Re: [WSG] HTML5 v. HTML 4.x

2011-01-24 Thread Christian Snodgrass
One word : semantics.

It all has to do with what the tags mean to the computer. For example, you
can write div class=code to specify that the markup in that div is code
and should be displayed as such. However, to the browser, the means nothing
more than div class=happyfuntime. They're both just divs.

Now, if you use the new code element instead, that tells the browser it is
code.

I've been reluctant as well, but today I decided to start implementing some
of the elements and switched to the HTML doctype for a major project I'm
working on.

Hope that helps.
-Christian

On Jan 24, 2011 2:49 PM, grant_malcolm_bai...@westnet.com.au wrote:


Hello,

Could someone please clarify this for me. I realise that HTML5 has
introduced new semantic elements such as header, aside etc., but does
this really increase the expressive power of the markup? Can't the same
thing be achieved in HTML 4.x using classes (e.g. p class=header)?

I am reluctant to move to HTML5 due to the issue of backwards compatibility.

I would be grateful for any replies.

Regards,

Grant Bailey

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Re: [WSG] Site for Vision Impaired

2010-11-28 Thread Christian Snodgrass
It also depends what type of visual impairments. For example, there are like
6 types of color blindness allow, all which distort the colors in varying
ways. If you're just talking about low vision, then you want to have larger
fonts then normal. I'd say probably bump up the body font size one notch (so
maybe 16 instead of 14), but also, as others have said, be flexible to user
size changes.

Also, make sure you have very good contrast between your background and
foreground. For vision impaired, it's likely to be better if you use a soft
blue or yellow (very light) background with dark (not black, maybe #333)
text, instead of white on black, because it causes less eye strain.

On Sun, Nov 28, 2010 at 12:49 PM, Stuart Foulstone
stu...@bigeasyweb.co.ukwrote:


 http://www.w3.org/WAI/EO/Drafts/PWD-Use-Web/#tools


 On Fri, November 26, 2010 11:25 pm, Daniel Anderson wrote:
  G'day Everyone,
 
  I was wondering if any of you have done any work on sites for the
 visually
  impaired? I have just started a projet for a school for the visually
  impaired and the site must cater for these people, and obvioulsy for
  people
  with normal eysite.
 
  What are the considerations I need to take into account with a project
  like
  this? eg ability to change contrast, text size etc? Are there any good
  resources or advice you could share with me?
 
  It would be greatly appreciated.
 
 
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Re: [WSG] Google 'X-ray' banner

2010-11-08 Thread Christian Snodgrass
It looks like they just took the bone images and over-layed their logo on
top in a blue color and made it a bit transparent. It'd just be a matter of
playing around with color values and transparencies.

- Chris

On Mon, Nov 8, 2010 at 7:13 AM, Grant Bailey 
grant_malcolm_bai...@westnet.com.au wrote:

 Hello,

 Does anyone know how Google did their 'X-ray' banner that appeared
 today? (See
 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/google/8116827/X-rays-150th-annive
 rsary-celebrated-with-Google-Doodle.html if the banner has been
 replaced.) It glows and fades. This is not Flash, so I'd love to know
 how they did it. Does anyone know? Is it an animated Gif, or some HTML5
 trick?

 Thank you,

 Grant Bailey




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Re: [WSG] Google 'X-ray' banner

2010-11-08 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Oh, sorry, I somehow missed the last sentence.

Yeah, it's just an animated gif. You could pretty easily create one using
Flash, then export as an animated gif.

On Mon, Nov 8, 2010 at 7:32 AM, Foskett, Mike mike.fosk...@uk.tesco.comwrote:

 Animated GIF I believe.

 mike foskett
 http://websemantics.co.uk/


 -Original Message-
 From: li...@webstandardsgroup.org [mailto:li...@webstandardsgroup.org] On
 Behalf Of Grant Bailey
 Sent: 08 November 2010 12:14
 To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
 Subject: [WSG] Google 'X-ray' banner

 Hello,

 Does anyone know how Google did their 'X-ray' banner that appeared
 today? (See
 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/google/8116827/X-rays-150th-annive
 rsary-celebrated-with-Google-Doodle.html if the banner has been
 replaced.) It glows and fades. This is not Flash, so I'd love to know
 how they did it. Does anyone know? Is it an animated Gif, or some HTML5
 trick?

 Thank you,

 Grant Bailey




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 This is a confidential email. Tesco may monitor and record all emails. The
 views expressed in this email are those of the sender and not Tesco.

 Tesco Stores Limited
 Company Number: 519500
 Registered in England
 Registered Office: Tesco House, Delamare Road, Cheshunt, Hertfordshire EN8
 9SL
 VAT Registration Number: GB 220 4302 31


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Re: [WSG] Google 'X-ray' banner

2010-11-08 Thread Christian Snodgrass
If anything, I think the message once decrypted would be congrats... you
wasted two days of work on this message. =p

On Mon, Nov 8, 2010 at 6:35 PM, tee weblis...@gmail.com wrote:



  Uday - It's not a JPG its an animated GIF

 Since the list-dad allows the continued off-topic kept running, I thought I
 ask this: are those symbols  some sort of Da Vinci codes waiting for gifted
 web programmers/developer to decrypt?


 tee

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Re: [WSG] Image Maps

2010-10-14 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Can you use an image map?

Yes.

Do people still use image maps?

Yes.

Should you find a better way to implement it?

Absolutely.

Basically image maps can be used, but they aren't usually a good idea. A
better method would be to split it up into separate images and smash them
together to look like one map. This lets you add alt tags and what-not to
make it more accessible.

There are other techniques you could employ as well, depending on your exact
needs.

On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 2:32 PM, Steve Green steve.gr...@testpartners.co.uk
 wrote:

 -Original Message-
 From: li...@webstandardsgroup.org [mailto:li...@webstandardsgroup.org]
 On Behalf Of Christian Montoya
 Sent: 14 October 2010 18:56
 To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
 Subject: Re: [WSG] Image Maps

 On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 1:43 PM, Tom Livingston tom...@gmail.com
 wrote:
  On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 12:52 PM, David Dorward da...@dorward.me.uk
 wrote:
 
  On 14 Oct 2010, at 17:27, Tom Livingston wrote:
 
  Are image maps still ok?
 
  Still?
 
  Server side image maps are as inaccessible as ever.
 
  Client side image maps had issues last time I looked at them, but
 things might have improved since then.
 
  http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/html/mapalt.htmlhttp://www.cs.tut.fi/%7Ejkorpela/html/mapalt.htmlis
   an (oldish)
 resource which describes some of the issues and ways to work around
 them.
 
  --
  David Dorward
  http://dorward.me.uk
 
 
  When I say ok I mean as OK as they can be. And the question may
  have been better as Does anyone still use image maps?
 
  Anyway, thanks for the link.

 Bandcamp is an indie-artist music store service that allows you to
 design your own storefront, but if you want to link to other sites from
 your header, you have to use an image map. So yes, there are people out
 there still using image maps. I'm one of them. But not by choice.

 --
 --
 Christian Montoya
 mappdev.com :: christianmontoya.net



 We have a client who creates e-learning courses for the public sector,
 and they make extensive use of image maps. In most cases, clicking the
 link causes new content to be displayed on the current page rather than
 loading a new page. We keep telling them to implement the feature
 differently but they persist despite all the accessibility problems it
 causes.

 Steve Green
 Test Partners Ltd


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Re: [WSG] Image Maps

2010-10-14 Thread Christian Snodgrass
You can use transparent images and negative margins.

The simplest way to set this up would be to use a program like Fireworks
(which lets you move stuff around freely and gives you an x and y).

Cut up all of your states into separate images with transparent backgrounds.

