe.
OMG, there’s nothing on earth that stinks as bad as burning sunflower seeds!
(:-)
__

Chris Pelkie
Data Manager; IT Support
Center for Conservation Bioacoustics
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ccb/

On Nov 20, 2020, at 12:37 , Peter Saracino 
mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:

So I hung strings of  Christmas lights on the porch the other day but didn't 
put the bulbs in yet. They're easier to string without the bulbs. I finally got 
around to screwing the bulbs in this morning only to find single, unopened 
black oil sunflower seeds in a few of the places into which one would screw the 
actual bulb. I began to wonder how they ever could have gotten into so tight a 
space until I realized they must be places where the birds I'm feeding are 
catching food for a later date!
I think that's kind of neat!
The birds are helping me decorate! Well, sort of.
Happy Thanksgiving to all!!
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality

2020-09-16 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
“Record cold of this magnitude is not consistent with global warming. “

Why not? Global warming doesn’t mean warming happens all over the globe evenly. 
I’ve been watching our area in the northeast for the last decade, thinking 
mostly about Snowy Owl incursions, and I’ve noticed strange changes in the 
distribution of cold across the arctic, perhaps changes in the “polar vortex” 
that seem to isolate the NE as a cold spot while Alaska warms up. The last ten 
years have shown Ithaca regularly with winter temperatures lower than Nome, 
Alaska. That isn’t right.

Global warming at the poles doesn’t mean every place warms up, it means that 
the consistencies of weather patterns we could count on could be disrupted. 
Colder Ithaca winters and heat waves in Alaska are totally consistent with a 
global warming scenario. Freak arctic blasts into the rockies while the north 
pole melts also points to something freakishly abnormal happening, totally 
consistent with global warming.

Kevin


From: bounce-124948138-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of david nicosia
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 7:46 PM
To: Peter Saracino ; Jody Enck 
Cc: atvaw...@gmail.com; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] New Mexico Mass Motality

The western U.S has a history of extreme temperature changes. This event ranks 
number 3 for the biggest temperature swing in history and it occurred during 
fall migration. Most of the other big swings in temperature
occurred in the winter. What is dramatic is how cold it got and the early snows 
that fell. Temperatures in parts of the Rockies fell to 9F with winds over 50 
mph. That is insanely cold for so early in the season. The Arctic high pressure 
that came across the Rockies has denser and heavier air which flows downslope 
into California, and Oregon warming by compression leading to high winds and 
VERY dry conditions. This fuels the tremendous fires.  So in a sense it is the 
brutal unseasonable cold air that is the real cause of the conditions that 
caused the fires. I assume the fires, combined with temperatures in the 80, 90s 
and 100s dropping to the teens 20s and 30s in many areas in the Rockies with 
early snows was too much for many birds to handle causing the high mortality 
rates. I have read that people are blaming climate change on this. I don't see 
it because it is the intense cold that really fueled the fires in CA and OR and 
probably had a negative effect on the birds. Record cold of this magnitude is 
not consistent with global warming.


On Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 05:18:09 PM EDT, Jody Enck 
mailto:jodye...@gmail.com>> wrote:


Thank, Pete, for passing along the Guardian article.  Additional information 
has been forthcoming recently.  Hypotheses include movements related to smoky 
conditions in some states, coupled with those weird temperature swings recorded 
last week (90 to 100 F one day and below freezing, with snow, the next day).  
Seems less likely to be a nefarious even (e.g., poisoning) than something more 
likely caused by challenging environmental factors.

I hope more information comes out soon.

Jody W. Enck, PhD
Conservation Social Scientist, and
Founder of the Sister Bird Club Network
607-379-5940


On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 5:03 PM Peter Saracino 
mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/16/birds-falling-out-of-the-sky-in-mass-die-off-in-south-western-us-aoe


On Tue, Sep 15, 2020, 6:47 PM Tom 
mailto:atvaw...@gmail.com>> wrote:
I just learned of the mass mortality of migrating birds in New Mexico.  I read 
a CNN report.  Is there any new information on the cause?  They’re talking 
hundreds of thousands, even millions.

Tom V

Sent from my iPhone


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[cayugabirds-l] sandpipers at the compost

2020-07-19 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
The Cornell compost facility on Stevenson Road has been pretty dull since the 
shutdown. It's always slow this time of year anyway, but the near absence of 
students, and apparently changed processing of dorm food (take out not 
composted?) has meant that it's been slim pickings for crows and gulls. All 
they seem to be finding are eggs and the odd dead pheasant.

I check the compost every weekend anyway, looking for tagged crows. Saturday I 
had an adult SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER along the second drainage pond, in with at 
least 10 Killdeer. The past few weeks I have been having 6 Killdeer (2 parents 
and 4 locally produced juveniles) and a Spotted Sandpiper (didn't see 
yesterday). You can check my eBird checklist for some crude photos of the 
Semipalmated: https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S71603590.

Apparently John Garrett and Tom Schulenberg had a LEAST SANDPIPER in the same 
place today. John's checklist, https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S71629148, 
contains 2 photos that are clearly not the same bird I saw Saturday. Leg color, 
bill shape, and markings on the chest and back differ significantly.

It's always a surprise to remember that shorebird migration is already in swing 
here in July. The two sandpipers at the compost this weekend were kind of 
ragged adults. One presumes their nesting attempts up on the tundra failed, and 
it was time to get going south.

So be on the lookout. The only reliable place for shorebirds at the south end 
of the lake is Myers Point. But watch for shorebirds on any patch of mud, pond, 
or puddle.

Best,

Kevin




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[cayugabirds-l] RE: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Don’t underestimate swallows.

2020-07-01 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Very cool experience!

But, Barn Swallows aren’t always that great at what they do. Long ago in a 
place not-so-far-away, when I was in charge of the Cornell bird and mammal 
collections, I used to have regular contributors who brought in salvaged birds. 
One person brought in a surprising number of Barn Swallows. She related that 
she had on old, fat, 3-legged cat that specialized in killing them. It would 
lie down in the door of her barn, and when the swallows would swoop down and 
dive-bomb, mobbing, it would leap up and grab them.

My take-away: don’t ever turn your back on oldsters! We’ve still got some 
tricks left.

Kevin


From: bounce-124746704-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of sarah fern
Sent: Wednesday, July 1, 2020 8:15 PM
To: Peter Saracino 
Cc: AB Clark ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Don’t 
underestimate swallows.

I had a wonderful experience while sleeping in a field near a friend's house 
about 30 yrs ago. Before dawn, I drowsily awoke to the strange feeling that 
something was dive-bombing at my face & veering off at the last second. I was 
in my mummy bag with only a bit of my face exposed. As the light slowly 
increased, I could hear & then see mosquitoes, one at a time, come buzzing at 
my face and then be neatly caught by a dive-bombing barn swallow. It was scary 
because the birds came fast right up to my face & veered off with a very narrow 
miss. I could feel & hear the swish of their feathers as they turned in the 
air. They never missed a mosquito & I was in awe.

Sarah Fern

On Wed, Jul 1, 2020 at 7:30 PM Peter Saracino 
mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Anne I've had barn swallows nesting in a small shed on my property come way up 
to the house and dive bomb my cat - and the cat was far from the nest and no 
apparent threat! I love it when I'm out to mow and they go about wake hunting 
as they catch the insects my mowing stirs up. It is a sad day indeed in late 
August when I am mowing and the swallows are no more. What a gift the natural 
world.
Pete Sar

[Image removed by 
sender.]
Virus-free. 
www.avg.com

On Wed, Jul 1, 2020 at 7:26 PM 
mailto:anneb.cl...@gmail.com>> wrote:
A red-tailed hawk just sailed over my house very low surrounded on all sides by 
shrieking and Tees-zweeting swallows, both tree and barn and perhaps 20 total. 
Looked like some slower flying, shorter tailed juv barn swallows in the mix.  
They were really really committed to seeing the hawk off. How would a redtail 
ever grab a swallow?  They clearly thought it possible.

Anne

Sent from my iPhone
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Migratory Bird Teaty Act

2020-06-15 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
It’s in the enforcement. How would anyone know if you killed a bird for its 
feathers or if you found them? Safest thing for birds is no possession of parts.

Kevin

From: bounce-124703190-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Sandra J. Kisner
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 12:40 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Migratory Bird Teaty Act

I must admit I’ve always wondered about the “bird parts” bit.  It’s one thing 
to pluck a living bird or kill it for its feathers, but if I pick up a feather 
from the ground, apparently it’s still illegal to keep it.  The rest makes good 
sense.

Sandra

From: 
bounce-124703158-3493...@list.cornell.edu
 
mailto:bounce-124703158-3493...@list.cornell.edu>>
 On Behalf Of k...@empireaccess.net
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 12:34 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Migratory Bird Teaty Act

For the gentleman who intends to move a House Finch nest. It would be a 
violation of the MBTA
 Here's a quick but inclusive overview:

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918, codified at 16 U.S.C. §§ 703–712, is a 
United States federal law, first enacted in 1916 to implement the convention 
for the protection of migratory birds between the United States and Great 
Britain. The statute makes it unlawful without a waiver to pursue, hunt, take, 
capture, kill, or sell birds listed therein as migratory birds. The statute 
does not discriminate between live or dead birds and also grants full 
protection to any bird parts including feathers, eggs, and nests. Over 800 
species are currently on the list.
--
John and Sue Gregoire
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Braddock Bay Glossy Ibis second try

2020-05-11 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Wow. I wonder if I would have glanced up at them and blown them off as 
cormorants!

Kevin
Ithaca

From: bounce-124624816-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of metet...@gmail.com
Sent: Monday, May 11, 2020 7:44 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Braddock Bay Glossy Ibis second try

These 11 Ibis flew East past Braddock Bay. Found and photographed by David 
Brown. https://ebird.org/atlasny/checklist/S68873452. Mike Tetlow
Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] new year yard birds

2020-05-04 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I've been seeing lots of new migrants in the yard this weekend like everyone 
else. I need to get my hummingbird feeder up!

Today, my lunchtime walk about the property turned up a few new birds for the 
year, a couple expected, a couple not:

Nashville Warbler - brief look checking out my very active feeders
Black-throated Green Warbler - singing from the hemlocks up the hill
Osprey - high overhead headed east
Bald Eagle - immature high overhead headed west about 3 minutes after the Osprey

Kevin

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Spotting scope question

2020-04-28 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I use an angled scope from my car all the time. You just have to rotate the 
barrel so the eyepiece is pointing to the side. When scanning, you’re going to 
have to rotate it to the opposite side at one point, and you might also have to 
move the mount to another part of the window. You can even cover a much greater 
horizon than with a straight scope. You just have to get used to it.

Kevin McGowan


From: bounce-124588328-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Lynn Bergmeyer
Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2020 1:45 PM
To: Peter Saracino 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Spotting scope question

This is probably a ridiculous question but does anyone have an idea of anything 
out there for using angled scope within a vehicle?  Its not impossible from an 
engineering perspective but don't think any company has pursued for obvious 
reasons

On Mon, Apr 27, 2020, 8:45 PM Peter Saracino 
mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Hi folks. I'm in the market for a relatively inexpensive (but halfway 
decent)spotting scope (straight barrel), and am wondering if anyone out there 
can recommend one.
Thank you.
Pete Sar
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Meyers Park

2020-04-12 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Yes, there is a bit. They both look pretty much the same, and they’re often 
located in the same general area of trees (except that Fish Crows can nest WAY 
high in deciduous trees). In general, Fish Crows use more sticks and don’t make 
a mud-and-grass-filled center layer.

So, for American Crows it’s a loose basket of sticks, a mud plus dry grass 
middle layer, and then a softer inner lining.

Fish Crows skip the mud and just put in more sticks. Then they put in the soft 
lining.

As a result, the Fish Crow nests last for years. Almost every American Crow 
nest is still visible the next year (they don’t reuse them). But Fish Crow 
nests can last up to five years.

So, I think Merlins like Fish Crow nests better than American Crow nests 
because they last longer, and they’re smaller and closer to Merlin size.

But, Merlins use American Crow nests too. (Falcons don’t build their own 
nests.) I think they like Fish Crow nests also because it’s easier to bully the 
smaller crow off a nest than the larger American Crow. But, that happens, too.

Kevin


From: Gary Kohlenberg 
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 5:20 PM
To: Kevin J. McGowan 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Meyers Park

Kevin, Is there any differences in Fish Crow nest construction from A. Crow ?
Gary


On Apr 12, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Kevin J. McGowan 
mailto:k...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

Cool. That’s the old Fish Crow nest. Merlins sure do love Fish Crow nests! 
They’re using them all over town.

Kevin

From: 
bounce-124541773-3493...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-124541773-3493...@list.cornell.edu>
 
mailto:bounce-124541773-3493...@list.cornell.edu>>
 On Behalf Of Diane Morton
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 1:07 PM
To: Laura Stenzler mailto:l...@cornell.edu>>
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
mailto:cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>>
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Meyers Park

Also at Myers Park - a pair of Merlins! Very vocal - we saw them copulate, and 
one of the merlins flew to a nest in a pine tree near Pavilion A.

Diane

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 11:48 AM Laura Stenzler 
mailto:l...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
Hi
4 Bonapartes gulls, 3 with black heads and one still in winter plumage, 1 
caspian tern on sandbar with ringbilled and herring gulls, 2 female hooded 
mergansers, 2 common mergansers, several bufflehead, 1 kingfisher and 1 mink at 
Meyers Point, 11:45 am.

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu<mailto:l...@cornell.edu>
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Meyers Park

2020-04-12 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Cool. That’s the old Fish Crow nest. Merlins sure do love Fish Crow nests! 
They’re using them all over town.

Kevin

From: bounce-124541773-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Diane Morton
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 1:07 PM
To: Laura Stenzler 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Meyers Park

Also at Myers Park - a pair of Merlins! Very vocal - we saw them copulate, and 
one of the merlins flew to a nest in a pine tree near Pavilion A.

Diane

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 11:48 AM Laura Stenzler 
mailto:l...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
Hi
4 Bonapartes gulls, 3 with black heads and one still in winter plumage, 1 
caspian tern on sandbar with ringbilled and herring gulls, 2 female hooded 
mergansers, 2 common mergansers, several bufflehead, 1 kingfisher and 1 mink at 
Meyers Point, 11:45 am.

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Bald eagle, Dryden Lake

2020-04-08 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
There is an eagle sitting on a nest at the southeastern corner of the lake. 
It's mate caught a very small fish right in front of me this morning.

Kevin

From: bounce-124532185-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Eveline V. Ferretti
Sent: Wednesday, April 8, 2020 10:53 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Bald eagle, Dryden Lake

I had the great good fortune of seeing a bald eagle swoop in to land on a tree 
right by the Dryden Lake trail yesterday evening. It's the closest view I've 
ever gotten of this regal-looking bird. He (she? I'm going with "he" as he was 
not so very large) remained perched there for a long time-still there when I 
passed by again 20 minutes after first seeing him--taking in the evening view 
of the lake, where the fish were, in fact, jumping.   And where quite a few 
common mergansers were enjoying the evening quiet too (may not have been aware 
who was watching them).

Eveline Ferretti
Public Programs and Communication Administrator
Albert R. Mann Library
Cornell University
237 Mann Drive
Ithaca, NY 14853
(607) 254-4993
e...@cornell.edu


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[cayugabirds-l] Great Black-backed Gull from Maine in Ithaca

2020-02-17 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I photographed a banded young Great Black-backed Gull at the Cornell compost 
facility on 1 Feb (https://ebird.org/checklist/S64009795). I got word that this 
bird was banded in July 2018 when it was too young to fly, in York County, 
Maine. That is almost exactly 300 miles ENE of here.

I have found banded Great Black-backed Gulls here in previous years from the 
same location.

Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
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https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.



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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar

2019-11-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Unfortunately, no. Cornell is subject to copyright laws. Just because the Lab 
of Ornithology is a non-profit, that doesn’t mean that copyright laws don’t 
apply. Cornell is working to get everyone in compliance, and Bird Academy is 
taking great pains to make all of our products copyright compliant, as well as 
maximally accessible. See https://copyright.cornell.edu/ for Cornell’s position 
and more information.

“Fair Use” does not make it okay to use just anything that’s on the internet. 
Below are a couple of issues that clearly suggest archiving the presentation 
with copyright violations should not be done.
From Cornell’s Fair Use page - https://copyright.cornell.edu/fairuse
Factors to consider
Pro - Restricted access (limited to students in a class or other appropriate 
group); One-time use, spontaneous use (no time to obtain permission)
Con -  Will be making it publicly available on the Web or using other means of 
broad dissemination; Repeated or long-term use

Regrettably,  there is simply too much material in the presentation that falls 
under this guideline; removing it would make the talk unintelligible.

Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/>, 
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.



From: bounce-124085707-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Candace E. Cornell
Sent: Tuesday, November 5, 2019 9:33 AM
Cc: Alicia ; CAYUGABIRDS-L ; 
Carol Keeler 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Monday Night Seminar

I want to see the video as well. Can the Lab offer a better link?

On Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 9:20 AM Mary Jane Thomas 
mailto:mjb...@jt-mj.net>> wrote:
That is a shame.  I couldn't watch this yesterday evening and was looking 
forward to seeing and hearing it.  It would be helpful if the Lab fixed this.