Then you can bring them all into a Fireworks file, position them properly,
then use the x and y it gives you to figure out the negative margins for
them.

On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 3:21 PM, cat soul cats...@thinkplan.org wrote:


 On Oct 14, 2010, at 12:09 PM, Christian Snodgrass wrote:

 Basically image maps can be used, but they aren't usually a good idea. A
 better method would be to split it up into separate images and smash them
 together to look like one map. This lets you add alt tags and what-not to
 make it more accessible.



 In the case of a map of, say, the USA, how would you achieve this smashing
 together, while still having the smashed-together images look like the
 contiguous US of A?

 cs

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Re: [WSG] Image Maps

2010-10-14 Thread Christian Snodgrass
In the US map problem, an image map may make sense.

However, there are many more in which an image map doesn't make sense. For
example, having a graphical menu with an image map, having a header image
map for links, etc. These would be better done using separate images.

Also, sometimes a scripted method might work best. For example, you could
have each state a different image and different color. Instead of having to
try to do a crazy 800 point polygon, you could do a script where it compares
the color under the cursor when you click and determines which state you
clicked on with high precision.

I'm not saying image maps should never be used... I'm saying that you should
keep in mind alternatives because image maps are frequently abused.

- Christian

On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 5:12 PM, Hassan Schroeder has...@webtuitive.comwrote:

 On 10/14/10 1:23 PM, Christian Snodgrass wrote:

  If you needed to get more exact, you could use any number of Javascript
 script to get more exact
 results.


 And all this thrashing about is going to provide a more accessible
 solution than an image map?


  The exact solution depends on the exact problem.


 How about the exact problem being the one that image maps were
 *designed* to solve? Allowing arbitrary shapes within an image to
 be linked to different content? As in the US state example?

 --
 Hassan Schroeder - has...@webtuitive.com
 webtuitive design ===  (+1) 408-621-3445   === http://webtuitive.com
 twitter: @hassan
  dream.  code.



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Re: [WSG] Image Maps

2010-10-14 Thread Christian Snodgrass
That map also illustrates the problem with image maps.

Disable images and refresh the page. It becomes completely unusable (granted
there are ways to make the image map work better with no images, but this is
the more common situation).

If they were all separate images with their own alt tags, they could form a
nice little list of states when there are no images.

- Christian

On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 7:30 PM, Henrik Madsen hen...@igenerator.com.auwrote:


 US map example: http://davidlynch.org/js/maphilight/docs/demo_usa.html

 [image: GENERATOR] http://www.igenerator.com.au/


 *Henrik Madsen*
 +61 08 9387 1250
 hen...@igenerator.com.au
 www.igenerator.com.au

 On 15/10/2010, at 7:19 AM, Christian Snodgrass wrote:

 In the US map problem, an image map may make sense.

 However, there are many more in which an image map doesn't make sense. For
 example, having a graphical menu with an image map, having a header image
 map for links, etc. These would be better done using separate images.

 Also, sometimes a scripted method might work best. For example, you could
 have each state a different image and different color. Instead of having to
 try to do a crazy 800 point polygon, you could do a script where it compares
 the color under the cursor when you click and determines which state you
 clicked on with high precision.

 I'm not saying image maps should never be used... I'm saying that you
 should keep in mind alternatives because image maps are frequently abused.

 - Christian

 On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 5:12 PM, Hassan Schroeder 
 has...@webtuitive.comwrote:

 On 10/14/10 1:23 PM, Christian Snodgrass wrote:

  If you needed to get more exact, you could use any number of Javascript
 script to get more exact
 results.


 And all this thrashing about is going to provide a more accessible
 solution than an image map?


  The exact solution depends on the exact problem.


 How about the exact problem being the one that image maps were
 *designed* to solve? Allowing arbitrary shapes within an image to
 be linked to different content? As in the US state example?

 --
 Hassan Schroeder - has...@webtuitive.com
 webtuitive design ===  (+1) 408-621-3445   === http://webtuitive.com
 twitter: @hassan
  dream.  code.



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Re: [WSG] Image Maps

2010-10-14 Thread Christian Snodgrass
As far as I know, image maps are not deprecated... just often abused so you
should really consider your options. I agree with your little analogy as
well. I'd evaluate exactly what the problem is and then pick a solution.

For example, if all the shapes in the potential map are square, it'd be easy
to separate into individual images. If they would need 800 points in a
polygon, maybe a color-picker based JS script could be employed (you could
probably write one of these in 100 pixels). If you don't need to be that
specific, just place anchor tags over a plain image (or use them as
background images in the anchor), etc.

And there are definitely ways to make image maps more accessible.

I'd say if you came across something that you thought about using an image
map, just ask yourself what other solutions you can use and evaluate if any
of those may be a better fit.

- Christian

On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 7:40 PM, Mathew Robertson 
mathew.blair.robert...@gmail.com wrote:


  US map example: http://davidlynch.org/js/maphilight/docs/demo_usa.html


 That isn't really a good example of accessibility + images-maps, as it
 doesn't have any... maybe it could be updated to use the tabindex attribute.

 cheers,
 Mathew Robertson

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Re: [WSG] Image Maps

2010-10-14 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Agreed.

However, with the separate images you can put them in an unordered list
yourself to control the display a bit more closely.

I'm not saying any of these are 100% good all the time. I like to soak up as
many different techniques as possible and choose the one that is the most
appropriate for the task.

On Thu, Oct 14, 2010 at 8:05 PM, Mathew Robertson 
mathew.blair.robert...@gmail.com wrote:

 That is unnecessary - area's support alt.  With both CSS and images
 disabled, a useragent should be able to draw the USA-map graphically using a
 fallback css; if using a text-browser, it could render it as a list -
 whether they actually do, is an entirely different problem, ie: if an image
 has 'usemap' (and a map exists with alt attributes) then the text-browser
 could assume that a flat list could be rendered.

 Aside: the spec (http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/struct/objects.html#h-13.6) says
 ... with a mouse...

 regards,
 Mathew Robertson


 On 15 October 2010 10:43, Christian Snodgrass csnodgrass3...@gmail.comwrote:

 That map also illustrates the problem with image maps.

 Disable images and refresh the page. It becomes completely unusable
 (granted there are ways to make the image map work better with no images,
 but this is the more common situation).

 If they were all separate images with their own alt tags, they could form
 a nice little list of states when there are no images.


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Re: [WSG] semantic structure for icon and text

2010-05-11 Thread Christian Snodgrass

I would recommend option 2, for two main reasons:
1) An icon is more of a decoration. It does serve a function purpose, 
but without that icon that original context is still intact.

2) It's cleaner code. =p

Just my two cents. However, I can see the argument for putting it 
directly in an image, though I wouldn't go with the spacer method. 
That's a bit antiquated.


- Christian

On 5/11/2010 5:48 AM, Naveen Bhaskar - live wrote:

Hi,
what is the correct semantic structure for putting an icon in the 
website. when I checked  youtube , I see the icons loaded with css to 
a spacer which is 1x1 size. Is that a good approach?
 I want to show an email id with an email icon with that. can anyone 
suggest me the right semantic structure .

span class=email
img src=spacer.gif alt='
a href=mailto:a...@gmail.comsome_email_id/a
/span
or
just a href=mailto:a...@gmail.comsome_email_id/a and attach the 
icon with css background property for the anchor tag?

thanks a lot in advance.
.naveen_bhaskar
{
email : naveenbhaskar...@gmail.com 
mailto:naveenbhaskar...@gmail.com;

yahoo : naveenbhas...@ymail.com mailto:naveenbhas...@ymail.com;
 }

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Re: [WSG] the mysteries of overflow: hidden

2010-02-10 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I'm not sure I understand what you're asking. Could you put together a 
quick example to illustrate.


Basically what overflow: hidden does is anything that doesn't fit into 
it's given container is hidden, basically meaning that it doesn't affect 
the height of it's container. This only works if the parent has a height 
set. If it doesn't, overflow: hidden has absolutely no effect.


Here is an example: http://www.arwebdesign.net/test2.html

In the first one, the container has a static height (500px) and no 
overflow. The text just streams right out of the container.
In the second one, the container still has a static height, but has 
overflow: hidden. This time, the text just disappears.
In the third one, the container has no height set, but has overflow: 
hidden. This time, the container's height stretches to accommodate it's 
contents.
In the fourth one, the container has no height set and has no overflow. 
This functions exactly the same as the third. Overflow hidden had no 
effect on the third one without a height being set.


Hope that clarifies overflow: hidden a bit.

- Christian

On 2/10/2010 1:50 PM, Jody Tate wrote:

(I'm a list lurker. Also, apologies if this has been covered before.)

In CSS, setting a div to overflow: hidden solves a problem it shouldn't--at 
least from the name of the property and value, it seems like it shouldn't.

Often I'll have text, e.g. an h1, overflowing its containing/parent div, but setting the 
containing/parent div to overflow: hidden causes the parent div to set its 
height in a way that the formerly overflowing text no longer overflows.

I've seen this happen for years. Another developer showed me this fix years ago. But over 
the years, I've never read an explanation why overflow: hidden fixes a 
problem its name implies it wouldn't.

Have others seen this? Any explanations?

-jody




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--
Christian Snodgrass
CEO - Azure Ronin
http://www.arwebdesign.net
http://www.htmlblox.com
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] Accessibility does not matter!

2010-01-29 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Not a bad read.

I'm about halfway in between your view and accessibility all the time. 
I do agree that there is a lot of accessibility for the sake of 
accessibility, however, there are also lots of things that are so easy 
to do that they should always be done, even if your target market 
doesn't explicitly need that.


Thanks for the interesting read.
- Christian

On 1/29/2010 9:09 AM, Jason Grant wrote:

Hello friends,

I was going to post a big debate on 'Why accessibility doesn't matter'
to this list, but have delegated it to a blog post on the similar
subject instead.

I feel there has been LOADS of 'accessibility is a must' type
discussion on this list, but at the same time I feel that there is
loads of arguments which are essentially 'accessibility for the sake
of accessibility'.

My point is that we are heading towards the times where 'relevant
accessibility' is more important than 'accessibility' per se.

Please have a read of my article and comment via email or on the blog itself.

http://www.flexewebs.com/semantix/accessibility-does-not-matter/

Thank you very much.

Regards,

Jason

   



--
Christian Snodgrass
CEO - Azure Ronin
http://www.arwebdesign.net
http://www.htmlblox.com
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] table inside a dd?

2009-08-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Certainly, as long as it's an appropriate usage of a table (which it 
sounds like it is).


- Christian

Tim MacKay wrote:


Hi all,

Is it semantic markup to include a table of items ( in this case a 
nutritional information table ) as the contents of a dd within a 
definition list?


I am marking up product nutritional information and am thinking of 
doing it like so:


dl

dt The Product /dt

dd Paragraph blurb about the product /dd

dd

table

…etcTabular data of the nutritional information/…etc

/table

/dd

/dl

Is nesting the table within the def list valid markup?

Thanks J

Tim


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CEO - Azure Ronin
http://www.arwebdesign.net
http://www.htmlblox.com
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] Box model in IE7

2009-04-23 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Just a little comment: usually I will put the font-size: 62.5% on the 
body element instead of the HTML element. Doing it this way I've never 
had an issue, even in IE (back to at least 5.5). Placing it on the HTML 
element seems a bit goofy to me since the HTML element can never have 
font anyways.


Brett Patterson wrote:
I have always been told to use something along the lines of either 
body { font-size: 100%; /* a fix for internet explorer */ } because of 
the way IE reads/sizes font. Starting out with html at only 62.5% 
font-sizing would completely mess up IE and the font in the browser 
would it not?


--
Brett P.


On Thu, Apr 23, 2009 at 7:56 PM, CK jobs@bushidodeep.com 
mailto:jobs@bushidodeep.com wrote:


Hi,

Would you elaborate on why the CSS rule invalidates the article?
As it appears the authors explanation is sound.


html {
 font-size: 62.5%;
   }



CK



On Apr 23, 2009, at 11:28 AM, Chris F.A. Johnson wrote:

On Thu, 23 Apr 2009, Christopher Kennon wrote:

S,

See this article from Links for light Reading scrolling
down a bit you'll
find a JS solution that may prove useful:

Why Programmers Suck at CSS Design
http://www.betaversion.org/~stefano/linotype/news/169/
http://www.betaversion.org/%7Estefano/linotype/news/169/


 That article ceased to be credible as soon as I saw:

My suggestion for you is to do the following: start your CSS
 stylesheet with

   html {
 font-size: 62.5%;
   }



On Apr 22, 2009, at 4:18 PM, Stevio wrote:

Is the box model in IE7 still messed up? I thought
they sorted it?


 It is fixed in standards mode, but I think it uses the broken
model
 in quirks mode.

I am floating a div to the right with a width of 50%.
The div to the left
has a right margin of 50%. I've put a 1px solid border
on both of them. In
IE7 there is a gap between them but in Firefox they
are right against each
other.

Go figure?


-- 
 Chris F.A. Johnson, webmaster
http://woodbine-gerrard.com

 ===
 Author:
 Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach (2005,
Apress)


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Re: [WSG] Marking up news

2009-02-19 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I'd suggest this as well, normally. However, it seems like how this is 
going to be used is to provide a list of news articles, and since it's a 
list it makes sense to use a list element for it's markup. At least 
that's what I inferred from the initial examples.


Mike at Green-Beast.com wrote:

Hi Essential,


I'm making a news plugin but I'm un-sure what
the best/most accesible way is to mark it up?


I'd suggest neither. I'd recommend something more conventional such as:

h1Our News/h1
 pThe following are our latest news articles:/p

h2News Heading/h2
 p class=smaller-textNews Date/p
 pNews content/p

Not as fancy, but I believe this is a simple, semantic, and accessible 
method.


Respectfully,
Mike Cherim
http://green-beast.com



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Re: [WSG] What's the best way to place a link in a document? [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

2009-02-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Andrew Maben wrote:

On Feb 16, 2009, at 6:57 PM, Chris F.A. Johnson wrote:


Use Example A; you can make as visible as you like with CSS.




+1

Andrew

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Same, example A is the way to go.

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Re: [WSG] What's the best way to place a link in a document? [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

2009-02-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Andrew Maben wrote:

On Feb 16, 2009, at 6:57 PM, Chris F.A. Johnson wrote:


Use Example A; you can make as visible as you like with CSS.




+1

Andrew

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Same, example A is the way to go.

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Re: [WSG] What's the best way to place a link in a document? [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

2009-02-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Andrew Maben wrote:

On Feb 16, 2009, at 6:57 PM, Chris F.A. Johnson wrote:


Use Example A; you can make as visible as you like with CSS.




+1

Andrew

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Same, example A is the way to go.

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Re: [WSG] What's the best way to place a link in a document? [SEC=UNCLASSIFIED]

2009-02-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Andrew Maben wrote:

On Feb 16, 2009, at 6:57 PM, Chris F.A. Johnson wrote:


Use Example A; you can make as visible as you like with CSS.




+1

Andrew

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Same, example A is the way to go.

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Re: [WSG] Title attribute

2009-01-11 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Just another note: EVERY element has a title attribute, not just the 
anchor attribute. Title is one of those basic properties like id and 
name. It doesn't have any unique use for any specific element, it just 
allows you to provide a bit more information for the element (which is 
usually displayed when the user mouses over the element).