MJ
Sent from my iPad


On Nov 5, 2019, at 8:12 AM, Alicia 
mailto:t...@ottcmail.com>> wrote:
 Actually, if you go to that link you get the following message:
Unfortunately, do [sic] to copyrighted content, we are unable to offer an 
archived version of this event. We do encourage you to learn more about this 
topic at 3billionbirds.org<https://www.3billionbirds.org/>
Given the importance of this issue, it's a shame that the Lab doesn't excise 
the "copyrighted content" and post the remainder - assuming the "copyrighted 
content" even needs to be excised given the doctrine of Fair Use.  This 
presentation is a something that people should be able to refer their friends 
and acquaintances to - changing the trend depends on widespread knowledge and 
understanding, and webinars are a great way to engage people who are not 
interested in reading even the most engaging print based explanations.

Alicia Plotkin




On 11/5/2019 7:56 AM, Diane Morton wrote:
You can watch the archived seminar with this link:

https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/live-event/3-billion-birds-lost-the-bird-crisis-and-what-we-can-do-about-it/

Diane Morton

On Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 7:24 AM Nancy Cusumano 
mailto:nancycusuman...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Will the recording be available?

On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 8:52 PM Carol Keeler 
mailto:carolk...@adelphia.net>> wrote:
Thank you so much for live streaming Ken Rosenburg’s talk.  It was excellent!  
I don’t drive at night so I can’t make it down to Ithaca for the Monday night 
seminars.  This was a wonderful way for me to be further informed.  Thanks 
again.

Sent from my iPad

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] US population trends; time frame for bird study

2019-09-26 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
1970 is used as the starting point because that was when the Breeding Bird 
Survey started taking data. Data on bird populations simply didn't exist before 
that, with the exception of the Christmas Bird Count. The BBS was started 
partly in response to the perceived decline in birds already occurring.

Kevin

Kevin McGowan

From: bounce-123961049-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Alicia
Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2019 1:54 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] US population trends; time frame for bird study

Decrease in children per family: In the 1970's, there were an average of 2.12 
children per family, while from 2009-2018, the number had decreased to an 
average of 1.88 and is holding steady there - a decrease of over 11% . (For 
more info, check 
here.)
  The percentage of single child families doubled from 11% of all families in 
1975 to 22% in 2016.  At this point, the birth rate alone is considerably less 
than replacement rate and even with the increase in longevity, the only reason 
the US population size is increasing is immigration.  (That is a factual, not a 
political, statement - for the record, I am not against immigration!)

When did the decline in bird population begin? The effect of human population 
size and, particularly, habitat destruction and the changing chemistry of our 
soil, air, and water, surely have taken a huge toll on birds.  But in at least 
aspect of the new bird population study is misleading.  Its baseline is 1970, 
about 50 years ago, but speaking as someone who was in high school then and who 
learned from birders who were alive at the beginning of the 20th century, it is 
clear that at least spring migration already was had suffered a significant 
decline by 1970.  One very reliable birder I got to know was born in 1905, and 
he assured me that by 1980, spring migration was a shadow of what it had been 
in the 1920s & 30s in Tompkins County.  He wondered if migratory routes had 
changed but said for whatever reason, there were only a fraction of the 
warblers, vireos, orioles, and tanagers moving through the area in the spring 
that there were 50 yrs before.  (This was a man who spent pretty much every 
waking hour of his 93 years being outdoors birding, fishing, or when he was 
younger hunting.)  Other people who had been around birding in the 1930s before 
told me much the same.

If you check accounts in Birds By Bent you'll find supporting evidence for this 
in reports made at the time.  For example, a few years ago I had 25 Palm 
Warblers in one group.  eBird was skeptical, but later when I checked Birds by 
Bent, there were several accounts of palm warbler flocks, including one from Wm 
Brewster (co-founder of the American Ornithologists' Union), writing from 
Massachusetts in 1906, who noted casually that in spring "one may often meet up 
with fifteen or twenty in a single flock or forty or fifty in the course of a 
morning walk."  I don't think any of us thinks of a walk that yields 50 Palm 
Warbler as a migration event that 'often' happens now.

So as we think about this, we need to be careful not to assume that 1970 was 
the beginning of the end, just because few of us around today remember even 
more plentiful birds before that.  There is plenty of evidence that this 
started much, much earlier, and as we look for causes and solutions, that needs 
to be kept in mind.

Alicia



On 9/26/2019 11:55 AM, Deb Grantham wrote:

You're right about population - nobody wants to talk about that anymore.

I do the same with composting but also compost ALL of my food waste. I know the 
crows and raccoons and possums and so on help with that, but that's ok with me.

Deb


From: Donna Lee Scott 
Sent: Thursday, September 26, 2019 11:54 AM
To: Deb Grantham ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] How to help birds

Compost all you can; I save out most used paper towels and tissues and mix with 
my big compost pile leaves, grass, veg garbage etc.
Having a few small woodsy plots here, I also make "wildlife hut" piles with 
most my downed branches and tree/bush trimmings, rather than send it to the 
dump.
Town of Lansing on their ONE brush pickup service per year at least makes mulch 
out of all they pick up.

But the Other Big Elephant in the room is HUMAN OVERPOPULATION, which obviously 
is helping to cause a lot of climate change , habitat loss, rain forest 
destruction, etc.
A very complex issue for which probably only massive education world-wide will 
help. Look at results of China's previous efforts at "one child per couple"...
Back in the 1970s there was the Zero Population Growth book and publicity. 
Haven't heard much about this lately.

Donna Scott
Lansing

From: 
bounce-123960446-15001...@list.cornell.edu
 

Re:[cayugabirds-l] "The mass disappearance of North American birds"

2019-09-19 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Yep, that's what I was talking about.

At 2:00 today, the journal 
Science<https://science.sciencemag.org/cgi/doi/10.1126/science.aaw1313> 
released the results of a study led by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and 
coauthors at six other institutions, showing that 29% of the breeding bird 
population has been lost from the U.S. and Canada since 1970.

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452


From: Magnus Fiskesjo 
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 3:33 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L ; Kevin J. McGowan 
; Laura Stenzler 
Subject: "The mass disappearance of North American birds"

Woa, these may be what you anticipated ...!? Shocking, sad ... / Magnus


The Crisis for Birds Is a Crisis for Us All: The mass disappearance of North 
American birds is a dire warning about the planet’s well-being.
By John W. Fitzpatrick and Peter P. Marra
Dr. Fitzpatrick is the director of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Dr. Marra is 
the director of the Georgetown Environment Initiative.
New York Times, Sept. 19, 2019
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/19/opinion/crisis-birds-north-america.html

Birds Are Vanishing From North America: The number of birds in the United 
States and Canada has declined by 3 billion, or 29 percent, over the past 
half-century, scientists find. By Carl Zimmer. New York Times, Sept. 19, 2019. 
Updated 3:27 p.m. ET
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/19/science/bird-populations-america-canada.html?action=click=RelatedLinks=Article


--
Re: Migrants
From: Kevin J. McGowan
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 9:26 PM
To: Laura Stenzler; CAYUGABIRDS-L; Magnus Fiskesjo

"Watch this space!"

Look for some fascinating, and depressing information about this topic in the 
next couple of weeks!

Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452

From: bounce-123920973-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Magnus Fiskesjo 

Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 9:10 PM
To: Laura Stenzler ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: RE:[cayugabirds-l] Migrants


What a lucky occasion!

Such flocks seem rare. I have not seen any of these birds migrating this fall, 
no warblers, despite a number of excursions. I think I have seen just one 
Yellow-rumped warbler. In Lindsay Parsons the other day, the only migrants were 
2-3 warbling vireos (also, a couple catbirds and goldfinches, but those would 
be local residents, I think?). Otherwise silent and rather empty, and most 
places seem pretty empty of birds ... is my admittedly unscientific overall 
sense. In birdbooks and online, one often sees notes on drastic declines in 
various birds, because of farming, poisons, etc. There was a discussion here 
earlier, involving experts on numbers of breeeding birds, and it was 
interesting to read, but also inconclusive, and I still wonder if there are 
things to read that sum up what we know of the overall big-picture decline of 
bird numbers, if that is what is happening?

--yrs.
Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-123920880-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-123920880-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Laura Stenzler 
[l...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 7:56 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Migrants

Hi all,
This evening between 5:30 and 7 pm there was a large migrant flock moving 
around our yard on Hunt Hill Rd, east of Ithaca. They went back and forth and 
generally stayed in the vicinity, which I found unusual and wonderful. As 
always, they were moving fast from spot to spot, hiding behind leaves and 
generally being a pain to identify. But I did see the following:
Swainson's Thrush
Robin
Parula Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Baybreasted Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Black and White Warbler
Chestnut sided Warbler
Common Yellow Throat
Red-eyed Vireo
Catbird
Chipping Sparrow
Phoebe
Eastern Wood pewee
Titmouse
Goldfinch
Chickadee
Hummingbird

Plus a couple of warblers I was unsure about.  Possible Pine Warbler and 
Blackpoll Warbler. But I am not confident about either.
It was a fun and amazing 1 1/2 hours!

Cheers!
Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Migrants

2019-09-14 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
"Watch this space!"

Look for some fascinating, and depressing information about this topic in the 
next couple of weeks!

Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452

From: bounce-123920973-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Magnus Fiskesjo 

Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 9:10 PM
To: Laura Stenzler ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: RE:[cayugabirds-l] Migrants


What a lucky occasion!

Such flocks seem rare. I have not seen any of these birds migrating this fall, 
no warblers, despite a number of excursions. I think I have seen just one 
Yellow-rumped warbler. In Lindsay Parsons the other day, the only migrants were 
2-3 warbling vireos (also, a couple catbirds and goldfinches, but those would 
be local residents, I think?). Otherwise silent and rather empty, and most 
places seem pretty empty of birds ... is my admittedly unscientific overall 
sense. In birdbooks and online, one often sees notes on drastic declines in 
various birds, because of farming, poisons, etc. There was a discussion here 
earlier, involving experts on numbers of breeeding birds, and it was 
interesting to read, but also inconclusive, and I still wonder if there are 
things to read that sum up what we know of the overall big-picture decline of 
bird numbers, if that is what is happening?

--yrs.
Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu

From: bounce-123920880-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-123920880-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Laura Stenzler 
[l...@cornell.edu]
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 7:56 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Migrants

Hi all,
This evening between 5:30 and 7 pm there was a large migrant flock moving 
around our yard on Hunt Hill Rd, east of Ithaca. They went back and forth and 
generally stayed in the vicinity, which I found unusual and wonderful. As 
always, they were moving fast from spot to spot, hiding behind leaves and 
generally being a pain to identify. But I did see the following:
Swainson's Thrush
Robin
Parula Warbler
Magnolia Warbler
Baybreasted Warbler
Tennessee Warbler
Black and White Warbler
Chestnut sided Warbler
Common Yellow Throat
Red-eyed Vireo
Catbird
Chipping Sparrow
Phoebe
Eastern Wood pewee
Titmouse
Goldfinch
Chickadee
Hummingbird

Plus a couple of warblers I was unsure about.  Possible Pine Warbler and 
Blackpoll Warbler. But I am not confident about either.
It was a fun and amazing 1 1/2 hours!

Cheers!
Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Snow goose

2019-08-25 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I don’t know how long it has been there, but it was there on 21 July, molting 
all its primaries.

Kevin



From: bounce-123850035-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Donna Lee Scott
Sent: Sunday, August 25, 2019 1:50 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Snow goose

At VanDyne Spoor Rd late yesterday afternoon near end of road. Flew OK about 
300’ from walking in road, out to marsh, as I approached it.

Has it been there since last spring or is it early coming south?

I have not been at VDS Rd. In ages, so don’t know what’s been there. Pic:
[cid:image001.jpg@01D55B5F.DC1D0DD0]

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Crow relationship .... Union Springs

2019-05-13 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
It's called "allopreening," and it's common among crow family members. I have 
some photos and a little video of it at
https://get.google.com/albumarchive/101683745969614096883/album/AF1QipOTOn8uYT5okqlVFuupJF3oZ9GirfXeONgUKOYY

All members of the genus Corvus allopreen, so far as I know. Oddly, none of the 
jays do. When I worked on Florida Scrub-Jays I noticed that they could really 
have used allopreening. In the winter they would get ticks engorged on the back 
of their heads where an individual cannot groom. And, it appeared that the 
ticks carried important diseases, too. So they could have benefitted from 
allopreening.

Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452


 
Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy, https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.




-Original Message-
From: bounce-123607715-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of John and Fritzie 
Blizzard
Sent: Sunday, May 12, 2019 11:15 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Crow relationship  Union Springs

This Mother's Day a.m. I saw a crow in our choke cherry tree & assumed it was 
an adult from the nest in the nearby spruce trees.

Here, let me say that only once in the last mo. have I heard any cawing from 
any crows so I presume they are quiet during nesting so as to not provoke any 
smaller birds into attacking them.

Almost immediately,  another crow joined the first & they seemed to really 
snuggle closely together in the steady rain.  I noticed the one on the right 
seemed to be doing something to the head of the other. They both turned so they 
were sideways to me. The one on the right appeared to be grooming the feathers 
on the top of the head of the one on the left.  I could see, with binoculars, 
that the feathers were definitely being lifted up & then were smoothed back 
down as the grooming continued.

This continued at least 5 min. & was quite interesting to watch. WHAT was going 
on???  Anyone have an answer? I have no idea if the birds were mates or family 
members since for many yrs.  a family of 3 to 7 has faithfully come to check 
out what compost I throw on the garden. Seems too soon for the eggs to have 
hatched & have a bird the size of an adult already.

Just another mystery of Nature.

Fritzie,

Union Springs,  where it's wet & getting wetter!


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[cayugabirds-l] Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ospreys are still rare. Here’s what might be mistaken for one

2019-03-18 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Good points, Dave. I too saw that Bald Eagle yesterday at Stewart Park and was 
surprised at how Osprey-like it looked. I also took crappy photos of it, and 
will try to get them in my eBird checklist soon.


Kevin


From: bounce-123439153-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Dave Nutter 

Sent: Monday, March 18, 2019 8:57 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Ospreys are still rare. Here’s what might be mistaken 
for one

Over the past several days there have been several reports of Ospreys.

Candace Cornell, who has observed and compiled reports of the Ospreys nesting 
around Cayuga Lake during their expansion for several years, notes that this 
arrival is an unprecedented couple weeks early, not just for the species, but 
for the individual birds believed to be returning to Myers Point. In order to 
figure out what is happening and why (Is climate change a factor?), it’s 
essential to have good information.

In winter, reports of Ospreys in Upstate NY are presumed to be erroneous 
observations of immature Bald Eagles unless there’s good evidence for the 
Osprey ID. Not all birders are aware that one stage of young Bald Eagles’ 
plumage includes a white belly and a dark mask on a whitish head on a generally 
brown large raptor. Today I photographed such a Bald Eagle at Stewart Park, 
where some Osprey reports have been made. My description of the bird is below 
in the excerpt of my eBird report. There are 2 rather bad photos taken 
awkwardly through my binoculars also included in the eBird report, which I hope 
readers can access via the link.

A plea:
When submitting any eBird report which includes a species which eBird says is 
rare, PLEASE include in the requested “details” a description of the bird 
discussing what you observed - field marks such as shape, pattern, color, 
behavior, sound, anything you noticed about it that helped you ID the bird (or 
that made ID difficult or any missing field marks), and why you think it was 
that species and not anything else or something more common. If you can take a 
photo, even a crappy one, do so, and include it. This makes all the difference 
between reports that can be useful to others and reports that must be chucked 
for lack of evidence. Even a well-documented misidentification can be 
educational to oneself and others and maybe it can help future instructors or 
MERLIN.

I think Osprey will be removed from the rare category for Tompkins County on 
March 27, unless eBird staff get tired of all the reports and switch the 
settings.

As far as I know (and I have not checked this evening), NO ONE has included a 
photo of a local Osprey in an eBird report yet, and I think I am the only 
person who made an effort to describe what they thought was and what was not an 
Osprey. Everyone else’s reports are going to be confirmed or not by eBird 
solely on the reputation of the observers, not the observations, and that makes 
me uncomfortable.

That’s my rant for the day, since there is no SFO course in which to say stuff 
like this. Thanks for humoring me by at least reading this far.

- - Dave Nutter

Begin forwarded message:

From: ebird-checkl...@cornell.edu
Date: March 18, 2019 at 8:22:01 PM EDT
To: nutter.d...@mac.com
Subject: eBird Report - NY:TOM:Ithaca: Stewart Pk taxi stop in car, Mar 18, 2019

NY:TOM:Ithaca: Stewart Pk taxi stop in car, Tompkins, New York, US
Mar 18, 2019 11:57 AM - 12:39 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.8 mile(s)
Comments:...Unsuccessful quest for Osprey for which there have been 
sporadic reports lacking description or reputation to back them up. But I did 
find a suspicious immature Bald Eagle with mostly white underparts and a dark 
mask on a light head.

25 species (+1 other taxa)

Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)  1 Immature perched in treetop on 
Jetty Woods: very large vertical raptor; generally brown above; mostly white 
belly & neck; blotchy brown breast; dark mask on dirty whitish head; when it 
flew it showed wing linings largely white; very broad wings; very large hooked 
bill; large head; rather wide body. Challenging photos through binoculars, 
rather backlit, and showing the head less well than I hoped. Photo session cut 
short by model flying away. A birder walking by asked if the bird was an 
Osprey, as did a person I showed a photo. I hope the photos can be educational.