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Re: [WSG] Which is read first? Scripts or Styles?

2008-11-24 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Brett Patterson wrote:
I have no idea why, but for some reason I cannot remember which is 
read first! Are scripts or styles read first? And which is the 
recommended order to list them? Styles or Scripts first?


--
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They are read in the order you list them in your HTML. However, if you 
change elements with Javascript, the CSS is still applied to the new 
stuff as well. Basically, regardless when loaded the CSS always acts on 
everything. Javascript needs to be run after any elements it might need 
to edit though.


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CEO - Azure Ronin
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Re: HTML reached end of life?? (Was: Re: [WSG] Sorry Link)

2008-11-24 Thread Christian Snodgrass
That is most definitely incorrect. HTML5 is in development as we speak. 
HTML is far from the end of it's life.


rch lib wrote:

Hi,

I took a look at that Drew Mclellan article. He says:

Step 3: Future-proof your site with XHTML
HTML has reached the end of its life and is no longer being developed as a
mark-up language. Its replacement is Extensible HTML (XHTML)—an
implementation of XML that works in all browsers, old and new. Even though
XHTML is strict XML, its tags and attributes are so similar to HTML that
old browsers do not spot the difference. Using XML is advantageous because
it's a modern, future-proof standard.

Is that correct?? Disappointingly (and astonishingly) there is no date on
the article, so perhaps it's just outdated, but isn't the existance of
HTML5 evidence that HTML has in fact not reached end of life? 


Just a bit concerned that a newcomer might see that and be mislead.

Or do I have it wrong?

lib.






At 10:14 PM 24/11/2008 +1100, you wrote:
  

Hi

You might want to look at this tutorial by Drew Mclellan at:

http://www.adobe.com/devnet/dreamweaver/extreme/five_steps.html

You don't need DreamWeaver to do it.

--
Peter Mount
Web Development for Business
Mobile: 0411 276602
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
http://www.petermount.com

On 24/11/2008, at 10:00 PM, kate wrote:



http://www.jungaling.com/katalinadesigns/index.html

Thanks, sorry I forgot the link in my earlier mail.
Kate


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Re: [WSG] HTML/XHTML/XML - Question about the future of.

2008-11-20 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Micky Hulse wrote:

Christian Montoya wrote:
You'll have telepathic computer displays before _real_ XHTML replaces 
HTML.

link rel=stylesheet type=text/css media=mind href=...


Ha! Nice one.

A while back, I stopped using XHTML strict and switched to HTML 4.01 
strict DTD's.


Personally, I think HTML 4.01 strict is a good pick.

I think some would say It does not matter if the DTD is XHTML/HTML... 
As long as it is strict.


This FAQ is a good resource:

Frequently Asked Questions About XHTML vs HTML
http://www.sitepoint.com/forums/showthread.php?t=393445


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I made the same decision. I still follow HTML and XHTML, but anything I 
do (and have a choice about) is always HTML 4.01 Strict. I think it 
makes more sense than XHTML 1.0 Strict at this point since we can't 
really use real XHTML yet. It seems to defeat the purpose if you are 
using a Strict DTD incorrectly.



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Re: [WSG] JavaScript clarification please

2008-10-24 Thread Christian Snodgrass

David Dorward wrote:

Brett Patterson wrote:
  

Why would you avoid w3schools? They do have some good information. So why?



They have a lot of bad information - and spotting the difference is hard
if you are trying to learn from them.


  
I second that. They actually have a LOT more bad information than they 
do good information, and what little good information they have is often 
quite out of date (so, it was good information, but not anymore).



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Re: [WSG] .NET sites which are XHTML 1.0 strict

2008-10-07 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Those all have errors (and are HTML, not XHTML). The errors are minor, 
but there are a number of them.


Robin Gorry wrote:

http://www.mucu4u.org.nz/Home_61.aspx
http://www.oneeast.co.nz/
http://www.colorfastsigns.co.nz/Home_34.aspx



Robin Gorry
Senior Web Developer
Xplore Net Solutions



Xplore.net Website of the Week:  Weleda (Australia) - www.weleda.com.au 



Weleda has a range of anthroposophic medicine - the simple yet powerful
way to utilise nature's medicines to stimulate the body to 'heal
itself'.  Until recently their website did not accurately reflect their
brand and they had no easy way to profile their product range to their
Australian consumers.
  


The new Weleda website is powered by the Xsite content manager, Xforms,
Xshop, Xmembers and Xtend. Combined, this powerful toolset enables
Weleda staff to add/edit/delete pages, text and imagery throughout their
site, create online forms and surveys, provide an online product
catalogue and issue logins to restricted access areas on their website.



f:  00 64 (0)6 834 24 86
e : [EMAIL PROTECTED]
w: www.xplore.net


Take control of your website - ask me today about Xsite-tomorrows
Content Management System

CONFIDENTIALITY: This e-mail and any attachments are confidential and
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If you are not the named recipient, please notify the sender immediately
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-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
On Behalf Of Anthony Milner
Sent: 08 October 2008 15:23
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: [WSG] .NET sites which are XHTML 1.0 strict

Hi,

I was having a *chat* with some .NET developer colleagues and they
challenged me to find a .NET site that achieves XHTML 1.0 strict
compliance. Hoping to prove to them that it can be done.

Does anybody know of some .NET sites which are XHTML 1.0 strict (or even
transitional)?

Thanks,
Anthony

 



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Re: [WSG] Coding for CSS3?

2008-10-02 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Ben Lau wrote:

Hi all,

I'm having trouble deciding whether to begin coding using CSS3, such 
as using (but not limited to) opacity. Although the CSS validator 
returns an error, but it claims it'll be supported in CSS3. As far as 
i know, FF2, FF3, Opera and Safari already renders the opacity 
property, leaving Internet Explorer, which we could use alpha 
properties in separate stylesheets and conditional comments. Anyone 
know if IE8 supports it?


I haven't had a good look at all CSS3 properties yet, but I'm 
wondering if this is a good time to code for the future? Or better to 
wait for official release of CSS3?

If CSS3 is released tomorrow, what about older browsers like IE6?

Cheers,
Ben

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If you want to use them, you can, but use them cautiously and make sure 
that nothing will fall apart if those CSS3 properties aren't available.


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Re: [WSG] Incorporating Terms and Cons in signup page

2008-09-30 Thread Christian Snodgrass
What I see a lot of times that seems to be a decent idea is in the form 
have a check box with the label I have read and agree to the Terms  
Conditions. Then, have Terms  Conditions actually be a link to a 
separate document (preferably a web page) which actually has the terms 
and conditions. It seems to work well and those that don't read them 
anyways don't have to deal with it, but it's readily available for those 
that do, and it gets them to check the box regardless.


John Unsworth wrote:

Hi WSG,
I'm wondering about the best method to incorporate in a signup form a
Terms and Conditions agreement, which being so long will be bought to
the page externally. Or if it's thought best, maybe not!
On a previous occasion I went forward using the object tag. The
advantage to my mind is that, my document (that may change in future)
is separate to the form and for those who don't have a browser capable
of using the object tag, can see alternative text to link to the
separately hosted TC page.
But it's been put to me at work, there might be a way to house the
document in a div, give the div a fixed size and make it scrollable.
Alternatively I could use a textarea element, although I'm given to
understand it would need to be outside the form so as not include it
in the 'Signup' event when the submit button is clicked. However to
satisfy the designer, who follows that the convention is that the form
is visually seen before the last submit button, I'd use CSS to
position it - but that doesn't sound very semantic to me?
Putting it on another page, that you would link to, read, then return
to the form to agree to has been rejected for the sanctity of the
concept of a single page signup document.
I hope I've been clear, and I guess I'm interested in anything similar
to this in best practice, accessibility and standards.
Cheers for just being there folks,
John Unsworth


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Re: [WSG] Facebook downgrading support for IE6

2008-09-02 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I agree that it's not a good idea to flat out block someone from 
browsing your website with a certain browser. That reminds me of way 
back when during the IE/Netscape wars where half the pages you would go 
to had a block for one or the other.


I think a better idea if you want to drop IE6 support is to simply make 
your website how your would for the other browsers. Than, you could 
check it in IE6 and fix any major glitches, but don't worry about the 
minor details (or not, if you really wanted to flat out drop it). Then, 
use scripting to determine the browser, and if it is IE6 or lower, put a 
small banner at the top of your page saying You should upgrade your 
browser, or try out one of the Internet Explorer alternatives. This site 
may not function entirely correct with older versions of IE. and 
provide alternative links.


This is the method I will shortly be adopting and I think it's good for 
pushing IE6 out the door, without slamming that door on potential visitors.


Michael Horowitz wrote:
IMHO it seems to me to be a violation of web standards to tell the 
user what browser to use.



Michael Horowitz
Your Computer Consultant
http://yourcomputerconsultant.com
561-394-9079



Gregorio Espadas wrote:
I like the IE6Blocker from Chris Coyier, check it out at 
http://css-tricks.com/ie-6-blocker-script/


I made a spanish translation of IE6Blocker, download it from 
http://espadas.com.mx/2008/09/01/bloqueando-internet-explorer-6/


Gregorio Espadas
http://espadas.com.mx



On Mon, Sep 1, 2008 at 6:37 PM, Susie Gardner-Brown 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


I came upon this -

http://www.kryogenix.org/days/2008/08/27/facebook-doesnt-really-support-ie6 



If Facebook (or the 'new' Facebook look) is doing this, maybe it
will really start to move IE6 out the door ...

One can only hope anyway!!

+++
Susie Gardner-Brown
blog:  http://susiegb/blogspot.com
web: http://www.greendoorwebsites.com



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Re: [WSG] Facebook downgrading support for IE6

2008-09-02 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Yet another thing that is Facebook specific that I just thought about. I 
may be overstating this, since I have no actual statistics to back it 
up, but I'd wager that a very large part of Facebook's population is 
from the more tech-savvy  generations, so their usage statistics of IE6 
may be far lower than your average website. Additionally, since a large 
portion of there population is (was?) college students who generally 
reside on-campus, they are likely to have more up-to-date systems 
because nearly all colleges require that you stay current with Windows 
updates to access their network (meaning use the internet, not 
necessarily access an intranet), so a lot of the users already have IE6 
or greater.


Not saying I completely agree with this approach, but at the same time 
it is highly unreasonable for a web system like Facebook to be able to 
individually provide fall backs and fail-safes for IE6.


In addition, I think it is actually about time that we as web developers 
began pushing for users to upgrade. Simple non-invasive messages on the 
top of our website for those that are using outdated browsers are simple 
to implement, easily ignored by those that want to, and are helpful for 
those that aren't as tech-savvy. Many people that are using IE6 don't 
realize they are using an outdated version. I'd wager to bet that 99% of 
those still using IE6 couldn't tell you the browser version they are 
using because they aren't acclimated enough to know that there are 
different versions of Internet Explorer. Most of these users are those 
stereotypical users that think Internet Explorer = The Internet. (The 
other 1% are just crazy)


Christian Montoya wrote:

On Tue, Sep 2, 2008 at 2:51 PM, Jens Brueckmann
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  

2008/9/2 Gregorio Espadas [EMAIL PROTECTED]:


I like the IE6Blocker from Chris Coyier, check it out at
http://css-tricks.com/ie-6-blocker-script/
  

ONLY if a web application absolutely relies on certain javascript
methods not available in old browsers may a user be warned about
difficulties in using this application. In these cases, detection
should be done by testing said methods, not by user agent sniffing.




Leave it to WSG to assume that Facebook.com is just another website.

Log into Facebook and profile your session with Firebug or a similar
Javascript tool. What you will soon find is that Facebook is one of
the most complex web applications out there today. It has a huge
number of AJAX  animation events throughout the many sections, as
well as a live chat feature similar to the one in Gmail. Just to give
you an example, Facebook has a continuously running presence monitor
that sends information via AJAX to the backend even as the logged-in
user is idle, to track and identify how users interact with the site.
One of the uses for this is to tell other users, with certainty, if
you are currently online.

Facebook has had a warning message on their homepage for a long time;
I remember seeing it at the beginning of this year. It's a way of
letting users know that some features of the site are bound to be
hindered because IE 6 is so outdated. I think this message went up
around the time that Facebook chat was released (April 2008), this is
why:

http://www.theangryhedgehog.com/2008/04/facebook-chat-and-ie-6.html

Currently, Facebook has a redesign of their site which is opt-in until
the testing period is over, which does not work with IE 6. It is well
understood that the new version features a lot more Javascript  AJAX
than the current design, and therefore, will take a while to make
compatible with IE 6, if at all. Facebook has not finished the opt-in,
testing period for their new design, so it is not correct to say that
they are downgrading support for IE 6. We can only say that if those
users are still blocked when the new design is actually released to
all users (which is scheduled to happen soon).

We might not agree with the way Facebook sniffs the user's browser,
but the point I am trying to make is that Facebook is far more a web
app than many people on this list may have ever known, and it
certainly does have different requirements than our blogs and
public-facing brochure sites. Also, since Facebook hasn't actually
finished their latest redesign, there is still a chance that they will
support IE 6 in the end; but I doubt it.

Last link:
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/google.com+myspace.com+facebook.com/?metric=uv

  



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Re: [WSG] resetting input boxes

2008-08-06 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Paul Bennett wrote:

Hi Kevin,

It's not clear what you're trying to achieve. Can you give us some more 
information?

Paul


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I think he's essentially talking about a CSS reset file, specific to 
input, to neutralize all of the browser differences.


I'm not sure of the specific elements, but just about any CSS reset 
should handle it. This is the one I prefer: 
http://meyerweb.com/eric/thoughts/2007/05/01/reset-reloaded/


Yahoo also has it's own, but it's a lot bigger and I think somewhat of 
an overkill.


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Re: [WSG] Marking up company logo

2008-05-30 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Thierry Koblentz wrote:

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Adam Martin
Sent: Friday, May 30, 2008 3:19 PM
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] Marking up company logo

img is only an inline element by default. Some simple css fixes that. An
inline element does not have to be contained in a block level element at
all!




You might need a containing element for the IMG element, this depends on
document type.


  
Additionally, using CSS to make an img -display- like a block only makes 
it act like a block level element. It doesn't mean it is a block-level 
element semantically.


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Re: [WSG] accessible client side form validation

2008-04-23 Thread Christian Snodgrass
You may want to try out one I created: 
http://www.arwebdesign.net/systems/ValidInputImages


It's primary function is to place a image after the object that 
indicates whether it is valid or invalid. It also has an alt tag that 
says so as well. The only requirement is that each element is wrapped in 
something that can handle an img, because it appends a new image. So, 
you could mark it up like this:

labelinput/label

or (as I've done in my examples because it's easier to apply CSS like this)

lilabel for=inputinput/label/li

It checks each element after each element has been changed.

Mine isn't quite as easy as Matt's, because it requires that you call a 
function for each input, and there aren't lots of regexes predefined. It 
is light-weight and has been tested on all current major browsers, 
including IE6.


The thing I'm not sure about, and that maybe others will be able to 
assist me with is what happens when the image gets appended or the 
source gets changed. It seems I remember hearing that anytime the source 
is changed, the screen reader jumps to the top again. If so, that's 
something that I need to figure out a good work around for.