View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53995582

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Re:[cayugabirds-l] RWBB /other spring signs

2019-03-13 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
A few lunch-time observers at the Cornell Lab today saw hundreds of Red-winged 
Blackbirds and Grackles migrating past, but the big deal was the number of 
geese going over. For the almost hour I was out there on "Mt Sapsucker," the 
hill by the parking lots, one of our enthusiasts counted 22,600 Canada Geese, a 
few hundred Snow Geese, and 22 Cackling Geese. Before we came out, my son, Jay, 
had a small group of greater White-fronted Geese, and at least one Ross's Goose.

Few raptors, though. We were all hoping for Golden Eagles, but had to make do 
with a few Red-tailed Hawks, and singles of Red-shouldered Hawk and Northern 
Harrier.

Essentially every minute of my hour, we had skeins of Canada Geese in view. It 
was almost exhausting trying to look at every flock. During the brief moments 
when we didn't have geese overhead, if you looked with your binoculars into the 
distance, you could always find dozens of distant flocks.

An impressive migration day. Too bad I had to spend most of it inside behind a 
computer!

Kevin





From: bounce-123424683-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Donna Lee Scott 

Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2019 6:12 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] RWBB /other spring signs

FOY Red Winged Blackbird on Algerine Rd, Lansing. Male on top of lone tree near 
frozen pond.

26 Wild Turkeys on Davis Rd up the hill southeast of Algerine. None displaying.

A few days ago neighbor at 581 Lansing Station Rd reported 2 mature Bald Eagles 
exhibiting courting behavior over lake & in tree in their yard. "Two eagles "in 
love" they called it.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone
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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Pale chickadee

2019-01-25 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Michele,

Chances are it's an aberrant Black-capped Chickadee. See 
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/crows/brown-headed%20chickadee.htm for an example 
of a bird we saw back in 2004.

The cap color is only one of several differences between Boreal and 
Black-capped chickadees. Boreal has a gray, not white, cheek and nape. The 
sides and flanks are rather dark brown. It has no white in the wings and tail.  
Look for those things when you see the bird again.

Best,

Kevin



From: bounce-123270698-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Michele Emerick Brown
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2019 11:29 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Pale chickadee

Hello All,
I've been seeing what can best be described as a pale Black-capped Chickadee at 
my feeders this winter. The cap is pale brownish grey. It looks like a 
Black-capped Chickadee in every other way.  It is very shy, so I've had no luck 
getting a photo. Could this be a Boreal Chickadee? I'm on BUFFALO Hill in 
Caroline, but this seems a bit south for its range.

Thanks,
Michele
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] ID help? white winged gull sp. on Stewart Park ice edge.

2019-01-23 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Good call, Josh. That’s a first cycle Glaucous Gull, and you’ve described all 
the right characteristics.

I had a first cycle at the Cornell compost on Stevenson Road last Saturday, 
likely the same bird.

Best,

Kevin


From: bounce-123265321-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Joshua Snodgrass
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 4:54 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] ID help? white winged gull sp. on Stewart Park ice 
edge.

Hi friends,
Sorry if this is an inappropriate venue for this question. I saw what I believe 
was a 1st winter Glaucous Gull on the ice edge at Stewart Park as viewed from 
East Shore Park. I have little experience with white winged gull species. 
Through the scope the bird was all white with light brownish tonal markings. 
The bill seemed large and straight through the scope, with a clear dark tip and 
pale pinkish base (no fading to black), pink base was about 3/4 of bill length. 
Size was difficult to judge at that distance, but seemed as large as the nearby 
herring gulls, and seemed to have a relatively flat head. I've attached a link 
to my eBird checklist with poor digiscoped photos. Any experts out there 
willing to help a beginning guller?
Thanks,
Josh
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S51970707
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RE:[cayugabirds-l] White Crowned Sparrow

2018-11-23 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
We had two on Yellow Barn Rd yesterday, too. Both adults, which is sort of 
surprising. It seems that hatch-year birds, with brown crowns, are more 
frequently seen out of season than adults.

Kevin

From: bounce-123128320-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 On Behalf Of Donna Lee Scott
Sent: Friday, November 23, 2018 10:10 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] White Crowned Sparrow

...along with White Throated Sparrow scootching around in leaves under bushes 
today.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone
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[cayugabirds-l] Pine Siskin at Lab feeders

2018-09-18 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
An unexpected PINE SISKIN just showed up north of the Lab building. 
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48588537. Purple Finches have been around.

Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/>, 
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.



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Re:[nysbirds-l] [cayugabirds-l] Fox Sparrows in Tompkins County (long)

2018-04-20 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I've still got a few Fox Sparrows, too. I can't ever remember waking up to them 
singing in my yard for over a week before. It always seemed that a few would be 
present a few days in the spring and fall, and that was it.


No doubt our lingering winter is to blame. They don't go far south for the 
winter, but they go pretty far north to breed, so it makes sense that they 
should be aware of local weather and be cautious before they make the final 
move.


A fun new addition to the Merlin app (free!) for your phone is that when you 
browse birds in a specific area, you see bar charts of the likelihood of 
occurrence for the whole calendar year. You can find the same information in 
eBird, but it takes more finagling to find it there. In Merlin, go to "Explore 
Birds" from the main screen, go up to the icon at the top that looks like lines 
and spots, click "Likely Birds," then filter by your current location and date. 
I suggest using "Family - Most Likely." That puts all the sparrows together, 
all the ducks, etc. Scroll down to the sparrows, and there, 11th on the list is 
Fox Sparrow. You can see by the bar chart that it's never abundant, but that 
it's usually seen in March and April, and that we're getting to the end of the 
narrow window when they normally occur.


If you browse the sparrows, you see that the next most/least likely sparrow 
here this time of year is White-crowned. But, comparing the two bar charts 
shows that Fox Sparrows should be on their way out, while White-crowns should 
just be coming in.


Also interesting, if you browse farther down the list, is that we have just 
gone through the peak time of Vesper Sparrow reports. And, unlike the other two 
species, they breed here! But, apparently they show up more on eBird checklists 
during April as they arrive and can't get to their breeding grounds yet, what 
with the snow and all, and show up in parking lots and roadsides the way they 
have done this last week or two. There have been dozens of Vesper Sparrow 
reports all over the county this last week and a half, and that perfectly 
reflects the bar chart in Merlin based on ebird checklists.


I've been a half-hearted endorser of Merlin over the last few years because, 
frankly, I don't need the help identifying birds. But, the app is becoming much 
more than what it started as, and it's growing all the time. It's now one of 
the fastest and easiest portals to finding what birds are to be expected at a 
specific time of year, pretty much everywhere in the world. Soon it is going to 
be a reference source for birds all over the world, with photos, songs, and 
maps. Already it covers all of the US and Canada, Mexico, and most of Central 
America, as well as parts of Colombia and northwestern Europe. And it's growing 
every day.


I did a West Coast business trip in February, and I used Merlin to tell me what 
birds to expect in the places I visited. I went to Oregon, and Merlin told me 
that Acorn Woodpeckers would be common in Medford, west of the Cascade 
Mountains, but would be rare in Klamath Falls, east of the mountains. It told 
me that I'd be seeing California Quail all along most of my drive to San Diego, 
but when I went to Joshua Tree National Park, I would be seeing Gambel's Quail.


So, just a head's up to the birding community. The Cornell Lab's Merin app is 
not just some cute toy for beginners. (Although, it did get my bird-averse 
sister to start liking looking at birds.) It's becoming a powerful tool for 
traveling birders to use all over the world. Currently, it only has photos, 
maps, and information for the areas I mentioned above. But, it already can give 
you a list of the most likely birds you will see anywhere on earth. Well, 
anywhere there are eBird checklists. But, every eBird checklist you put in from 
some exotic locale helps the program refine its results and improve the 
accuracy of its predictions. And, every photo you upload to an eBird checklist 
from a foreign location gets Merlin closer to being able to identify that 
species from photos, and closer to having photos available in the app.


Latin America has an avid and active birding presence, so we can expect big 
strides there in the near future. But, it also has the most diverse and complex 
suite of birds on the planet, so, that's a hurdle. I personally hope that 
southern and eastern Europe will be covered completely soon (I have a trip 
there scheduled in late June), but it seems that India is going to jump ahead 
in the line ahead of other expected regions.


Indian birders have enthusiastically embraced eBird the last couple of years, 
and they're pumping sightings and photos into the database. I spoke to someone 
in Oregon at the bird festival I was attending (Winter Wings) who was from 
India. He wanted to show me his photos from birding in India (very nice), and I 
told him to put them into checklists in eBird because every photo uploaded for 
a species (especially good ones like his) put 

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca Ospreys, and other stuff

2018-04-02 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Bald Eagles are apparently on a nest at the south end of Dryden Lake, with at 
least 2 or 3 immatures staying in the area. That might be a damper on Osprey 
nesting there.


Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan



From: bounce-122435459-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
<bounce-122435459-3493...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Candace Cornell 
<cec...@gmail.com>
Sent: Monday, April 2, 2018 6:56 PM
To: Dave Nutter; CAYUGABIRDS-L; Cynthia L. Sedlacek
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Ithaca Ospreys, and other stuff

I have to correct my email from yesterday. The pair at Cargill have been at the 
nest since March 31.

I saw an osprey sitting on the Church Hill nest in Lansing for a few minutes 
today, but it flew and didn't return. Orpheus and Ophelia at Salt Point are 
working on their nest, but also adding a few sticks to the unclaimed Salmon 
Creek nest. They can't help themselves, they are compulsive nest builders. The 
empty nest boxes will get occupied eventually.

>From yesterdays drive-by survey of over 100 nests, many corroborated by 
>reports from the Sedlaceks, Becky Sewell, Dave Nutter, and others, I estimate 
>well over one-third of the Cayuga Lake Basin pairs had returned by April 1, 
>2018. By next weekend, most will have arrived. Some of the empty nest 
>platforms will hopefully be claimed by young pairs during the next three weeks.

Thanks for everyone's help! Keep reporting your sightings.

Eyes to the sky!
Candace



On Sun, Apr 1, 2018 at 9:48 AM, Candace Cornell 
<cec...@gmail.com<mailto:cec...@gmail.com>> wrote:
Thank you Dave and Cindy to everyone for reporting yesterday's arrival of the 
ospreys. We should see most ospreys returning to their nests in the next two 
weeks. Unmated adult birds will also be checking out vacant nest boxes and 
vying for mates. Young osprey, hoping to breed, usually arrive a week or so 
after the adult wave, many acting like intruders and pestering nesting pairs.

So far Olive and Olin have returned to their McGovern Fields, Ophelia and 
Orpheus to Salt Point, the Treman Marine Park pair are on the nest, as well as 
the Union Fields ospreys. I have not seen the Cargil pair yet, but the always 
arrive at least a day before the Salt Point ospreys and are probably here.

Keep you eyes on the vacant nest platforms at Dryden Lake, Taughannock Park, 
and in Ithaca (the suspension bridge nest in Stewart Park, Hog's Hole, Newman 
Golf Course, and Cherry St.).  Around Lansing, there are vacant platforms at 
Millikan Station, Salmon Creek at Salt Point, Church Hill, and two on Portland 
Point. At least a few of these will be utilized this year.

Keep your eyes to the sky and please keep reporting any ospreys you see nesting!

Many thanks,
Candace

On Sat, Mar 31, 2018 at 8:49 PM, Dave Nutter 
<nutter.d...@mac.com<mailto:nutter.d...@mac.com>> wrote:
This morning (31 March) I went to Mount Pleasant, joined by Ann Mitchell and 
later Gary Kohlenberg. We were all hoping the south wind would bring migrating 
raptors.

Local birds included singles and pairs of Red-tailed Hawks near & far, an 
occasional Common Raven (including one who was accompanied/chased for awhile by 
a Red-tail who mimicked its every move), Turkey Vultures, Killdeer, an Eastern 
Meadowlark that visited the single tree near the observatory, an American 
Kestrel hovering over the valley between Mt Pleasant’s twin “peaks”, a possible 
distant Red-shouldered Hawk, a large Accipiter in deep-flapping display flight 
far to the south, and American Crows busy flying back and forth and tormenting 
any Raven they found.

Migrants included a flock of 14 Great Blue Herons, a few small flocks of Canada 
Geese (<100 birds in 3 hours), lots of small flocks of Common Grackles and a 
few flocks of Red-winged Blackbirds (in addition to a near-constant background 
of scattered northbound Icterids), American Robins singly or in small flocks, 
small flocks of roaming Horned Larks with 3 probable American Pipits near or 
among them.

Migrant raptors were few: a couple Turkey Vultures, a couple Red-tailed Hawks, 
at least one Cooper’s Hawk, and a Northern Harrier. Among the best was a 
northbound OSPREY (year bird for me!) passing to the west of us. Perhaps it was 
bound for some nest in the basin, but evidently not down in Ithaca.

When I got home, I decided to heed Candace’s call to keep track of Osprey 
nests. I took a quick bike ride around Cass Park combined with a walk around 
Treman Marina. In short order I saw one Osprey flying south past the Children’s 
Garden hunting over Cayuga Inlet, even though the water was muddy and a racing 
crew meet was underway.

I continued north on the Cayuga Waterfront Trail. No Ospreys were perched at or 
near the Union Field nest, nor the Hog’s Hole nest platform, nor the Newman 
Golf Course nest platform.

But the Treman Marina nest (#59 on the Osprey Trail) had one Osprey on the nest 
and a second Osprey on one of 

[cayugabirds-l] Not siskins, but towhees!

2018-01-13 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I was just sitting at my kitchen table looking outside at the feeders on my 
deck wishing that I'd get a siskin, too. A bird popped up in the branches just 
of the deck, and it was a male EASTERN TOWHEE. I was shocked (they rarely come 
up to the deck even in the regular time of year).


I fumbled with my camera and eventually got a few recognizable shots. Then I 
realized that there was another bird in the tree, and it was a FEMALE towhee, 
brown where the male was black.


They dropped down out of sight without coming onto the deck where juncos and a 
cardinal were eating seed. They might have found some food that had dropped off 
the deck, but I'm not sure.


In other birding news, it was a crummy day to go birding today. But, I did have 
a small flock of Snow Buntings (20) and Horned Larks (5) feeding on the piles 
at the Cornell compost facility today. 450 American Crows (my objective, of 
course), but fewer than a dozen gulls, only 1 vulture (Turkey), and actually 
not many Red-tailed Hawks.


Kevin


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[cayugabirds-l] Red-throated Loon in field near Game Farm

2018-01-06 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I went to the game farm today to census crows and try to find some year birds 
(like Black Vulture). I was looking in the active pheasant pen at the NW corner 
of farm where the Black Vultures have been hanging out. I didn't see Black 
Vultures, but I noticed a RED-THROATED LOON sitting in the snow in the field 
north of the farm! Ten feet into Dryden!

Although the loon made a pitiful effort to "run" away from me, it was pretty 
simple to wrap it up in a blanket and pick it up. Its wings and feet were 
functioning well, and I didn't see any blood, injuries, or abrasions on it, so 
I decided to take it to Cayuga Lake and release it.

It did not understand, of course, anything I was trying to do for it, but it 
knew what the lake was. As I was carrying it down to the shore at East Shore 
Park, it started lunging forward in my hands and making running motions with 
its feet. It swam away quickly when I released it, dove, came up, flapped, and 
started preening.

Not the way I thought my day was going to start.

I have a photo in my checklist at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41675570.

Kevin


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[cayugabirds-l] count week birds

2017-12-30 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I was scouting out my Christmas bird count area yesterday, and did a little 
birding today. I managed to see a good number of things that are often missed 
on the Ithaca CBC, so at least they will be count week. Here is an incomplete 
list.

Snow Goose - a single bird flying past Myers Point yesterday
Cackling Goose - a single bird in with a massive number of Canada Geese flying 
over Stewart Park going out to the lake this afternoon; possibly disturbed off 
the Newman golf course. I could not refind it on the water.
Mute Swan - 8 individuals flying in from the north and landing off Stewart Park 
this afternoon
Tundra Swan - 11 individuals in the water off Stewart Park this afternoon
American Wigeon - two south of Myers Point yesterday, and one or two in the big 
Redhead flock
Canvasback - not usually uncommon, but I saw fewer than a dozen in the Redhead 
flock yesterday, which I estimated (twice) to be 10,000 ducks
Ring-necked Duck - many in Redhead flock
Greater Scaup - several south of Myers
Lesser Scaup - some in with Redhead flock
(Possible) Surf Scoter - far NW of East Shore Park this afternoon; too far for 
positive ID, but head shape looked good, and I never saw white in the wings, 
even when it was preening
White-winged Scoter - At least 11 in flock just off East Shore this afternoon; 
included 3 adult males; foraging for zebra mussels
Long-tailed Duck - 3 off East Shore this afternoon, 3 off Myers yesterday (but 
out of count area)
Common Goldeneye - a few off East Shore
Red-breasted Merganser - at least one female south of Myers, and a group of 4 
females off East Shore yesterday
Ruddy Duck - 3 in Redhead flock off East Shore yesterday
Horned Grebe - 2 far NW of East Shore this afternoon. I only found them because 
they swam past my scoter "sp." that I was intently staring at in the scope for 
what seemed like an hour. They were so small and pale, and the shimmer was so 
intense that I am pretty sure I would not have picked them up on a normal scan.
Great Blue Heron - flying over Aldi's parking lot this afternoon
Black Vulture - 4 at the Game Farm today. New to count!!!
American Coot - never missed, I don't think, but I only had 7 at Myers and 3 in 
the Redhead flock
Iceland Gull - 3 on the ice north of Stewart Park at dusk this evening. Gulls 
are short this year. I've seen very few individuals of Ring-billed Gull, and 
after having 5 in one day a month ago, I haven't seen a Lesser Black-backed 
Gull for weeks
Fish Crow - Not rare, but could be missed. They seem to have stopped coming to 
the Cornell compost facility as of this week, which is their normal pattern. 
They want dorm waste, not stuff from greenhouses, so they often take a break 
until school starts up again at the end of January. I did encounter a few of 
them quietly foraging with the noisy American Crow group in Ithaca near Beverly 
J. Martin school this afternoon. We have more than half of the local population 
banded and tagged right now, so if you read the letters on a tag of a bird you 
suspect of being a Fish Crow, let me know and I'll check out who it is.
(outside the count area) American Pipit - One or two on the point at Myers and 
the gravel spit off Salt Point. Outside the CBC zone, but still present for 
people who want to get a jump on the 2018 David Cup.

Okay, we know these birds are in the area, so let's get them officially on the 
count! Also, I heard that a couple of Northern Pintail were seen yesterday in 
the big Redhead flock when it was along the east shore.

Anyone else have notable birds for count week so far?

Kevin



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Re: [cayugabirds-l] the four Black Vultures

2017-12-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Maybe. They do breed in the state and have become more common over the last few 
years.


Kevin





From: bounce-122158375-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
<bounce-122158375-3493...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of psaracin 
<psara...@rochester.rr.com>
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 5:24 PM
To: Kevin J. McGowan; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] the four Black Vultures

Hi Kevin. Is the vultures' presence a sign of their creeping advance into the 
state?
Thanks.
Pete



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 Original message 
From: "Kevin J. McGowan" <k...@cornell.edu>
Date: 12/27/17 3:41 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L <cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] the four Black Vultures


Yesterday I got a good look at the four Black Vultures that have been hanging 
around. They were sitting together on one of the compost piles at the Cornell 
facility on Stevenson Road. Two of the four had very black faces and feathers 
higher up on the back of the head, indicating that they are young birds hatched 
this year. The other two had gray, wrinkled faces of adults.



I saw both juveniles interact with an adult, pecking at each other’s bill in 
what looked like an “affectionate” way. (We use the term “affiliative behavior” 
for things like grooming and other positive interactions.) They may have done 
some brief allopreening, but I couldn’t tell for sure.



Black Vultures are known to have a complex social system where they associate 
and cooperate with kin. Young Black Vultures are known to hang out with their 
parents up until the next breeding season.



I suspect this group is a mated pair with two offspring. That would explain why 
we always see the four together.



Also present was the leucistic Turkey Vulture that has been seen off and on for 
a number of years.



I have photos at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41325840.



Kevin




Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
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[cayugabirds-l] the four Black Vultures

2017-12-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Yesterday I got a good look at the four Black Vultures that have been hanging 
around. They were sitting together on one of the compost piles at the Cornell 
facility on Stevenson Road. Two of the four had very black faces and feathers 
higher up on the back of the head, indicating that they are young birds hatched 
this year. The other two had gray, wrinkled faces of adults.

I saw both juveniles interact with an adult, pecking at each other's bill in 
what looked like an "affectionate" way. (We use the term "affiliative behavior" 
for things like grooming and other positive interactions.) They may have done 
some brief allopreening, but I couldn't tell for sure.

Black Vultures are known to have a complex social system where they associate 
and cooperate with kin. Young Black Vultures are known to hang out with their 
parents up until the next breeding season.

I suspect this group is a mated pair with two offspring. That would explain why 
we always see the four together.

Also present was the leucistic Turkey Vulture that has been seen off and on for 
a number of years.

I have photos at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41325840.

Kevin


Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy, 
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses.



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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park this morning - two Greater White-fronted Geese

2017-12-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
It's an understandable mistake. These two geese are marked exactly like Greater 
White-fronted Geese, with white behind the bill and a thin white stripe on the 
side. They differ from the "real" geese by being enormous. They are fat and 
stocky and have a huge rear end. They're as big or larger than Canada Geese. 
Greater White-fronts should be slender and slightly smaller than Canadas.

Kevin

-Original Message-
From: Paul Anderson [mailto:p...@grammatech.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 2:51 PM
To: Kevin J. McGowan <k...@cornell.edu>; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
<cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park this morning - two Greater 
White-fronted Geese

I just learned that two domestic geese have been hanging around in Stewart 
Park, and that they were seen this afternoon at the high school playing fields. 
I think I jumped to the wrong conclusion; the geese I saw were sleeping and 
tightly tucked up, so I didn't get to see any patterns on the head. I think it 
is more likely they are the same two domestics seen later.

Sorry if I sent anyone on wild goose chase!


On 12/27/2017 12:02 PM, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
> I just tried and failed for Paul's geese. Perhaps the 5 Bald Eagles (3 
> adults, 2 immatures) hunting over the park had something to do with it. The 
> dead goose on the ice looked to be a Canada.
>
> Kevin
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-122157940-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
> [mailto:bounce-122157940-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Paul 
> Anderson
> Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 10:02 AM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L <cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park this morning - two Greater 
> White-fronted Geese
>
> The viewing conditions from the East side of Stewart Park this morning were 
> quite good; it's bright and although it is quite cold, there is very little 
> wind.
>
> The most notable birds were two Greater White-fronted Geese sleeping next to 
> a small group of gulls and easy to find. If these two stick around for the 
> bird count we will have a record. The species has been seen only twice 
> before, and only solo.
>
> I searched in vain for a Glaucous gull, but found none.
>
> The raft of ducks is visible from there, but they are much better seen from 
> East Shore Park. Among them were two Pintail, two Ruddy Ducks, a handful of 
> Lesser Scaup, and a few Ring-necked Ducks. I was surprised to find no 
> Canvasback.
>
>
> --
> Paul Anderson, VP of Engineering, GrammaTech, Inc.
> 531 Esty St., Ithaca, NY 14850
> Tel: +1 607 273-7340 x118; http://www.grammatech.com
>
>
> --
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park this morning - two Greater White-fronted Geese

2017-12-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I just tried and failed for Paul's geese. Perhaps the 5 Bald Eagles (3 adults, 
2 immatures) hunting over the park had something to do with it. The dead goose 
on the ice looked to be a Canada.

Kevin

-Original Message-
From: bounce-122157940-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-122157940-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Paul Anderson
Sent: Wednesday, December 27, 2017 10:02 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Stewart Park this morning - two Greater White-fronted 
Geese

The viewing conditions from the East side of Stewart Park this morning were 
quite good; it's bright and although it is quite cold, there is very little 
wind.

The most notable birds were two Greater White-fronted Geese sleeping next to a 
small group of gulls and easy to find. If these two stick around for the bird 
count we will have a record. The species has been seen only twice before, and 
only solo.

I searched in vain for a Glaucous gull, but found none.

The raft of ducks is visible from there, but they are much better seen from 
East Shore Park. Among them were two Pintail, two Ruddy Ducks, a handful of 
Lesser Scaup, and a few Ring-necked Ducks. I was surprised to find no 
Canvasback.


--
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531 Esty St., Ithaca, NY 14850
Tel: +1 607 273-7340 x118; http://www.grammatech.com


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] European Goldfinch

2017-12-09 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Phil,


Thanks for posting that. I wasn't aware of more than incidental nesting reports 
after that release. Also, in the other direction, European Goldfinch seems to 
be established in Prospect Park in Brooklyn, with individuals being seen around 
that area.


So, Bob's bird might be an escaped cage bird, but it could have found its way 
here from the other new nesting areas. It's definitely not "countable" by 
American Birding Association standards, but it's certainly biologically 
interesting (and beautiful!). Putting in eBird reports for these potentially 
establishing species is important. IF they become established, we will have a 
record of how and when it happened.


Thanks, Bob, for putting the word out.


Best,


Kevin



Kevin J. McGowan
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452



From: bounce-122116554-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
<bounce-122116554-3493...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of phil mc 
<mc14...@yahoo.com>
Sent: Friday, December 8, 2017 6:26 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] European Goldfinch

For those who saw the European Goldfinch his afternoon, or might be interested. 
 Here is a link to the eBird article on released songbirds birds in the Chicago 
area, including European Goldfinches, with nesting reported since 2006.

Species Survey Strategy – Recently Introduced European Songbirds | Wisconsin 
Breeding Bird Atlas 
II<http://ebird.org/content/atlaswi/news/species-survey-strategy-recently-introduced-european-songbirds/>
<http://ebird.org/content/atlaswi/news/species-survey-strategy-recently-introduced-european-songbirds/>


Phillip McNeil
607.342.5031
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Identification and Status of White-faced and Glossy ibises in southeastern LA

2017-11-06 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
My impression was that it was an immature bird. The bill was immaculate and the 
head and neck were heavily streaked/spotted. It had no indication of white 
lines on face. So, no easy ID. Van Remsen says not to try it in his post.

But, my sense from my (not enough) experience with these two species in the 
field and looking at images of non-breeding birds is that White-faced have 
paler faces that contrast more with the body than Glossy. A quick review of 
November-only photos in eBird Media Search Tool reinforced that impression. The 
background dark on the face of most spot/streaked-faced White-faced Ibises 
appeared to be brown, and a shade or two paler than the body, making the face 
contrast with the body and stand out. On most Glossies the background face 
color was dark and close to the body color, and the whole face did not appear 
to contrast.

The Armitage Road bird had a very strong contrasting face. I haven’t looked at 
my photos on the computer yet.

Kevin

From: bounce-122021942-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-122021942-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dave Nutter
Sent: Monday, November 6, 2017 9:15 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Identification and Status of 
White-faced and Glossy ibises in southeastern LA

Alicia Plotkin kindly forwarded this information about separating Glossy & 
White-faced Ibis. The first step is figuring out what age the bird is, so I’m 
looking for evidence about the Armitage Rd bird.
- - Dave Nutter


Begin forwarded message:
From: Alicia >
Date: November 5, 2017 at 10:17:47 PM EST
To: Ann Mitchell >
Subject: Fwd: Re: [LABIRD-L] Identification and Status of White-faced and 
Glossy ibises in southeastern LA
Saw your post on the ibis ID and thought you might be interested in this 
discussion that took place recently on the Louisiana bird list, where the 
ranges of the two ibises overlap.


 Forwarded Message 
Subject:

Re: [LABIRD-L] Identification and Status of White-faced and Glossy ibises in 
southeastern LA

Date:

Sat, 21 Oct 2017 14:03:21 -0500

From:

Steven W. Cardiff 

Reply-To:

Steven W. Cardiff 

To:

labir...@listserv.lsu.edu



Labirders-

 The only thing I would add is that adults in non-breeding plumage

retain the "reddish/chestnut" upper wing coverts (shoulder).  This is how

they can be distinguished from immatures.  So, if you are panning through a

flock during fall-winter, individuals with the chestnut upper wing patch

will be adults and should have their definitive iris and facial skin colors.



Steve Cardiff



On Sat, Oct 21, 2017 at 11:52 AM, James V Remsen 
 wrote:



> LABIRD:  Part 2:

>

> Here are the ID problems, as I understand them so far. Steve, Donna, and

> others please chime in to repair any damage below:

>

> ==

>

> JUVS: these are the brownish necked individuals with few if any streaks,

> often with pale blotches on the bill.  These are NOT identifiable to

> species as far as anyone knows and should always be reported as Plegadis

> sp. in SE LA (including Florida and River parishes). All of them have gray

> facial skins and dark eyes.

>

> ==

>

>  IMMS: In first basic plumage, the neck becomes streaked.  The facial skin

> is gray in both species.  The iris in White-faced at some point becomes

> red.  So, if you do see a streak-necked bird with a red eye, then it is

> WFIB, but a dark-eyed bird cannot be safely identified.  A real problem is

> that as White-faced matures, it can pass through a stage that looks very

> Glossy-like in still having dark eye and facial skin but having traces of

> white around face that can make it look like a Glossy.  For example, the

> following photos were found by Tony Leukering from CA and NV, where GLIB

> would be extremely unusual, so these are presumably WFIB:

>

>  California:  https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/70670231#_ga=2.29961980.

> 25890241.1507509707-334541348.1399337695

>  California:  https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/68874791#_ga=2.

> 265350860.25890241.1507509707-334541348.1399337695

>  California:  https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/34774341#_ga=2.59837166.

> 25890241.1507509707-334541348.1399337695

>  Nevada:  https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/69398871#_ga=2.

> 265350860.25890241.1507509707-334541348.1399337695

>

>

> An open question is how early WFIB begin to acquire a red iris.  We can

> all contribute to this by uploading photos to eBird.

>

> ==

>

>

> ADULTS in basic (non-breeding) plumage, i.e. streaked neck, lack of

> breeding colors around face (but wing coverts still glossy green etc:  the

> most reliable way to tell them apart is by iris color: red in WFIB, 

[cayugabirds-l] ibis on Armitage rd, Wayne Co

2017-11-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
This afternoon, Laura Stenzler and Ton Schat directed attention to a dark ibis 
they found north of Armitage Rd, west of rt 38 north of Monezuma. I was birding 
nearby, and headed right over. I found the bird, but unfortunately the rain 
started in earnest right then, and the lighting was poor. Also the bird was 
very actively foraging in the far north end of the east-most section of flooded 
farm fields and did not give good looks.


White-faced and Glossy ibis are about equally likely to occur here. The bird 
looked like a non-breeding-plumaged adult, with no white on the face to help 
with ID (broad white in White-faced, thin white stripes in Glossy). It was way 
too far away, and the light was way too dim for me to be able to see if there 
was any red in the face or not. I could not tell which species it was.


Unless someone else gets better looks or better photos, I have to put it down 
as "Plegadis sp." or "Glossy/White-faced Ibis."


Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Where are all my feeder birds

2017-10-18 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
This seems to be a widespread phenomenon. There is just so much food in the 
woods right now, with huge crops of seeds and fruits that the birds don’t need 
our feeders. They’ll be back.

Kevin McGowan

From: bounce-121960930-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121960930-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of debby mcnaughton
Sent: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 1:08 PM
To: Catherine Cooke 
Cc: Barbara B. Eden ; Donna Lee Scott ; 
CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Where are all my feeder birds

I live in Canandaigua and the same thong here, very few birds compared to last 
year. The sunflower seeds have been hardly touched by the few chickadees, 
nuthatch and some gold finches.

On Oct 18, 2017 1:05 PM, "Catherine Cooke" 
> wrote:
I notice the same thing at my apartment at North Woods.
I filled my seed feeder up a few weeks ago and have had very few visitors.  
Usually, it is empty in a few days.
But the Downy Woodpeckers are still coming to my suet feeders, but not as 
frequently.
I have not seen a squirrel in a long time.

Cathy Cooke

On Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 12:53 PM, Donna Lee Scott 
> wrote:
Same here on Lansing Station Rd.
Few feeder birds, last few weeks, & no squirrels, when I usually have 10.
I thought this might be due to birds & SQs finding seeds & nuts from fall 
harvest in plants/trees nearby.

However, this morning I heard a "dawn chorus" in woods across street. Mostly 
Blue Jays I think.
Many come to my seeds on ground.

Donna Scott
Lansing
Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 18, 2017, at 12:47 PM, Barbara B. Eden 
> wrote:
For the past 2 months the resident birds that I daily feed have dropped in 
population This is the first time this has happened and even those pesky 
squirrels have left I live in Cayuga Heights and my backyard is a bird friendly 
habitat
Any thoughts would be appreciated
Thanks
Barbara Eden

Sent using OWA for iPhone
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Re:[cayugabirds-l] Warblers in sapsucker

2017-08-29 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
There has been a good flock of migrants near the footbridge on Wilson Trail 
North for the past two days. Mostly one or two of each species, but include

Northern Waterthrush

Black-and-white Warbler

Common Yellowthroat

American Redstart

CAPE MAY WARBLER

Magnolia Warbler

BAY-BREASTED WARBLER

Blackburnian Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Chestnut-sided Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Canada Warbler

WILSON'S WARBLER


Kevin


From: bounce-121771346-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Rebecca Hansen 

Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 4:57 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Warblers in sapsucker

Magnolia, Black-and-white, ,and Canada Warblers just now on the north side of 
Wilson Trail

Sent from my iPhone
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hungry youngsters!

2017-08-01 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Do they call at 5 in the morning? That's what my local crows do. I love crows, 
as most people know, but I'd rather they weren't so vocal so early.


Just a note on the crow breeding season this year. Good number of breeding 
families after a big hit from West Nile virus in 2012&2013. Earliest ever WNV 
positive deaths this year, but not much since the first of May. But, now is the 
traditional time for WNV to hit hard, the hot days of late summer. We know that 
WNV is here, so the state isn't too interested in testing crows or other birds 
that you might find dead in your yard (just bury them). But, if it's a dead 
tagged or banded crow, please, please do let me know. We (the Crow Research 
Group) are still trying to track death and survival of crows as best we can.


We tagged this year's cohort with orange tags with black letters. Some people 
seem to be seeing the tags as red, so be open for that. Any sightings would be 
most appreciated.


Best,


Kevin



Best,


Kevin


From: bounce-121694030-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Geo Kloppel 

Sent: Tuesday, August 1, 2017 5:08 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hungry youngsters!

Lots of hungry young birds around, but I especially feel for this fledgling 
Broad-winged Hawk, whose wails are not only piteous (all Broad-wings sound that 
way to me) but also right in my ears, because the bird favors the trees that 
shade my workshop.