Let me know what you think.

tee wrote:
Yes, I second it, I implement it on a client's site and was very happy 
with until I found that it has problem in Safari 3.1 (552513) for the 
First Name, Last Name and Phone required fields - I had the fields 
entered correctly, but Safari kept telling me to 'correct the 
highlighted errors'.


It's probably a bug by Safari 3.1 (552513) because I had people tested 
for me in their Safari with different version, and they all worked.


I was forced to remove Matt's script as a result, and have the 
server-side validation.


tee


On Apr 22, 2008, at 8:58 PM, Matt Fellows wrote:
I humbly suggest my own: 
http://www.onegeek.com.au/articles/programming/javascript-form-validation.php :) 

Completely unobtrusive and requires only valid XHTML. If you have a 
little bit of JS knowledge you can easily extend the functionality.


Cheers,

Matt





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Re: [WSG] PNG file sizes

2008-04-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Fireworks also has some really nice optimization tools for all formats.

Rachel May wrote:

Thanks for your replies everyone - I'll check out those tools.

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Nikita The Spider The Spider
Sent: Thursday, 17 April 2008 1:55 a.m.
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] PNG file sizes

On Wed, Apr 16, 2008 at 1:56 AM, Ca Phun Ung [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  

Mike Brown wrote:



Rachel May wrote:

  

I created the PNGs in Photoshop (CS3) and just wondering if there are


any better tools or ways of saving the PNGs for smaller file size, while
still retaining their high quality??


http://www.ignite-it.co.uk/

Best. Graphics. Optimiser. PlugIn.


  

 I use PNGGauntlet as an after process to optimize those PNGs.

 http://brh.numbera.com/software/pnggauntlet/

 Unfortunately it only supports Windows.



The Gimp (graphics editor) has PngCrush built into its save routine.
You could also run PngCrush separately, I guess, but I never have
because I always use The Gimp.

Also, PngQuant runs on *nix boxes (and Windows?) and allows you to
reduce the palette size of PNGs. Save a PNG as indexed and then tell
PngQuant to rerender the PNG with a fixed palette size (up to 256
entries, I think) and it will dither any colors that don't fit in the
palette. You can try with different palette sizes to see what tradeoff
of size/quality works for you.

Enjoy



  



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Re: [WSG] Catch 22 list problem

2008-04-03 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I know this is a fairly old topic, but it's come up several times and I 
don't know if this solution has ever been stated before:


You can actually set the value attribute for the li elements with 
the number you want it to have. After that, all succeeding lis will be 
numbered based on that one.


Check the bottom of this link for details:
http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/lists.html#h-10.2

(For those that don't remember, this discussion was about starting an 
ordered list at a number other than one.)


Jason Friesen wrote:
That's pretty much what we did; usually hx and p, with ul where 
appropriate.  But I still look longingly at the counters in CSS, and 
grimace everytime someone says, But we have to add in another point 
between 2 and 3...



On 2007-Oct-14, at 14:10 , [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Certainly for this example, the use of an ordered list is incorrect - 
there is a strong hint there in the description; this should be 
marked up with p tags, with the identifier as the first bit of 
text, ie the number is content in this example.
If you think about it, the 'label' of each item MUST remain the same, 
regardless of how much or little of the document is quoted, and more 
to the point adding or removing content MUST NOT alter the numbering. 
This is the exact opposite of what an OL is intended to do.


Mike





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Re: [WSG] Why is u deprecated?

2008-03-27 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I think that b and i are equivalent to u and that they probably 
should be deprecated. They probably will be in HTML5 (though I haven't 
looked). In my opinion, those are purely style, not semantic, and should 
be done with CSS.


Joseph Ortenzi wrote:

Very good points

b and i are stylistic and em and strong are semantic.
u is stylistic, but the intention of an underlined string of text 
can be expressed with any of the above, dependent on intention.


I am one of those severely frustrated people who want to click 
underlined text so keep it out please...


I like underline on hover as useful feedback that it is in fact, a 
link. Predefined standard colours are less important these days, but 
good design does seem to favour blue-ish for link as a convention.


Joe


On Mar 27, 2008, at 09:14, Stuart Foulstone wrote:


Hi,

Usability.
Users expect link-text to be underlined.  Many user studies found that
when you underline other text users try to click on it and get quite
annoyed when nothing happens (some users would click on the underlined
text several times before they gave up).

Originally links were to have predefined colours that would have avoided
this situation, but Web Designers thought better and decided to start
styling their link colours as they thought fit.  Even though this 
styling
often does not include underlining, users still expect underlined 
text to
mean links.  This led to the confusion, so something had to give - it 
was

u.

b and i are not deprecated because there may be times when you 
want to
style the text in that way but without the semantic emphasis that 
em and

strong confer.


On Thu, March 27, 2008 4:28 am, Kepler Gelotte wrote:

Hi,

I am just curious if anyone can explain why the u tag has been
deprecated
while b and i are still allowed.

Thanks in advance.

Best regards,
Kepler Gelotte
Neighbor Webmaster, Inc.
156 Normandy Dr., Piscataway, NJ 08854
www.neighborwebmaster.com
phone/fax: (732) 302-0904



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==
Joe Ortenzi
[EMAIL PROTECTED]




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Re: [WSG] IE8 news

2008-03-05 Thread Christian Snodgrass
That's very true. Those that our party of the community are those that 
are aware and follow standards. And, I do disagree with compatibility 
indefinitely, such as having IE5's, or even IE6's rendering engine 
within IE8, because that does cause bloat. But, I can understand having 
IE7s, because not every developer is going to even feasibly be able to 
update all of their updates in between the beta of IE8 and the actual 
release, and even then it might completely update their site for when 
IE8 comes out. Likewise, when IE9 comes out, if it's rendering 
capabilities change for HTML compared to IE8, I would expect IE9 to 
contain IE8's rendering engine, but likely drop IE7 (depending how 
quickly they pushed it out). You have to have some 
backwards-compatibility, but you have to eventually drop some of it if 
you ever want to progress.


Patrick Lauke wrote:

Tate Johnson



  
I agree with your latter point. However, I fear that it 
protects lazy  
developers who refuse to adopt standards based practices. That said,  
the more and more you look at the community on the whole; it seems  
less ignorant today than at the start of the decade.



The problem is that those lazy or ignorant developers are *not* actually
part of the community...they may not even realise that there *is* a community.

P

Patrick H. Lauke
Web Editor
Enterprise  Development
University of Salford
Room 113, Faraday House
Salford, Greater Manchester
M5 4WT
UK

T +44 (0) 161 295 4779
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

www.salford.ac.uk

A GREATER MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY  



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Re: [WSG] strong element being more semantical and accessible for required field

2008-02-26 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Something quick I just thought of was that you could use some small icon 
to indicate required fields, and specify the alt for that to say 
required. That way, sighted users don't have to look at the word 
required repeated 50 times, while unsighted users will be able to hear 
that the field is required. Just a thought.


Steven Faulkner wrote:
don't know if this has been pointed out yet, but as far as screen 
readers like JAWS and Window Eyes are concerned the strong element 
does not convey any meaning. It is not recognised by them.
 
They do not change the way text within strong elements are announced, 
but neither do they do it for em or b or i etc.
 
JAWS does have a speech and sound scheme that includes modified 
announements of italicised or bolded  text (amogst other things), this 
is not a default scheme, though and is provided for tasks such as 
proofreading. but this facility is based on how the text is rendered 
on screen, not on how it is marked up. 
 
bottom line is that for users these screen readers using strong as an 
indication of a required field won't be of any help.
 
On 25/02/2008, *tee* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


I have this question about strong element being more semantical and
accessible for required field in the web form and like to hear your
opinion.