Most years the Broad-wing fledglings take up begging stations several hundred 
yards away, overlooking secluded Maple Avenue, where their parents hunt, but 
this year is different for some reason...

-Geo
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[cayugabirds-l] local birds

2017-07-29 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
There hasn't been much local birding information on this list for a while. I 
admit that I'm as guilty as anyone of not posting my sightings. I get most of 
my "hot bird info" from my hourly email eBird "needs list" updates for the 
county. It's an awesome tool, but it's not as friendly as CayugaBirds. (Just as 
an aside, Steve Kelling created both of these forums!!)


So, here are some of my recent observations and thoughts.


There are lots of baby birds out there right now. I'm hearing hatch-year bird 
calls everywhere I go. Also, young warblers seem to be on the move right now. 
We've had lots of young Yellow Warblers around the Lab trails this week, and 
most of there were NOT produced on the local grounds. This was an oddly 
Yellow-Warbler-free year in Sapsucker Woods. As far as I know, there were NO 
breeding pairs around the Lab pond this year. So it seems that newly-produced 
warblers are dispersing. I had some nice encounters with hatch-year Blue-winged 
and Chestnut-sided warblers today, and I heard young warbler chips and zeeps in 
lots of places while driving around town.


My weekly crow census at the Cornell compost facility on Stevenson Rd turned up 
a single Herring Gull amongst the approximately 500 Ring-billed Gulls (only 
present in the last few weeks). Also, a single SOLITARY SANDPIPER foraging 
along the drainage ponds. A PEREGRINE FALCON of undetermined age (man, they fly 
fast!!) came through and flushed just about everything.


A few shorebirds are being reported at Myers Point, and a respectable report of 
the transitional male RUFF came in this week from the main drive at Montezuma.  
So, get out there and find some birds. And let us know what you find.


Kevin


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbird!!!

2017-07-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I've had normal hummingbird traffic at my feeder this year (and, in fact, need 
to refill it soon). There's one at it right now as I type!


What I've been having that is a bit out of the ordinary is that I've been 
swarmed by Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and Purple Finches all summer. I am now 
getting juveniles of both species hitting the feeders pretty hard. Just now, 
there were just at least 6 Purple Finches sitting on the single feeder. There 
was one adult male and 5 stripey ones that I suspect are juveniles.


They've been going through half a feeder of sunflower seeds each day. The 
flying-squirrels clean out whatever is left each night.


Kevin



From: bounce-121683736-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Whitings 

Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2017 6:16 PM
To: Rustici, Marc
Cc: Melanie Uhlir; W Larry Hymes; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbird!!!

I have maintained a feeder all summer too with no results until yesterday when 
my husband saw one there briefly. We never seem to have any despite many 
plantings for them until August or when the Bee Balm and Rose of Sharon are 
flowering so I guess it is on time for our yard.

Diana

dianawhitingphotography.com


> On Jul 27, 2017, at 5:03 PM, Rustici, Marc  wrote:
>
> I have heard that you need more than one feeder or food source to 
> consistently attract hummingbirds.  Do you have two sources of food for them 
> or is my information incorrect?
>
> Thanks
> Marc
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-121683513-62610...@list.cornell.edu 
> [mailto:bounce-121683513-62610...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Melanie Uhlir
> Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2017 4:46 PM
> To: W. Larry Hymes; cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Hummingbird!!!
>
> For a while the only evidence I had that hummingbirds were around was that 
> the nectar level would drop in the feeders. However, woodpeckers like to 
> drink the nectar too. But since my monarda started blooming I've been seeing 
> them on a more regular basis and the past few days I've seen two at a time, 
> chasing each other. I haven't seen an adult male for a few days. A 
> hummingbird moth has joined in the monarda celebration.
>
> Melanie
>
>> On 7/27/2017 3:21 PM, W. Larry Hymes wrote:
>> As we were talking with our son Chris in our living room on Tuesday,
>> he exclaimed excitedly, "A hummingbird just came to your feeder!!"  It
>> moved out of sight, but soon returned.  We had not seen one at our
>> feeders since May 11
>> I've written about this phenomenon before.  To paraphrase the "Field
>> of Dreams" movie, when he's here, the birds will come! This is
>> probably purely a matter of coincidence.   HOWEVER,  it has happened
>> enough times before to make me suspect that perhaps other "forces" may
>> be at play.
>>
>> Have others of you been seeing hummingbirds of late?  If not, maybe I
>> could send our son to your house!
>>
>> Larry
>>
>>
>
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Hooded Warbler south end of Yellow Barn Rd

2017-05-12 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Finally, a warbler! I had a beautiful male HOODED WARBLER on the south end of 
Yellow Barn Rd on my way home this evening. It was singing across the road from 
the shooting range at the sportsman's club.

We just finished the 6th (of 7) week of warbler ID webinars last night, and I 
still haven't seen more than two warblers together in one spot. What an odd 
spring.

Kevin


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Further info Yellow House Finch

2017-05-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Right. These feathers will last until the next molt, but if the bird is getting 
a better diet then, it will grow in more red ones. But, it's stuck with these 
yellow ones until the next molt, probably the end of the summer.


Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452



From: Linda Orkin <wingmagi...@gmail.com>
Sent: Friday, May 5, 2017 6:17 PM
To: Kevin J. McGowan
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L; W Larry Hymes
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Further info Yellow House Finch

I would imagine no one can be surprised at poor condition in these birds this 
year with the dearth of carotenoid source fruits and berries over this past 
fall and winter. This would not be permanent but could be corrected with better 
diet, correct Kevin?

Thx

Linda Orkin

Sent from my iPhone

On May 5, 2017, at 5:23 PM, Kevin J. McGowan 
<k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>> wrote:


No, the most likely explanation is that it is a young male in relatively poor 
condition. The captive experiments showed that poor diet makes for more yellow 
and less red birds. Those ideas apply to wild birds, as well. Yellowish House 
Finches are relatively common. I usually see a few each year.


But, since you brought up the topic. I had occasion the other day to see the 
same phenomenon (I am guessing) in PURPLE Finches, which I don't think I've 
ever seen before. Photos of a yellowish male coming to my feeder can be seen at 
https://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35976663.


Best,


Kevin



Kevin J. McGowan
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



From: 
bounce-121504884-3493...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-121504884-3493...@list.cornell.edu>
 
<bounce-121504884-3493...@list.cornell.edu<mailto:bounce-121504884-3493...@list.cornell.edu>>
 on behalf of W. Larry Hymes <w...@cornell.edu<mailto:w...@cornell.edu>>
Sent: Friday, May 5, 2017 4:53 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Further info Yellow House Finch

Upon reading the literature, it appears that captive house finches can
have yellow coloration because of the lack of carotenoids in their
diet.  Would the most likely explanation for this particular bird be
that it escaped from captivity?

Larry

--


W. Larry Hymes
120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
(H) 607-277-0759, w...@cornell.edu<mailto:w...@cornell.edu>



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[cayugabirds-l] Red-necked Grebes on Dryden Lake

2017-05-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Chris Wood found three breeding-plumaged Red-necked Grebes on Dryden Lake 
today, on a perfect "Dryden Lake day," with cold winds and rain in May. They 
were still present at about 4:00 pm this afternoon. Also, Bank, Barn, and Tree 
swallows circling low over the water in good numbers, also, totally typical for 
a day like today.


Kevin


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Prairie Warbler???

2017-04-20 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
A number of people had Northern Parula today, so consider that, too.

Kevin

From: bounce-121451829-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121451829-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Geo Kloppel
Sent: Thursday, April 20, 2017 10:52 AM
To: Karen Steffy ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Prairie Warbler???

Hi Karen,

Field Sparrow can give that impression, because its song too is delivered in 
accelerando, sometimes even with a slight rise in pitch. If you have the 
Audubon Birds app, you can compare Track #3 for both species to see what I mean.
-Geo

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 20, 2017, at 10:13 AM, Karen Steffy 
> wrote:
I heard the ascending sound of what I think is a prairie warbler this morning, 
but it seems early.  Is there a bird that has a similar song to a prairie 
warbler?

Karen

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[cayugabirds-l] Red flickers in New York

2017-04-15 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I didn't see John's reported Red-shafted Flicker, and therefore cannot comment 
definitively, but to my knowledge, there are no confirmed occurrences of the 
Red-shafted form of Northern Flicker in New York, or of actual hybrids of 
Red-shafted X Yellow-shafted birds or "intergrades."


But, there are plenty of flickers with red in their flight feathers. They have 
nothing to do with the western form of flicker. Instead, they're an 
increasingly common result of the environmentally-caused changes in birds 
resulting from the spread of exotic honeysuckles. It's the same phenomenon that 
creates orange tail tips in Cedar Waxwings.


See the recently published article, based in part on specimens in the Cornell 
University Museum of Vertebrates that I helped prepare over the last 30 years:

 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1642/AUK-16-63.1
Hudon, et al. 2017
Diet explains red flight feathers in Yellow-shafted Flickers in eastern North 
America


IMHO, it's more interesting than a wayward migrant out of range!


Best,


Kevin



From: bounce-121435790-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of John Confer 

Sent: Saturday, April 15, 2017 1:42 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Red-tail incubating


The red-tail is in a nest near the top of tall White Pine in East Lawn 
Cemetery, about 100 m north of the nearest edge of hawthorn orchard, and about 
40 m up main entrance into cemetery from MItchell Rd.


I walked through the area because of a Merlin nest two years ago, and hoping 
for another. Now that there is a nesting red-tail, I'm pretty sure that the 
red-tail would eat the Merlin, particularly a bird on the nest while 
incubating, and that there would never be a Merlin nest there.


Win some, loose some.


Good birding


PS. This morning I saw a Red-shafted Flicker in the City Cemetery (west of 
North Campus) near the center from east to west but on the southern edge. 
Probably a migrant, but it could stay around for a while. Incidentally, I 
didn't hear/see a Merlin although Andy Zepp has been hearing one in that 
location.

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[cayugabirds-l] White-crowned Sparrows at Game Farm

2017-01-21 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Because of the lack of dorm waste over the Cornell break, there are still no 
gulls (or Fish Crows) to speak of at the Stevenson Road compost facility.  But, 
during my weekly census of tagged American Crows, I was able to find FOUR 
juvenile WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS in the American Tree Sparrow flock along the 
entrance road (just past the back gate to the game farm; where the weeds meet 
the trees). I only rarely find an individual of this species before the main 
migration wave hits in May (even though they winter downstate and in 
Pennsylvania), so finding four was a bit of a surprise. Although I think Jay 
and Ken had multiple individuals in December.


Also present along the drive was the continuing leucistic Northern Mockingbird 
with some big white patches on its head, and a couple of very dark Red-tailed 
Hawks. Probably the hypothetical "abietcola" "eastern boreal form," one in 
particular has a very plain dark back with nearly no white spotting on the 
scapulars, and a Rough-legged Hawk-like complete dark belly band. I struggled 
to get some bad digiscoping photos of it perched, and then it flew around and 
around over my head to let me take over 300 SLR shots. I will post some when I 
can coordinate my two computer systems.


Kevin


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452

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[nysbirds-l] Seneca Falls birds: Snowy Owl and four swan species

2017-01-07 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I went to Seneca Falls today, as did a number of other birders, looking for 
Snowy Owls and hoping for Gyrfalcon. So far as I know, no one has refound the 
Gyrfalcon seen on Thursday.

I managed to find only one Snowy Owl today. It was a sparsely-marked individual 
with deep blackish markings and plenty of bars in the tail. Adult female? It 
was perched on the highest possible perch to oversee the area, on the top of a 
grain elevator complex west of Rt 414, near the windmill, west of Lott Farm 
fairgrounds and well west of the airport.


I heard that a Snowy was seen east of the Finger Lakes Regional Airport runways 
at some point, but I didn't see it. Best birds I had during several loops 
around the airport were a male Northern Harrier on Thorpe Road, and at least 
one Lapland Longspur in a Horned Lark flock I was told about on Hoster Rd south 
of Stahl Rd in a manure spread.


There was open water along the southern end of Lower Lake Road SE of Seneca 
Falls on Cayuga Lake, and there were lots of swan there. Most were Tundra 
Swans, of course, but I was quite surprised to see a pair of BLACK SWANS 
swimming off the ice edge at the far southern end of the road. They're kind of 
unmistakable, being huge waterbirds with long, gracefully curving necks, red 
bills, and all black body plumage. But, seeing as how they are native to 
Australia, there is zero chance they were wild vagrants. They're popular in 
captivity, and I don't know of any established feral populations around. I 
looked for, but did not see, their white wingtips (all swans have white 
wingtips; the only non-domestic waterfowl that do, with one half of an 
exception), so I can't say if they were free-flying or wing-clipped. Totally 
cool, though. Their presence, along with the couple of thousand Tundra Swans 
made me want to find Mute and Trumpeter swans too to get my very first 4-swan 
day. I wasn't doing a great job of parsing the waterfowl, but fortunately I 
talked to my son, Jay, and his birding group, and they had in fact seen some 
Mute Swans and a single wing-tagged Trumpeter along the road. With their tip, I 
found a pair of Mutes and the wing-tagged juvenile Trumpeter to complete my 
four swan day. I don't know when to ever expect that to happen again!


Just for the record, I do keep track of the free-flying exotic birds I see 
(including in the Basin, Bar-headed Goose, Egyptian Goose, Red-crested Pochard, 
and Eurasian Goldfinch). Fortunately, so does eBird! I won't count Black Swan 
on my year Basin list, but I do want to know when and where I saw it. Some of 
these exotics actually get established and become "countable" birds. I like to 
know where I first saw things like Monk Parakeet (Yellow Springs, Ohio) and 
Eurasian Collared-Dove (Marathon Key, Florida).


Happy birding new year.


Kevin


Kevin McGowan

Ithaca




From: bounce-121130380-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Marty Schlabach 

Sent: Saturday, January 7, 2017 6:28 PM
To: Laura Stenzler; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: RE:[cayugabirds-l] Snowy at Lott farm

I forgot to mention that the reason we were in the area was to stop at Hoover's 
kitchen cabinet shop, across the road from the airport.  In conversation with 
the cabinetmaker, I asked if he had seen a snowy owl in the area.  He looked 
sort of surprised, and then realized that's why all the cars were driving 
slowly around the area.  He saw people with binoculars, but he said he thought 
they were coyote hunters.  It didn't seem right to him, since coyote hunters 
usually drive pickup trucks with their dogs in the back, but most of the 
vehicles were cars, SUVs or crossovers.  He'll now be on the lookout for a 
snowy.

--Marty

-Original Message-
From: Marty Schlabach
Sent: Friday, January 6, 2017 8:43 PM
To: Laura Stenzler ; CAYUGABIRDS-L 

Subject: RE: Snowy at Lott farm

We were there about 4:30pm today.  We didn't spend much time looking, but 
didn't see a snowy at the airport, but did see one perched on top of the grain 
bins at the Lott farm along rt 414.  We did see a male northern harrier near 
the airport.

--Marty (& Mary Jean)
===
Marty Schlabach   m...@cornell.edu
8407 Powell Rd. home  607-532-3467
Interlaken, NY 14847   cell315-521-4315
===



-Original Message-
From: bounce-121128532-3494...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121128532-3494...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Laura Stenzler
Sent: Friday, January 6, 2017 1:08 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Snowy at Lott farm

We saw one snowy owl at the Lott farm around noon today. Nothing at the airport 
on Martin Rd and no Gyrfalcon. Alas.

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
--

Cayugabirds-L List 

[cayugabirds-l] Gyrfalcon info

2017-01-06 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I just heard secondhand that a falconer working at Seneca Meadows Landfill said 
the Gyrfalcon seen yesterday at the Finger Lakes Regional Airport is not theirs.

Kevin


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon

2017-01-06 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Gyrfalcons come in a variety of colors, from nearly pure, Snowy Owl white with 
scattered dark feather edging, to nearly all sooty black, usually with some 
light streaking and spotting on the chest and belly. David's bird fits cleanly 
in the middle, with dusky gray back and face and mostly pale underside. That is 
what is currently known as "gray," and is the most common form to reach our 
area. In fact, I've personally never seen anything except Gyrfalcons colored 
like this.


I hope it sticks around.


Kevin



From: John and Sue Gregoire <k...@empacc.net>
Sent: Friday, January 6, 2017 7:23 AM
To: Asher Hockett
Cc: Kevin J. McGowan; k...@empacc.net; Caroline Manring; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon

Dorsal appearance plays in that call Asher, and I believe from Dave K's photo 
that
this is a dark phase. All three appear light on the ventral side with the 
beautiful
white gyr a real eye stopper.

Many years ago (late 70s I think) we enjoyed all three at one time at a quarry 
in SE
Pennsylvania. Caravans of birders racing through Amish country was something the
locals surely still talk about.

We also remembered one (I think it was a gray) here up at Canoga marsh back 
around
the time when Andy Farnsworth was a student here and several members of the bird
club were able to see it hunt. Andy's sharp eyes spotted it while the rest of us
stared at blank sky for quite awhile.

John

--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
[http://empacc.net/%7Ekestrelhaven/RTHAHY-FrontPImagePIC.jpg]<http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/>

Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory Burdett New 
York<http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/>
www.empacc.net
Connected with the Finger Lakes National Forest and a large hemlock wetland, 
this 60-acre sanctuary is known as Kestrel Haven Avian Migration ...