I came to the conclusion after conducting my little user testing - it
first started with an intention of spam and error monitoring over the
form script I use, I then learned that despite the indication that
asterisk is marked as  required field, many people who took time to
submit the forms on clients' sites  still missed the *.  Because I
use no JS validation for the form, I decided to bold the required
field using strong element for two new sites. It seems working as the
bold texts caught people attention and I received no errors email
notification on missing to enter requried fields. The result also gave
me a though on how screen readers treat the strong element and that
it's indeed more accessible and semantically correct.

Working on a site, and thanks to Matt Fellows and his futher
assistance, I implemented his JS form validation script to the web
form. Using asterik  to indicate the required field no longer is an
issue with JS validation, however I decided to stick with the strong
element. Much work had put into it to modify the code and css, but
client came back to me to want the '*' over the strong because it's
a conventional practice.

Really want to stick with the strong element for the reason above,
however I am also doubting  my conclusion that it's more accessible
for screen readers as I never tested on one. Before I try to convince
client the strong element is better approach, I would love to hear
your opinion.

Thank you!

tee


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with regards

Steve Faulkner
Technical Director - TPG Europe
Director - Web Accessibility Tools Consortium

www.paciellogroup.com http://www.paciellogroup.com | www.wat-c.org 
http://www.wat-c.org
Web Accessibility Toolbar - 
http://www.paciellogroup.com/resources/wat-ie-about.html

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Re: [WSG] repeating background png support ie6

2008-02-19 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Instead of that, you could just use a CSS hack. Something like:
#background_div {
   background-image: url(background.png);
}

* html #background_div {
   background-image: url(background.gif);
}

The * html will make it so only only versions of IE will look at it 
(IE6), while modern browsers remain unaffected. Also, I'm fairly 
certain this will prevent the background.gif image from being loaded in 
modern browsers, since it isn't needed.


kevin mcmonagle wrote:

Hi,
Whats the standards way to handle or degrade ie6 png support for a 
repeating background img?
Im having problems solving this-ies4mac doesn't seem to do well with 
conditional comments and png hacks-so i cant tell whats working.


Im thinking about putting the wrapper div with the repeating 
background image in two different stylesheets. One with a png for 
normal browsers and one with a gif for ie then i would just hide the 
png from ie6 and give it the gif one  with conditional comments.


Also if anyone can email me a screen shot from ie6 off list that would 
be great.


beta page:

http://www.arasgcc.com/indextest.html

-thanks
kevin







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Re: [WSG] Styling forms

2008-02-09 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Thierry Koblentz wrote:

On Behalf Of Mike at Green-Beast.com




As a side note, I style these BRs with display:none.
  

I'm curious, what effect does that have on the styled page?Do you do
something like...

label {
  display : block;
}

br {
  display : none;
}



Hi Mike,

I don't use display:block, most of the time I float everything and use the 
label to clear.
Depending on the width of the labels I may use text-align:right; to move the 
text in the label toward the text box.
I also set the widths in EMs, to avoid the text to wrap if it grows. With the fieldset width set in pixels, when these elements grow, they simply pile up without breaking anything. 
If I kill the BRs it is just to make sure they don't create any vertical space.



  
That sounds like quite an elegant solution. I may have to try that out. 
Thanks.


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Re: [WSG] Styling forms

2008-02-07 Thread Christian Snodgrass
]
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Re: [WSG] Styling forms

2008-02-06 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Yes, the only difference between between the input in the label and 
having it outside of the label with the for attribute set is primarily 
just some formatting via CSS differences. Beyond that, there is little 
difference. All modern browsers (and even most older ones) allow you to 
click on the label to put your focus in the input that that the label is 
referenced to, regardless of which way it is implemented.


Thomas Thomassen wrote:
When the LABEL element wraps around INPUT you do not need the FOR 
attribute.The hierarchy provides the connection between them. However, 
when the LABEL does not wrap around the INPUT, the FOR attribute is 
required for useragent to know the elements are related.



- Original Message - From: John Faulds 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2008 7:42 AM
Subject: Re: [WSG] Styling forms


Hi Germ17,I have seen your example presented in GERMWORKS.NETFYI, 
your approach is perfect to my knowledge, but the INPUT element 
should not wrapped by any LABEL element. It's not 
compliant/accessible...I request you to modify this example 
according to standards, if you believe

the same.


You're wrong there. It's perfectly valid HTML and I don't believe it 
is any less accessible as long as the 'for' attribute is specified.



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Mb: 0405 678 590


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Re: [WSG] repeat x and repeat y

2008-02-06 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I second the recommendation on The Art  Science of CSS, it is 
excellent. The CSS Anthology is also an excellent CSS book (also from 
Sitepoint).


Darren Lovelock wrote:

Two books I would recommend -

Designing with Web Standards - Jeffrey Zeldman
The Art  Science of CSS - Sitepoint 


Hope this helps :)

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of David Laakso
Sent: 06 February 2008 16:37
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] repeat x and repeat y

Michael Horowitz wrote:
  
I again thank everyone for all the help.  Any good resources for 
repeat x and repeat y


Also would love suggestions for new books to buy.





See:

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/colors.html#background-properties
http://css-discuss.incutio.com/?page=GoodBooks

~dL


--
http://chelseacreekstudio.com/



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Re: [WSG] PHP includes

2008-02-05 Thread Christian Snodgrass
You can basically think of a PHP include as basically just copying 
everything from the included file into the file it is being included in.


Ken Robinson wrote:

Quoting Michael Horowitz [EMAIL PROTECTED]:


If I am including a menu using the PHP include command but the actuual
menu is an html list does the included file need to have its code
including the css style sheet or will it use the style sheet of the
page it is included to.



Any text that's in the PHP include file that is not PHP code is passed 
directly to the browser as part of the HTML code. Therefore it does 
not need it's own CSS style sheet.


Ken



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Re: [WSG] display differences firefox ie 7.0

2008-02-05 Thread Christian Snodgrass

In wrapper, change the margin to be:
margin: 0 auto;

To center block-level elements, you set margin-left: auto and 
margin-right: auto (margin: 0 auto is a shortcut for that). In IE, at 
least IE6, it wrongfully would let you use text-align: center to 
position block level elements. Not sure about IE7. FF only lets you use 
the margin method.


Michael Horowitz wrote:
I've noticed that my site is centered it ie 7.0 but left justified in 
firefox http://terrorfreeamerica.us/.  What are the issues and 
workarounds to keep them in sync. In this case I would like it 
centered both ways but I would love to know how to do it either way.


Thanks




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Re: [WSG] Styling forms

2008-02-05 Thread Christian Snodgrass
It kind of depends on the form itself. Definition lists and unordered 
lists also are used a lot.


Usually, I would say unordered or definition lists are the most 
appropriate. If the questions were numbered, I could see using ordered 
lists. Paragraphs are kind of the lazy way. You can also use field sets, 
which are really appropriate for groups of related items.

Michael Horowitz wrote:
I've been looking at styling forms and I'm seeing some people mark 
them up as ordered lists and other using paragraphs.  What are the 
arguments for the different markup types. 



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Re: [WSG] long description and its implementation

2008-02-03 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Mostly empirical evidence, though I've read it in many reliable sources.

Patrick H. Lauke wrote:

Christian Snodgrass wrote:
(Most screen readers don't have Javascript enabled, so this is a 
valid method).


Just wondering if this is based on stats or empirical evidence?

P



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Re: [WSG] long description and its implementation

2008-02-03 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Maybe I'm confused. Do they usually have Flash installed? I thought that 
screen readers would default to whatever is suppose to be replaced with 
the Flash when using SWFObject. Maybe it defaults because the Flash 
isn't enabled... Though, I guess that could be wrong as well.


Steve Green wrote:

Such as?