"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Thu, January 5, 2017 15:58, Asher Hockett wrote:
> And the photo from Thorpe Rd is? I am confused because it seems very white,
> where it isn't spotted, and not gray at all.
>
> Asher not-very-experienced-with Gyrfalcons
>
> On Thu, Jan 5, 2017 at 2:54 PM, Kevin J. McGowan <k...@cornell.edu> wrote:
>
>> I believe that is true.
>>
>> Kevin
>>
>> -Original Message-
>> From: John and Sue Gregoire [mailto:k...@empacc.net]
>> Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 2:45 PM
>> To: Kevin J. McGowan <k...@cornell.edu>
>> Cc: Caroline Manring <carolinemanr...@gmail.com>; CAYUGABIRDS-L <
>> cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
>> Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon
>>
>> What color phase is the landfill Gyr? Thought it was a gray.
>> --
>> John and Sue Gregoire
>> Field Ornithologists
>> Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
>> 5373 Fitzgerald Road
>> Burdett,NY 14818-9626
>> N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
>>  Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
>> "Conserve and Create Habitat"
>>
>> On Thu, January 5, 2017 13:42, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
>> > Check the legs for jesses. They use a Gyrfalcon to keep gulls away
>> > from the landfill over on Rt 414.
>> >
>> > Kevin
>> >
>> > -Original Message-
>> > From: bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu
>> > [mailto:bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of
>> > Caroline Manring
>> > Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 1:32 PM
>> > To: CAYUGABIRDS-L <cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
>> > Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon
>> >
>> > Here now, 1:30-- no snowies to be seen but several good long looks at
>> > a Gyrfalcon on both sides of the road, both on ground and on telephone
>> pole!
>> >
>> > Caroline
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPhone
>> > --
>> >
>> > Cayugabirds-L List Info:
>> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
>> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
>> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave
>> > .htm
>> >
>> > ARCHIVES:
>> > 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
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>> > 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
>> >
>> > Please submit your observations to eBird:
>> > http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>> >
>> > --
>> >
>> >
>> > --
>&g

RE: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon

2017-01-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I believe that is true.

Kevin

-Original Message-
From: John and Sue Gregoire [mailto:k...@empacc.net] 
Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 2:45 PM
To: Kevin J. McGowan <k...@cornell.edu>
Cc: Caroline Manring <carolinemanr...@gmail.com>; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
<cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon

What color phase is the landfill Gyr? Thought it was a gray.
--
John and Sue Gregoire
Field Ornithologists
Kestrel Haven Avian Migration Observatory
5373 Fitzgerald Road
Burdett,NY 14818-9626
N 42 26.611' W 76 45.492'
 Website: http://www.empacc.net/~kestrelhaven/
"Conserve and Create Habitat"

On Thu, January 5, 2017 13:42, Kevin J. McGowan wrote:
> Check the legs for jesses. They use a Gyrfalcon to keep gulls away 
> from the landfill over on Rt 414.
>
> Kevin
>
> -Original Message-
> From: bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu
> [mailto:bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of 
> Caroline Manring
> Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 1:32 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L <cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
> Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon
>
> Here now, 1:30-- no snowies to be seen but several good long looks at 
> a Gyrfalcon on both sides of the road, both on ground and on telephone pole!
>
> Caroline
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> --
>
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon

2017-01-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Check the legs for jesses. They use a Gyrfalcon to keep gulls away from the 
landfill over on Rt 414.

Kevin

-Original Message-
From: bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-121125912-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Caroline Manring
Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2017 1:32 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Thorpe road Gyrfalcon

Here now, 1:30-- no snowies to be seen but several good long looks at a 
Gyrfalcon on both sides of the road, both on ground and on telephone pole!

Caroline

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[cayugabirds-l] banded Herring Gull

2016-12-24 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I took some photos of a first cycle Herring Gull at the Cornell compost 
facility on 10 December, 2016, and I just found out it was banded as a chick 28 
June 2016 on the roof of the Portland Art Museum in downtown, Portland, Maine, 
by Dr. Noah Perlut of the University of New England. It's always interesting to 
know where our winter visitors come from.


Photos of the bird are in my eBird list at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32947117. Six gull species there that 
day.


HH


Kevin



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[cayugabirds-l] turkey vulture with white in wings

2016-12-13 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
The pied Turkey Vulture I saw today looks very much like one I photographed 
last year in November 2015.

Here is today's checklist with photos:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33000639


And here is a checklist from 21 November 2015:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33003023


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



Do you know about our other distance-learning opportunities? Visit Bird 
Academy<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/>, 
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/courses/  to see our list of courses, and  
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/courses/home  to learn about our series of 
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 Purchase them here<http://store.birds.cornell.edu/category_s/31.htm>.




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[cayugabirds-l] Turkey Vulture with white in wings

2016-12-13 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
While taking a walk at lunch through Sapsucker woods I saw a Turkey Vulture 
circling over the pond. On close inspection, I saw it had big white patches in 
the tips of the wings. I put photographs in my checklist at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S33000639.

I haven't looked to compare it with photos of a similar bird we were seeing a 
year of two ago, but it looked very similar.

Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452



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[cayugabirds-l] Black Scoters on Dryden Lake

2016-12-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
There are currently two female Black Scoters swimming and sleeping on Dryden 
Lake. Canada Geese and Hooded Mergansers are the only other things I see. 

Kevin

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] migrating crows

2016-11-07 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Interesting report. American Crows are migrating right now, with lots of birds 
coming through from Ontario and Quebec. They are daytime migrants. It can be 
difficult to tell them from local roost movements, because migrants will stop 
and forage a while in a field with locals before heading out again.

Oddly, perhaps, crows in eastern North America don't fly south, they fly 
southwest. Some of our Ithaca-raised crows turn up in southwestern Pennsylvania 
and West Virginia, and other that we have banded in Ithaca in winter turn up in 
Montreal and Vermont.

Best,

Kevin


From: bounce-120971067-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120971067-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Dave Nutter
Sent: Sunday, November 06, 2016 8:42 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] migrating crows

Today I saw something I don't recall seeing before. Many times I have seen 
crows commuting - traveling away from a large roost early in the morning or 
returning to the roost area in the afternoon. Today at 11am I saw a flock of 
125 crows flying south high over the east end of Stewart Park. I suspect they 
were migrating. This was not the time of day I that crows typically commute. 
Their flight path was the same that I have seen used by migrating Blue Jays 
earlier in the autumn when they follow the east side of the lake 
south-southeast but then take a more accurate southerly course once they can do 
so over without flying over the lake. They were taking some advantage of the 
north-northwest wind, but when I saw them they were flying at an angle to it.  
These crows were silent, but I assume they were American Crows because they 
appeared similar to each other in size and I doubt we could assemble that many 
Fish Crows here.

--Dave Nutter
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Snowy Owl - NOT

2016-10-26 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Just got a call from Anne Clark at the scene. Apparently the bird is a mostly 
white Red-tailed Hawk, although it has a red tail. Last seen south of Fall 
Creek Rd, where the stream crosses the road.

Kevin

-Original Message-
From: bounce-120934548-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120934548-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of AB Clark
Sent: Wednesday, October 26, 2016 9:38 AM
To: W Larry Hymes 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Snowy Owl

That would be just E of Ed Hill Rd, on Fall Creek rd.  Heading out there now.  
Don't be fooled by the wooden sculptured owl that is on the right, leaving 
Freeville, going E.

Anne

> On Oct 26, 2016, at 9:33 AM, W. Larry Hymes  wrote:
> 
> Just got a call from the manager of the Thompson Veg. Research Farm that a 
> SNOWY OWL is hanging around the farm.  The farm is just outside Freeville on 
> the road that goes to McClean.  It was last seen in a cherry tree on the 
> south side of the road near Fall Creek.  Isn't this way early
> 
> Larry
> 
> -- 
> 
> 
> W. Larry Hymes
> 120 Vine Street, Ithaca, NY 14850
> (H) 607-277-0759, w...@cornell.edu
> 
> 
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Eagle Question

2016-09-28 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Hey, life is tough. And, apparently, learning to be an effective predator is 
harder than learning to eat fruit. It's HARD to learn how to kill things 
efficiently, especially if they're not just insects or mice and might fight 
back.


Perhaps my most poignant thought about the difficulties of growing up to be a 
predator was when someone brought in a juvenile Northern Goshawk to the Cornell 
collections when I was the curator. It was clearly emaciated and had starved to 
death. The donator said that it had been stalking her chickens for weeks, but 
that when it tried to attack them her rooster beat the crap out of it, and it 
had been sitting on the chicken house staring down at the chickens for a week 
or two before it died.


Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Instructor
Home Study Course in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edu
607-254-2452

From: bounce-120838375-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
<bounce-120838375-3493...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Candace Cornell 
<cec...@gmail.com>
Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2016 9:37:37 PM
To: Peter; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Eagle Question

About 60-70% of young eagles perish in their first year primarily due to 
starvation, although collisions, electrocutions, and other dangers also befall 
them. Young eagles have a long adolescence to learning to hunt for themselves 
and it is a steep learning curve. Birds that are slow to learn do not make it. 
From what I've read, 10-20% survive to maturity.

Candace

On Wed, Sep 28, 2016 at 7:23 PM, Peter 
<psara...@rochester.rr.com<mailto:psara...@rochester.rr.com>> wrote:
Howdy folks.

Am reading a very interesting, creative book by Pete Dunne called "The Wind 
MastersThe Lives Of North American Birds of Prey". Dunne takes a very 
creative approach to teach us about these birds...the book reads more like a 
novel!  I highly recommend it but have a question.

In his piece about Bald Eagles, Pete says that, with respect to young eagles, 
more than 90% that fledge in a given season don't survive to adulthood, and 
nearly 60% of these die during their first year. Evidently, to quote Dunne, 
"starvation is a young eagle's greatest adversary"..

I was wondering what anyone thought about his statistics.

Thanks for the feedback.

Pete Saracino





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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Eagle Question

2016-09-28 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Sounds about right. I'd have to check the BNA account tomorrow at work to 
verify the numbers, but that seems in the ballpark.


For medium-sized songbirds, like robins and Red-winged Blackbirds, 70% of nests 
fail to produce any fledglings, 92% of those fledglings die over the first 
year, and half of all adults die each year.


Larger birds tend to have higher yearly survival, but they take longer to reach 
maturity, too. For American Crows, roughly just over half of the nests produce 
fledglings, half of those survive their first year, but most don't breed until 
they're 4 years old, and it's 15% mortality each year. Bald Eagles don't breed 
until they're 5 or so, so I would expect numbers something Pete quotes.


It's a rough world out there. That's one of the reasons that natural selection 
is so strong at weeding out "frivolous" behavior.


Kevin


From: bounce-120838092-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Peter 

Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2016 7:23:58 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Eagle Question

Howdy folks.

Am reading a very interesting, creative book by Pete Dunne called "The
Wind MastersThe Lives Of North American Birds of Prey". Dunne takes
a very creative approach to teach us about these birds...the book reads
more like a novel!  I highly recommend it but have a question.

In his piece about Bald Eagles, Pete says that, with respect to young
eagles, more than 90% that fledge in a given season don't survive to
adulthood, and nearly 60% of these die during their first year.
Evidently, to quote Dunne, "starvation is a young eagle's greatest
adversary"..

I was wondering what anyone thought about his statistics.

Thanks for the feedback.

Pete Saracino





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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Red Breasted Nuthatches

2016-09-19 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Red-breasted Nuthatches are periodically irruptive species out of the boreal 
forest. They tend to go south months before other irruptives, usually first 
showing up in August. It looks like this is going to be an irruption year.

From: bounce-120802766-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120802766-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Asher Hockett
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2016 10:01 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Red Breasted Nuthatches

Carol's post reminded me that we have had RB Nuthatches visiting our feeder for 
most of the summer. Lately it's been two (at least) at a time. These birds are 
not flustered in the slightest by my presence near the feeders. We take them 
down every night to discourage raccoon visits, and the nuthatches and 
chickadees will keep coming for seed even as I am taking the feeders off the 
hooks.

My guess is that the RB's like the Hemlock Forest we live in, as they were a 
rarity at Comfort Rd only 4 miles away, where we were on the edge of a mixed 
hardwood forest with a meadow adjoining.

We also still have Purple Finches and RB Grosbeaks daily, as well as the usual 
suspects including the audible local Ravens and Red-shouldered Hawks

--
asher
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Shorebirds and Others Tuesday July 5th 2016

2016-07-05 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
David,


Thanks for posting. Glad you got a decent photo of the Tundra Swan. On 5 June 
2016, when I made the run for the Garganey, I saw a single swan in the marsh 
that I identified at the time as Tundra. Its eyes were too prominent for 
Trumpeter, in my opinion, but everyone else called it a Trumpeter. After 
discussion with my son, I downgraded my report to swan sp., citing lack of 
evidence. It was a long way away, I got no photos, and frankly, I was paying a 
lot more attention to looking for the rare duck. But, deep in my 
heart-of-hearts, I thought it was an out-of-place-and-time Tundra Swan.


This is not the first of the species to be recorded in the area over the 
summer, but it's still a pretty rare occurrence and worthy of note. How many 
other, probably young or injured, arctic-breeding waterfowl winter well south 
of the breeding grounds? Just like the White-winged Scoter observation and 
discussion on Long Island, if we pay enough attention we might find out some 
interesting new things.


Best,


Kevin


Kevin McGowan

Ithaca, NY



From: bounce-120607526-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of David Nicosia 

Sent: Tuesday, July 5, 2016 5:20 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L; NYSBIRDS-L; broomebi...@googlegroups.com
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Shorebirds and Others Tuesday July 5th 2016

Had the day off so went to Montezuma from mid morning to mid afternoon Today.
Even though the heat of summer continues to build fall shorebird migration has 
begun
as others have noted. Started at Knox-Marcellus Marsh from Towpath Rd. Road is 
dry so not
as bad but still very uneven with giant potholes ("pot"hole is an 
understatement in places!!!).

LESSER YELLOWLEGS have been very common. I estimated about 200 birds. There were
at least a few GREATER YELLOWLEGS but by far LESSER predominate. Also there were
several flocks of peeps with many hiding down low in the mud and emergent 
vegetation. They
were all LEAST SANDPIPERS except for 2 nice PECTORAL SANDPIPERS. I could have
missed others as there were so many distant birds. There were also many KILLDEER
some with young, at least 10 SPOTTED SANDPIPERS around, and 7 DOWITCHER sp.
that have been seen and IDed as Long-Billed. They were very distant for me as 
some looked
like they had that "hump" shape but again distance was my problem. I was able 
to digi-scope
these guys through my scope on 70X and got some poor images. If someone can 
point out
any discernable field marks on these dowitchers please share offline to my 
email address.
Photos are below.

The CASPIAN TERNS are increasing and at one point I had 22, 17 on the ground 
and 5 flying around.
There were 13 BLACK TERNS. I managed a nice photo of one in flight.

In addition to the shorebirds and terns, I had a TUNDRA SWAN!! This bird had a 
smaller more curved
bill, the eye was separate from the bill and most telling was a light yellow 
dot at the front of the eye!!
There was also a TRUMPETER SWAN for comparison. Additionally, the lingering 2 
SNOW GEESE
continue and I also had a male REDHEAD molting toward its eclipse plumage at 
Puddler's marsh
from Towpath road. Photos are below.

Wildlife drive was fairly quiet, lots of MARSH WRENS, the SOLITARY SANDPIPER is 
back in his spot
in that little stream before Larue's and Eaton Marsh has mainly LESSER 
YELLOWLEGS.

For my ebird lists see http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30543854

   
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30544721

For my photos of the day see...  
https://www.flickr.com/photos/davenicosia/albums/72157670005509232

Best,
Dave Nicosia

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[cayugabirds-l] Black-necked Stilt at Knox-Marcellus Marsh at Montezuma

2016-06-18 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
It doesn't look like this ever got posted on this list. This morning, Saturday, 
18 June 2016, Stacy Robinson was looking for the Garganey at Knox-Marsellus and 
found a Black-necked Stilt instead!!! Although the Garganey remained elusive 
and had not been seen by the time I left this afternoon, the stilt was seen 
throughout the day. When I was there just past noon, the looks were horrible 
because of the distance and heat shimmer. But, fortunately, a stilt is a giant 
shorebird that is boldly patterned in simple black and white, and so is easily 
identified with confidence from a great distance.

Although Black-necked Stilt is an expected vagrant along the New York coast, it 
is rare in the state even there. I haven't done the research, but I believe 
this may be the third upstate record of the species in New York and the first 
for the Cayuga Lake Basin. It certainly was a new state bird for me!

Kevin

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] B. Orioles in Trumbull Corners - SUET!

2016-05-10 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Interesting observation, Marie. I have a pair of orioles coming to my suet 
right now, and I have never experienced that before.

Kevin

-Original Message-
From: bounce-120469864-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120469864-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Marie P. Read
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2016 10:21 AM
To: Dave Gislason; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] B. Orioles in Trumbull Corners - SUET!

Hi Cayugabirders,

I think it's very interesting how people are reporting orioles eating suet this 
spring. Maybe this has been reported in previous years, but I don't recall so. 
I'm wondering whether this change in diet is because so few of the flowering 
trees are out (at least where I live and in the Cornell Plantations Arboretum 
where I spend a lot of time). So the orioles are having a hard time finding 
enough food (they like to sip nectar from tree flowers) . BTW, many of the 
crabapples in the Arboretum were nailed by the super-cold snap a few weeks 
back...I've been looking closely...there are few viable flower buds on many of 
them, and leaves just struggling to come out now. The trees up here seem 
awfully bare for mid-May.

Marie

Marie Read Wildlife Photography
452 Ringwood Road
Freeville NY  13068 USA

Phone  607-539-6608
e-mail   m...@cornell.edu

Website: http://www.marieread.com
Follow me on Facebook:  
https://www.facebook.com/Marie-Read-Wildlife-Photography-104356136271727/

From: bounce-120469816-5851...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-120469816-5851...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Dave Gislason 
[dgif...@yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2016 10:11 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] B. Orioles in Trumbull Corners

This morning my lone male Baltimore Oriole was joined by two others, plus two 
females. They love the suet.
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Re: [cayugabirds-l] feeder Raven

2016-05-01 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Awesome! I wish I had that as a feeder bird. I expect that if it wants the suet 
that badly that it will find a way to get it, provided it isn't scared away. I 
don't think ravens are as gymnastically, physically astute as gray squirrels, 
but if there's a will, there will be a way. If you want to encourage it to keep 
trying, why not hang a piece of raw bacon from the suet feeder into the raven's 
reach? Squirrels won't be interested in that.


Best (enviously),


Kevin



From: bounce-120439643-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
 on behalf of Asher Hockett 

Sent: Sunday, May 1, 2016 1:28 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] feeder Raven

We have had our feeder visited the past few days by a Raven. It appears he is 
trying to figure out how to get to the suet. There is no close perch so he sits 
on the railing which puts it about two inches out of his reach. Perhaps we'll 
scatter some peanuts or corn, but the squirrels may be a deterrent to that idea.

Anyway, it's really nice to get such close looks of this fascinating individual.

--
asher

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Pipit party at Myers

2016-04-03 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Also, vesper sparrow, Savannah sparrow, and SNIPES.

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 3, 2016, at 1:14 PM, "Kevin J. McGowan" 
<k...@cornell.edu<mailto:k...@cornell.edu>> wrote:


Dryden back road edges are covered in robins and pipits. Also savannah 
sparrows, killdeer, and a few flickers.
Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 3, 2016, at 12:55 PM, "David Nicosia" 
<daven102...@gmail.com<mailto:daven102...@gmail.com>> wrote:


American Pipits in many locales down here in Broome co too. Many close up.  
Must have been a big fallout of this species last night.

On Apr 3, 2016 10:51 AM, "Paul Anderson" 
<p...@grammatech.com<mailto:p...@grammatech.com>> wrote:
At Myer's Point just now, where the strong North wind is brutal, there was a 
remarkable number of American Pipits on the road along Salmon Creek leading up 
to the spit. I estimate at least fifty.

At Ladoga, where it was more sheltered but still unpleasant, - more Pipits! 
Eight on the road in, and another six or so by the shore. South of the shore 
was a flock of thirteen Red-breasted Mergansers. A flock of about twenty Tree 
Swallows were flying around by the docks. An Osprey was carrying nesting 
material.

I had come from leading the beginner bird walk at Sapsucker Woods where four 
visitors were brave enough to join. We encountered many flocks of Rusty 
Blackbirds, but it was impossible for me to tell for sure how many in total 
because they were moving around so much. I would guess about 20-30 individuals. 
My guests were happy to see their first Sapsucker ever.

-Paul

--
Paul Anderson, VP of Engineering, GrammaTech, Inc.
531 Esty St., Ithaca, NY 14850
Tel: +1 607 273-7340 x118<tel:%2B1%20607%20273-7340%20x118>; 
http://www.grammatech.com


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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Pipit party at Myers

2016-04-03 Thread Kevin J. McGowan

Dryden back road edges are covered in robins and pipits. Also savannah 
sparrows, killdeer, and a few flickers.
Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 3, 2016, at 12:55 PM, "David Nicosia" 
> wrote:


American Pipits in many locales down here in Broome co too. Many close up.  
Must have been a big fallout of this species last night.

On Apr 3, 2016 10:51 AM, "Paul Anderson" 
> wrote:
At Myer's Point just now, where the strong North wind is brutal, there was a 
remarkable number of American Pipits on the road along Salmon Creek leading up 
to the spit. I estimate at least fifty.

At Ladoga, where it was more sheltered but still unpleasant, - more Pipits! 
Eight on the road in, and another six or so by the shore. South of the shore 
was a flock of thirteen Red-breasted Mergansers. A flock of about twenty Tree 
Swallows were flying around by the docks. An Osprey was carrying nesting 
material.

I had come from leading the beginner bird walk at Sapsucker Woods where four 
visitors were brave enough to join. We encountered many flocks of Rusty 
Blackbirds, but it was impossible for me to tell for sure how many in total 
because they were moving around so much. I would guess about 20-30 individuals. 
My guests were happy to see their first Sapsucker ever.

-Paul

--
Paul Anderson, VP of Engineering, GrammaTech, Inc.
531 Esty St., Ithaca, NY 14850
Tel: +1 607 273-7340 x118; 
http://www.grammatech.com


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[cayugabirds-l] Local birding and amazing mockingbird

2016-03-26 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I was doing crow work today, which means nest finding (they started 
incubating!! All nest site information and activity reports are most welcome.), 
and had a few non-crow interesting observations to report.


I had FOX SPARROWS in three different locations today, so watch out for them. 
All locations were kind of random (Yellow Barn Rd, Hungerford Rd, McGowan Woods 
Rd), so look for them in good sparrow spots.


I was concentrating on crows at the Cornell compost on Stevenson Rd today, but 
still managed to find 4 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS mixed in with about 450 
Herring Gulls. I had one good candidate for Glaucous X Herring hybrid young 
gull, but honestly, I think all these big, flat-headed gulls with a bi-colored 
bill are just Herring Gulls. Good golly how Herring Gulls do vary!!   American 
Crow, Fish Crow, Common Raven, and Blue Jay made for an enjoyable 4-corvid 
checklist.


While watching a family of crows NOT go to their nest, I got distracted by a 
Northern Mockingbird singing from a hidden perch on McGowan Woods Rd, just off 
Palm Rd in the Cornell annex area, just east of the Cornell Orchards. The bird 
sang from concealment in vegetation, but he had an impressive list of 
imitations. I put the shorter of my two main recordings in my checklist at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S28560608. I recognized at least 16 
species. Can you identify more?


Enjoy spring!!


Kevin


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Possible leucistic Canada at SSW

2016-03-14 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Although the body shows some dark feather edging that resemble a Canada Goose, 
the thick neck with deep ridges in the feathers indicate this bird has domestic 
goose genes.

Kevin

From: bounce-120266252-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120266252-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kenneth V. 
Rosenberg
Sent: Monday, March 14, 2016 9:16 AM
To: edgarallenhoo...@gmail.com
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Possible leucistic Canada at SSW

I saw that goose by the horse farm on Blugrass Lane yesterday. Very large and 
whitish, but with some "wild-type" markings. Looked mostly domestic but 
obviously flying around with Canadas.

Ken

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 14, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Brad Walker 
> wrote:
Hi all,

There's a possible leucistic Canada Goose at Sapsucker Woods on the pond for 
those that want to take a look. It's either that or a domestic type.

Brad
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club March meeting - Mon., March 14

2016-03-14 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Apologies to the list.

Colleen,

Your email doesn't seem to be working. I was trying to RSVP for dinner, but it 
bounced twice.

Kevin

From: bounce-120261428-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120261428-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of cl...@juno.com
Sent: Friday, March 11, 2016 5:50 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Cayuga Bird Club March meeting - Mon., March 14


The March Cayuga Bird Club meeting will be this coming Monday, March 14,  at 
7:30 pm at the Cornell  Lab of Ornithology. Cookies & conversation begins at 
7:15.

  Our speaker, Anastasia Dalziell, from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, will be 
presenting "Strange Tales of a Curious Bird: Recent Research on the Superb 
Lyrebird".

The male Superb Lyrebird is world famous for its remarkable ability to mimic 
natural and human-made sounds. Postdoc Anastasia Dalziell traveled to the 
forests of southeastern Australia to study lyrebird mimicry and found that, 
contrary to early suggestions, male lyrebirds are highly selective about when 
and what sounds they mimic. She will also discuss the association between vocal 
mimicry and dance, along with other findings that challenge our understanding 
about the evolution of complex communication in animals.

Members are invited to dinner with Anastasia before the meeting at Aladdin's in 
Collegtown at 5:30. Please RSVP by noon Monday to 
cl...@juno.com so reservations can be made.

There will also be an opportunity at the meeting to sign up for tickets to the 
documentary, The Messenger, which will be shown at Cornell Cinema on Sunday, 
April 10th, at 4:30. Stay tuned for additional information.

Looking forward to seeing everyone at our Club meeting on Monday, March 14
Colleen Richards
Cayuga Bird Club
Corresponding Secretary
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] please keep reporting Western Tanager

2016-03-10 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Nice photos. I see no progression of molt from when I photographed the bird on 
27 Feb: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S27850362. Does anyone else 
see any changes?

Kevin

From: bounce-120254348-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120254348-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Elaina M. 
McCartney
Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2016 6:37 AM
To: Dave Nutter; CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] please keep reporting Western Tanager

The Western Tanager was enjoying the fruits of a tree in Wee Stinky Glen 
yesterday morning (March 9) shortly after 9 am, on a branch above the path that 
goes by the bench near the upper entrance of the Cornell Store.  A few photos:

https://flic.kr/p/EY3hcB
https://flic.kr/p/EY3j9H
https://flic.kr/p/EY3gEK
https://flic.kr/p/EDDnaL
https://flic.kr/p/F4V9qN
https://flic.kr/p/E9R1n6

When I first noticed it, I was drawn to look up by singing.  The Western 
Tanager was on a branch close to a House Finch.  A set of more photos is at 
https://www.flickr.com/photos/emccartney/albums/72157665124320010

Elaina

From: Dave Nutter >
Reply-To: Dave Nutter >
Date: Fri, 4 Mar 2016 21:42:39 -0500
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L 
>
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] please keep reporting Western Tanager

The WESTERN TANAGER is still being reported via eBird daily on Cornell 
University campus in the same area - the alcove at the east entrance to the 
underground Cornell Store (good for sunning and eating fruits of vines on the 
wall), the south and west sides of Day Hall (whose inhabitants put seed on the 
windowsills), the nearby stream known as Wee Stinky Glen and the fruiting trees 
over it, with forays to the south side of Sage Chapel.

Please keep reporting this bird. Also, any photographers or observers of 
detail, please let me know if you believe you are seeing progression of molt. 
I'd love to see the bird with more adult or breeding male characteristics such 
as red around the face or darker back feathers.

--Dave Nutter

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[cayugabirds-l] Glaucous Gull and hybrid at compost

2016-02-20 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Finally, I had an interesting gull at the compost in 2016. I've done 13 crow 
censuses out there this year, and have had lots of Herring and Great 
Black-backed gulls, but only a few individual Ring-billed Gulls and a 1cy 
Lesser Black-backed Gull to add to that. Today I had an adult GLAUCOUS GULL, 
first loafing in the field above the piles, then actively feeding on the piles. 
It's probably the same bird that I've seen at Stewart Park, and the same one 
that Jay saw at the compost in January. But, it's my first white-winged gull at 
the compost in 2016.

I also had what I believe to be a so-called "Nelson's Gull," a hybrid of 
Herring and Glaucous gull. It was a  2nd or 3rd cycle bird. Big, flat head, 
sharply bicolored bill. It had some mantle feathers coming in, which were 
whiter than surrounding Herring Gulls. Wing tips were dark but silverish with 
pale edges. Again lighter then nearby Herring Gulls. There are always Herring 
Gulls around that are very similar, including the non-black wingtips, but this 
one had mostly white tertials and greater secondary coverts that looked 
different. I found several 1st or 2nd cycle Herrings with similar coverts, but 
not the whole Glaucousy package.

Perhaps the coolest birds were the two immature BALD EAGLES that terrorized the 
compost crowd for a while. Both eagles were flying over at same time. Both very 
white in body and wings, one with a darker head. They were distinguishable, but 
they looked so much alike one wonders if they are siblings traveling together. 
We still have so much to learn about animal movements and associations!

Photos in the checklist at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S27703623.

Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Instructor
Home Study Course in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Ithaca, NY 14850
hst...@cornell.edu<mailto:hst...@cornell.edu>
607-254-2452


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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Lots 'O redtailed Hawks

2016-02-14 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
And an adult BALD EAGLE on the compost mounds at 2:00, then perched in the tree 
line above the compost for the next two hours.

The number of Red-tailed Hawks in that tree got to 25 while I was there. I 
spent too much time sitting still photographing two young hawks reluctantly 
"sharing" a recently killed pheasant to get an accurate count. But, I could see 
42 from that one spot, so I suspect Laura's number is more accurate than what I 
put in ebird.

Kevin


-Original Message-
From: bounce-120163494-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-120163494-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Laura Stenzler
Sent: Sunday, February 14, 2016 3:06 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Lots 'O redtailed Hawks

Hi,
I checked out the Cornell game farm on Stevenson and game farm roads this 
afternoon at 3 PM. I easily counted 62 Redtailed Hawks on the fences and in the 
trees. In the main big tree there were 22 hawks alone. Also loads of Starlings, 
eating the grain. 

Laura

Laura Stenzler
l...@cornell.edu
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[nysbirds-l] White Pelican reported in Syracuse

2016-01-12 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
A report just came in to the Lab of a WHITE PELICAN in the inner harbor in 
Syracuse, present for the last two hours.

Kevin J. McGowan


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[cayugabirds-l] Stevenson compost birds

2015-11-15 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I've been gone a week, but went out to the Cornell compost today to census 
crows and had a few noteworthy birds. In addition to the American and Fish 
crows I was seeking, I saw a single adult LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL and an 
unexpected first-cycle ICELAND GULL. The Iceland was very pale and quite small, 
a good head smaller than the Herring Gulls around it. White wingtips, pale 
back, short, all-black bill. No Franklin's Gull, although I was hoping to find 
one to make my 10th gull species there.

Most unusual bird was a very dark, western calurus-type Red-tailed Hawk. I 
looked up and saw it soaring over the compost, coming in from the north. It was 
an all dark hawk, with head, body, and underwings all dark; lighter, but not 
bright primaries and secondaries, and a lighter, red tail. I got it in my 
binoculars and whipped my car around to get a better look. It sailed high over 
the compost, then joined in with another Red-tailed Hawk (a normal, 
pale-bellied bird) and circled over the fields to the east. My first thought 
was western red-tail, but I  asked myself what was the most likely dark buteo? 
Rough-legged Hawk is the most common dark hawk around here, and it is getting 
on into late November, so that would have to be the most likely thing. But, the 
bird did not have white in the primaries or at the base of the tail, and when I 
got the scope on it, the tail was definitely red. As I watched in the scope it 
banked towards me as it soared in a circle, and the head and breast showed dark 
reddish, contrasting slightly with the darker belly and underwings. It looked 
like a typical dark western Red-tailed Hawk, with noticeable fine dark barring 
in the flight feathers and tail. It circled with the other Red-tail and a 
couple of Turkey Vultures, and then drifted off to the SE over Ellis Hollow. I 
got some photos and will post the best ones soon.

Other birds of notes were 40 Brown-headed Cowbirds and a Fox Sparrow.

Kevin

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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Cinnamon Teal

2015-11-02 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I don't think I agree. The pale face doesn't track a facial crescent like that 
of a Blue-winged Teal. If you look at the shape of it, the paleness is broadest 
at the forehead and at the throat. In contrast, a Blue-winged Teal has the 
broadest white behind the bill and almost nothing near the throat. To me, the 
indistinctly pale face and pale, not white, patch near the rump are easily 
matched by transitional male Cinnamon Teal with no need for hybrid ancestry 
hypothesis. There is no spotting on the sides visible in any photo yet posted 
other than the dark centers of eclipse feathers. Beautiful photos of an 
unmistakable Cinnamon X Blue-winged teal by Chris from a couple of years ago 
(can you post a link?) show a bird quite unlike this one, with lots of crisp 
spotting on side feathers, a facial pattern unlike this bird, and a clear white 
flank patch.

I have little experience with Cinnamon Teal at this time of year, but this bird 
is pretty comparable in terms of coloration with the couple of birds I've seen 
in Texas in November. The BNA account mentions that this species holds onto 
bits of eclipse plumage well through the fall, and doesn't get full, smooth 
breeding plumage until the spring. I need to look at more seasonal examples, 
but I don't see anything outside the range of normal Cinnamon Teal plumage that 
would convince me this is a hybrid yet.

Kevin

From: bounce-119851092-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119851092-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Christopher Wood
Sent: Monday, November 02, 2015 9:21 PM
To: Jay McGowan
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hybrid Blue-winged x Cinnamon Teal

Hi everyone,

I think all the traits that Jay points out are conclusive that this is a 
hybrid. There isn't a transitional plumage of Cinnamon Teal that would ever 
show this extent of a white facial crescent, spotting on the sides or this 
amount of white where the flanks meet the rump. The cinnamon coloration is also 
diluted and not as bright. These traits are the ones to look for on Cinnamon x 
Blue-winged hybrid - a bird that is much rarer than Cinnamon Teal (though 
perhaps not in NY).

Great find!

Chris Wood
Ithaca, NY


On Nov 2, 2015, at 1:37 PM, Jay McGowan 
> wrote:
The CINNAMON TEAL found yesterday is still being reported up to a few minutes 
ago. Some doubts continue, however, as to its purity as a few characters, 
including a pale face, some white on the flank, and indeterminately patterned 
sides may point to it being a Blue-winged x Cinnamon hybrid, but its 
transitional plumage make it hard to be sure. Higher resolution photos than we 
were able to obtain yesterday afternoon would be helpful to resolve this, so 
please post if you obtain any! For the moment, be warned that this is a 
possibility. Either way, this is a beautiful bird and well worth the trouble of 
going to look at.

Also, I just noticed this report of a Glossy Ibis from October 16th. It must 
not have come through on the eBird rare bird alert because it was submitted 
more than a week after the sighting took place. This is very unfortunate 
because, although the images are somewhat poor, the overall coloration looks 
very good for a WHITE-FACED IBIS:
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S25558704
This was obviously a while ago, but we should still keep an eye out for this 
bird in the refuge area.

--
Jay McGowan
Macaulay Library
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
jw...@cornell.edu
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma is great today!!! - out of car thread...

2015-10-18 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
From: Diana [mailto:whiti...@roadrunner.com] 
" Surely with so many places on the refuge where you can get out of the car, 
..."

Seriously? Where? You know the refuge. If you wanted to take a small group to 
see some birds, where would you go? Where could you get anywhere near close 
enough to anything interesting to engage a 10-year-old? The corral at Mays 
Point used to have birds, but there hasn't been habitat there for years. The 
towers and East Road have great stuff, but it's so far away you can't show a 
beginner anything. I'm a photographer and I take almost all of my photos from 
my car/blind. But, if we're talking education here, it just isn't happening.

For exposure to wildlife at all levels, access is key. Denying access to even a 
tiny sliver of the refuge serves no one's best interests, in my view. Blinds 
would be cool, and are used successfully all over the world, but they can't 
face south straight into the sun!

Kevin

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma is great today!!!

2015-10-18 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Snip: "The refuge grants this privilege - this break from the norm -  because 
it considers it an educational opportunity/event for the visiting public - one 
in which they can learn more about the refuge and the life it encourages. "

Every birder I know is more than happy to tell anyone who asks what they're 
looking at and what's cool about it. If everyone was allowed to stand outside 
their car, looking through their scopes, the dialog, conversation, and 
education would be constant, not just in special events.

Keeping the public in their vehicles decreases information flow and potentially 
decreases the overall enjoyment and education of the public passing through. As 
a compulsive educator, I find this stay-in-your-car! policy to be frustrating 
and counter-productive. I constantly find cool birds along the wildlife drive 
and hope someone will stop and ask me what I'm looking at. If I could, I'd get 
out of my car (on the passenger side) and flag people down to look at baby 
Virginia Rails or a Least Bittern.

But, I can't do that, because I follow rules. So, I turn around in my car seat 
and hope to make eye contact with other cars passing by. They can't see my 
face, and they all pass on by. If I was allowed to stand outside the car they 
could see me and the level of education that occurs along the drive would 
increase by more than an order of magnitude.

In my opinion.

Kevin


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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Cornell Community Gardens - imminent conversion, weekend walks, M-Th recap

2015-10-09 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I hope the trip goes well. I will be sad to see this garden leave this spot. 
Let’s hope it goes somewhere else. It used to be on Bluegrass Lane before 
Freese.

Pay special attention this weekend for a sparrow I observed very briefly 
Wednesday morning. It looked like a very streaky White-throated Sparrow, but it 
also had a dark malar stripe and outline of the white throat. From the few 
photos I got, it looks like it could be a White-throated X Song Sparrow hybrid. 
Look at the three photos at 
https://picasaweb.google.com/101683745969614096883/Fall2015.
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/lrv7eAW5CcD359-eKyXNZdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/1OYjJgcgM3rfsMK44YxZ3NMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/n0qvXNQwmPpzpn0aWKqx_9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

Also on my Picasa page I have a sequence of a Lincoln’s Sparrow fight I took 
this morning.

Best,

Kevin

From: bounce-119761615-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119761615-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Mark Chao
Sent: Friday, October 09, 2015 1:17 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Cornell Community Gardens - imminent conversion, 
weekend walks, M-Th recap

Gardeners have received notice that next spring, the Cornell Community Gardens 
along Freese Road will be converted to agriculture instead of community 
horticulture.  I’ve heard vague speculation that the plots will be moved 
elsewhere, but I have no confirmation.  So now is the time to enjoy this 
remarkable site while we still can!

This weekend I’ll lead two more Cayuga Bird Club walks at the gardens, one on 
Saturday and one on Sunday.  I expect a lot of turnover of sparrows and other 
birds with the changing weather – including, I hope, some new arrivals.  Both 
walks start at 8:30 AM in the site’s parking lot -- 
https://goo.gl/maps/FUWhqwBzb172.

I paid brief midday visits the gardens on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday this 
week.  The species mix was about the same each day as Suan and I reported last 
weekend, with multiple INDIGO BUNTINGS and LINCOLN’S, SONG, SWAMP, SAVANNAH, 
CHIPPING, FIELD, and WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS.  I saw a western PALM WARBLER on 
Saturday and again yesterday, but not in between.  I haven’t seen White-crowned 
Sparrow since the one I reported last Friday.

On each visit this week, I kept hearing dull “thgk” notes that I thought were 
from Lincoln’s Sparrow.  I confirmed the ID of these birds many times, without 
any false positives.  But the calls were so frequent and widespread, and so 
many remained unconfirmed, that I still can’t be sure if I was hearing 
something else, like the click of grasshopper wings.  If indeed all the dull 
notes were from Lincoln’s Sparrows, then I’d conclude that there were at least 
half a dozen of them among the plots.

On Wednesday, I forgot my binoculars.  I was mad at myself for a few seconds, 
but then remembered that Meena grew up watching wildlife with an unaided eye, 
maybe becoming a better observer than she would have been with optics.  So I 
stayed and birded by ear and impression and the LCD screen of my camera.  I had 
limited success but good fun.  I did manage to find and photograph two 
Lincoln’s Sparrows together, and to get a rewarding portrait session with one.  
Photos start at https://goo.gl/photos/1yHryZfebUGZfwJcA.

I look forward to seeing many of you this weekend!

Mark Chao


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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Hurricane Joaquin

2015-09-30 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Chris,

Thanks for the heads-up. Remember, all the good birds are on the east side of 
these storms, so we want it to pass to our west. If it stays to the east, all 
we get are heavy rains. The forecast at 
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_at1.shtml?5-daynl#contents makes it look iffy 
for us.

Best,

Kevin


From: bounce-119721746-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119721746-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Christopher T. 
Tessaglia-Hymes
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2015 9:46 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Hurricane Joaquin

Just a heads-up...

I happened to check some of my weather references for the coming week and 
noticed that Tropical Storm Joaquin, currently just East of the Bahamas, is 
forecast to make landfall around the Delmarva Peninsula or Cape May, NJ areas 
as a Category 2 Hurricane (976mb) around 8am Sunday morning (10/4). This system 
will then weaken to a Category 1 Hurricane (992mb) as it moves North through 
central New York, just East of the Finger Lakes Region, on Monday morning 
(10/5) through midnight Monday night and gradually drifting Northeast through 
Tuesday and departing by Wednesday morning (10/7).

Be prepared and have a watchful eye for unexpected and typically pelagic 
seabirds on sizable lakes anytime Monday through Wednesday (10/5-10/7) and on 
the days following the departure of this system from our area, as birds filter 
from Lake Ontario back toward the ocean (10/7-10/9).

The only caveat with this alert is that this is a forecast, and forecasts 
change - especially forecasts greater than a few days out. So, everything 
mentioned above is purely meant as a heads-up to check your favorite weather 
forecast site for more information as Tropical Storm Joaquin develops into a 
Hurricane and heads our way.

Good luck and good birding!!

Sincerely
Chris T-H

PS - one of my favorite sites to evaluate large scale storm systems is Magic 
Seaweed: 
http://magicseaweed.com/US-Northeastern-Seaboard-Surf-Chart/20/?chartType=PRATE


--
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
W: 607-254-2418   M: 607-351-5740   F: 
607-254-1132
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] GHO calling from game farm road

2015-09-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Thanks, Ken. Seriously, Meena? Where are you? We count on you for things like 
this. Really!  ;^)

I was just looking out my window and admiring the moon a little bit ago, before 
the eclipse started. When Ken wrote I looked out and the moon was hidden behind 
leaves and clouds. It just became visible here. Now that I know, I will keep 
watching.

Thanks, Ken, and thanks, Meena for all your past alerts.

No birds calling from my deck, just to keep on topic. Ken, any NFCs?

Kevin

From: bounce-119710205-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119710205-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Kenneth V. 
Rosenberg
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2015 9:08 PM
To: Meena Madhav Haribal
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] GHO calling from game farm road

I hope everyone knows about the Super Blood Lunar Eclipse starting right now- 
usually Meena is the one to alert us :)

Ken

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 27, 2015, at 8:00 PM, Meena Madhav Haribal 
> wrote:
I went to East Hill Athletic field to look at the moon. It was beautiful as it 
was getting out of the cloud. There was a Great Horned Owl calling along with a 
couple of Killdeer.
Sent from my Verizon Wireless Phone
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[cayugabirds-l] dove love

2015-08-10 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I captured some sweet bird behavior outside the Lab at lunchtime today. Check 
out the series beginning with
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/jZuZYNWQcFx4Nlwlh4jjINMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink


Kevin

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RE:[cayugabirds-l] Yellow-throated Vireo

2015-07-13 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
An adult is feeding a fledgling Yellow-throated Vireo there. Some of the 
squeaks are begging calls.

Kevin

From: bounce-119448430-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119448430-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Chris R. Pelkie
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2015 1:12 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Yellow-throated Vireo

Yellow-throated Vireo in full dress color, yellow spectacles, actively feeding 
near the green scummy pond on West Wilson Trail.
He's making a lot of squeaks that sound like a wet thumb dragged quickly over a 
rubber balloon (not real loud, but frequent) which helps locate him as he moves 
around rapidly. Just observed at 1pm.

ChrisP
__

Chris Pelkie
Information/Data Manager; IT Support
Bioacoustics Research Program
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road
Ithaca, NY 14850

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[cayugabirds-l] Orchard Oriole behavior

2015-06-10 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I was watching an adult male Orchard Oriole singing along the circle at Myers 
Point Park this morning, and I noticed something I hadn't before. When the male 
sang, his black throat turned WHITE. When he sang some parts of his song the 
throat feathers were spread, revealing their white bases. It was striking, 
especially from directly below.

I put photos at 
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/VUkCUjpT02rr2ASCZa9fpdMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink,
 including a pair from almost straight on that show the white flash pretty well.

Kevin

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] injured heron (alleged) was taken to vet's

2015-06-10 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I went to check on the bird a bit after four. As I drove there I wondered what 
a heron was doing down in an apartment complex. But when I found building seven 
I looked up and saw the big power lines and I knew what to expect.

Sure enough, when I drove up there was an adult heron lying panting on the 
ground with a horribly broken wing. The wing was pointing the wrong direction, 
and was covered in blood and flies. It was a classic power line strike with 
severely broken wing. It's almost always fatal and undoubtedly extremely painful

I caught the bird quickly with as little stress as possible (for both of us; 
herons are big and potentially dangerous birds).  I took it to the Cornell vet 
school's wildlife clinic where it was examined, anesthetized, and humanely 
euthanized, as I knew it would have to be. The wing was held on only by skin 
and was far beyond repair. The poor bird was in shock and obviously a lot of 
pain.

 I surmise that the heron struck the power lines in the fog in the morning. It 
was apparently flying full speed into the fog because it broke some ribs as 
well as it's wing, poor thing.

I checked its feet and found both back toes present. So, who ever this heron 
was, it was not the male who was breeding on camera at the Lab the last few 
years.

Kevin


Sent from my iPhone
On Jun 10, 2015, at 9:29 PM, Laurie Roe 
roel...@gmail.commailto:roel...@gmail.com wrote:

Hi all, I don't have any details but I was emailed that the bird was on the way 
to the vet's sometime this afternoon! Thanks to rescuers! Laurie

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[nysbirds-l] Possible Arctic Tern at Myers Point

2015-06-02 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
I had a tern on the north side of Myers Point, Lansing, Tompkins County this 
morning that might have been an ARCTIC TERN. I have photos at
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/nlytDEitT_i55UkdYGmeQNMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink,
 and the following images.

The bird was foraging back and forth in the bay north of Salt Point, south to 
the mouth of Salmon Creek. I first saw it there and lost it going north. Later 
I saw it moving along the shore of the bay, near docks on the north side. I 
went to Salt Point and watched it fly back and forth down the shoreline until I 
lost it on a northward move.

I originally thought it was a Forster's Tern because the upper surfaces of the 
wings were so clean and white. I could see flashes of white(er) in the wingtips 
on occasion when the bird banked, and never saw any dark in the inner section 
of the primaries, as I would expect with Common Tern. There was a thin solid 
dark trailing edge to the outermost primaries that did not extend to the 
innermost or the secondaries.

Unlike Forster's Tern, however, the belly was darker than the rump and face. 
The white rump extended onto the tail, not contrasting with it, which in the 
photos shows clearly darker outer edges. In the dim light I could not confirm a 
dark tip to the bill, but it did not look long or orange-based like a Forster's.

I jokingly told myself to stop thinking Common vs. Forster's and start trying 
to make it into an Arctic Tern. But, I didn't seriously consider the idea until 
I showed Jay the photos.

Any Sterna tern is unusual in the county this time of year, so I hope others 
will go out and look for this bird.

Kevin

Kevin J. McGowan, Ph.D.
Project Manager
Distance Learning in Bird Biology
Cornell Lab of Ornithology
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Ithaca, NY 14850
k...@cornell.edumailto:k...@cornell.edu
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RE: [cayugabirds-l] More Acadians

2015-05-16 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
-Original Message-
From: bounce-119275534-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119275534-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Geo Kloppel
...

Canada Warblers were present all along our walk, so I had the opportunity to 
reflect that a mnemonic phrase is not just a device for retrieving a bird song 
from memory, it also turns up the gain on the associated detector.

-Geo Kloppel

So, one has to ask, what is your mnemonic for Canada Warbler? I confess it's 
one of the warbler songs I'm least confident identifying.

Kevin

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RE: [cayugabirds-l] Why to not feed jelly to orioles

2015-05-16 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Fruit is probably better than concentrated sugars, but domesticated grapes and 
oranges aren’t really “natural” foods, either. They have been selected to have 
more sugar, more flesh, and fewer other compounds than natural fruits.

I wouldn’t give much credence to this article. It gives no authenticated facts, 
only opinions. And anyone who thinks birds have a “satiety gland” doesn’t sound 
very knowledgeable.

Sugar is hard to come by in the natural world; that’s why we crave it so much. 
Orioles are adapted to eat lots of sugar when it’s available. I wouldn’t worry 
about some birds eating small quantities of overly concentrated sugar. It’s 
probably just a drop in the bucket of all the food they eat in a day.

My opinion.

Kevin

From: bounce-119275273-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119275273-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of Karen Edelstein
Sent: Saturday, May 16, 2015 7:14 AM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: [cayugabirds-l] Why to not feed jelly to orioles


Here's an informative article that endorses sticking with natural sugars 
(grapes and oranges).

http://nmconservationnetwork.org/2014/04/20/please-no-jelly-for-orioles/
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RE: Re:[cayugabirds-l] Albino Purple Finch Correction

2015-05-02 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Actually, I believe the term albino is more accurate for this bird. Albinism 
refers to the lack of melanin pigments. True albinos can still contain 
carotenoid-based pigments, such as the rosy wash on your bird.

Kevin

-Original Message-
From: bounce-119121704-3493...@list.cornell.edu 
[mailto:bounce-119121704-3493...@list.cornell.edu] On Behalf Of 
bilba...@pop.lightlink.com
Sent: Friday, May 01, 2015 10:17 PM
To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re:[cayugabirds-l] Albino Purple Finch Correction

In my initial post the term leucistic would have been a more accurate 
description of the bird...

Bill
Baker

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[cayugabirds-l] FW: Photography Awards Winners

2015-04-27 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Look who won the grand prize!!  Congratulations, Melissa!

Kevin

From: National Audubon Society [mailto:audubonconn...@audubon.org]
Sent: Monday, April 27, 2015 10:01 AM
To: Kevin J. McGowan
Subject: Photography Awards Winners

See the five winners and top 100 images.
[National Audubon 
Society]http://www.audubonaction.org/site/R?i=xo1szE8HGiXhYzg0VVJW2A



The photos are in, and they are magnificent. See the five winners and the top 
100 images from this year's Audubon Photography Awards displayed in arresting 
beauty on Audubon's new website.

Thanks to everyone who submitted, and congratulations to the winners!

[See the Winning 
Photos]http://www.audubonaction.org/site/R?i=9km_kNHBQ8FvKuD3bxjjUw



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[cayugabirds-l] redpolls continue

2015-04-12 Thread Kevin J. McGowan
Wow! A beautiful male Common Redpoll in a late afternoon shaft of sunlight. The 
deep rose on his throat opened up and faded across his chest, as if he had 
spilled a bright red wine down his front. In the intense sunshine the red was 
electric against the white cheeks and chest. I took a couple photos, which I 
will post tomorrow, but they only hint at the breathtaking experience of it in 
real life.
I still have at least six redpolls still coming to my feeder. I will enjoy them 
as long as they keep coming. I like redpolls a lot, and I really enjoy them 
all, even the dull ones. But, uf-dah! they can be gorgeous sometimes.

Kevin

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