JAWS (which has something like 50% market share) has a high level of
JavaScript support and I believe that the other professional screen readers
(WindowEyes and HAL/SuperNova) also do. Free and cheap screen readers
generally don't have JavaScript support.

In our experience screen reader users do not turn off JavaScript. In fact
they tend to use pretty much all software as it comes out of the box without
any customisation. The one exception is Windows itself, where it is
beneficial to enable Classic mode and make a few other adjustments,
especially in Vista.

Steve


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of Christian Snodgrass
Sent: 04 February 2008 03:06
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] long description and its implementation

Mostly empirical evidence, though I've read it in many reliable sources.

Patrick H. Lauke wrote:
  

Christian Snodgrass wrote:

(Most screen readers don't have Javascript enabled, so this is a 
valid method).
  

Just wondering if this is based on stats or empirical evidence?

P




  



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Re: [WSG] long description and its implementation

2008-02-03 Thread Christian Snodgrass

It looks like longdesc is only a valid attribute for images.

You could use Javascript (with something like SWFObject) to place the 
Flash movie. How most work (including SWFObject) is that they actually 
replace another element (usually div) to place the Flash. That means, if 
Javascript isn't enabled, the original contents of the div are left in 
tack. You could put what you would put in a longdesc in this initial 
div, and then replace it with Flash for those that have Javascript 
enabled. (Most screen readers don't have Javascript enabled, so this is 
a valid method).


This is pretty much the standard method for having (almost) accessible 
Flash.


Susie Gardner-Brown wrote:

A further query on the longdesc attribute.

Is there any reason why I couldn’t use it on a Flash animation? It’d 
be a great solution for a current problem where I’m trying to update 
an oldish website to be more accessible. I’ve got a Flash animation 
that’s a list of (6) headings, each with 3 options (advantage, 
disadvantage, strategy) that are accessed by clicking on an icon (18 
in total). I was going to convert it to a table but maybe I could 
leave it as the Flash animation and have a longdesc link?


Any thoughts?

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Re: [WSG] long description and its implementation

2008-02-02 Thread Christian Snodgrass
If that is the case, you could just use simple links and have a mention 
about clicking on the artwork to read an in-depth description.


dwain wrote:
i do go into some detail about color meanings and the symbolism behind 
the work, so i think that it could be of benefit to both sighted and 
visually challenged individuals.

dwain

On 2/2/08, *Thierry Koblentz* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


 On Behalf Of dwain

 excellent suggestion!!  i have other plans for the page with the
larger image as far as a description goes, but the link text
suggestion is
 superb.  i wanted a way to let screen readers know that there
was a description of the image for non-sighted, blind, whatever is
politically
 correct these days, available for accessibility.

If these links are for screen-reader users, then why not hiding
them in visual browsers?
imho, many sighted users will be confused by your long description
pages, I believe most users won't understand their purpose.
Unless of course they do more than describing the image. For
example, in the case these images are not only described, but
*interpreted* (for example by the artist explaining his work,
symbolic, etc).
If it is the latter, then the description is for all users.

--
Regards,
Thierry | http://www.TJKDesign.com






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dwain alford
The artist may use any form which his expression demands;
for his inner impulse must find suitable expression.  Kandinsky
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Re: [WSG] Re: Why code and no web pag

2008-02-02 Thread Christian Snodgrass
This isn't really the place to discuss this as it has nothing to do with 
web standards, but it is because you can't have an include using an 
absolute path, they must all be relative. 
http://www.example.com/page.php is absolute. /page.php is relative.


Hayden's Harness Attachment wrote:

Solved the problem. However, why does;

include ../crf_header.php;

Will work and;

include http://www.choroideremia.org/crf_header.php;

Will not?

Angus MacKinnon
Infoforce Services
http:ééwww.infoforce-services.com

It is impossible to rightly govern the world without God and the Bible.
George Washington



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Re: [WSG] long description and its implementation

2008-02-01 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Longdesc is actually an attribute. It's most commonly used with the img 
element, though it works for several other multimedia-related options.


Basically, you just add the attribute to your img tag, and then the 
value of the longdesc attribute is the path to the longdesc file.


Here is something I found about longdesc: 
http://www.w3.org/WAI/wcag-curric/sam3-0.htm


And here it is in the objects, images, and applets section of the W3C 
specification:

http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/objects.html#adef-longdesc-IMG

Hope that helps.

dwain wrote:
i have looked at the html 4.01 specs and i did not see any examples of 
how to implement the longdesc element.  i am working on long 
descriptions on separate pages for each work of art on my web site.  i 
am planning on placing a D link next to the text title of the work 
on the main category page.  could someone point me in the direction 
to any other references as to the proper implementation of the 
longdesc element?  maybe someone would provide a standards compliant 
example?


tia,
dwain

--
dwain alford
The artist may use any form which his expression demands;
for his inner impulse must find suitable expression.  Kandinsky
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Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy

2008-01-31 Thread Christian Snodgrass
When IE8 comes out, no, we won't be able to ignore IE7, and most likely 
not even IE6 yet. However, eventually, IE6 and IE7 will fade away, just 
like IE5 did.


James Leslie wrote:
 
  

It is the best solution they can come up with that won't destroy
  

everything that has been created in the past. Adding one line of code to
each of your pages is a lot more cost effective and time saving then all
of the hacks we currently have to do to get it to display properly in
IE6 and IE7.

---

But by this argument, you seem to think that we would no longer have to
support IE6 or 7 and not have to spend the time putting hacks in. These
browsers will still be around for a long time... Perhaps not so much IE7
but certainly IE6 due to older OS not being able to update.

My development plan will stay the same aside from having another browser
to check:

Code site in Firefox
Check in Opera, Safari, PLUS IE8 (standards mode)
Hack IE7 fixes
Hack IE6 fixes

Or alternatively I let IE8 act like IE7 and don't bother using an
updated engine as an updated engine. The only difference between now and
then in the above plan is that I would check IE8 standards mode and hope
that it renders the same as firefox, safari and other standards based
browsers. I may be missing something, but I really don't see where the
less work comes in for anyone who is coding to standards. For those who
have been churning out badly coded sites that don't work properly in
firefox/opera/etc and have always been coding for IE it is a blessing.
It is not so much about 'not breaking the web', as not breaking the
sites already breaking the web.

James



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Re: [WSG] Windows on a Mac

2008-01-31 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Check out this: http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/bootcamp.html

Tim MacKay wrote:


Hi List,

If this discussion is outside the scope of this group I apologize, I 
know it was touched on a couple of weeks ago. Please email me off list 
if you feel it’s more appropriate.


I’ve recently had my laptop stolen and am trying to get back on track 
as soon as possible, it was a Mac iBook from2005, and as I’ve gone a 
bit deeper into web development since I purchased it I was under the 
impression that when I upgrade I should change over to Windows. My 
current situation has forced me to consider upgrading sooner than 
expected, so I have a few questions about the Windows environment on 
the new Macs. Specifically, can I run things like Microsoft Visual 
Studio? Flash Develop? Can I download and run .exe files? Is the 
Windows environment on Macintosh a true Windows environment and is it 
just a matter of switching OS’s like I would switch applications?


Thanks in advance for any advice offered, I am going to dig up the 
previous threads on this topic from the last few weeks.


Cheers,

Tim


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Re: [WSG] Windows on a Mac

2008-01-31 Thread Christian Snodgrass
On an Intel-based processor, you should be able to actually install 
Windows onto a Mac machine. I've never personally tested this, but it 
makes sense to me. If that is the case, then it will function just like 
Windows on any other PC build, so you can run anything that you would 
normally run.


Another option is virtual machines, where you can run Windows from 
within a Mac OS. In this case, it would be just like another program you 
are running, although from within that virtual Windows you can do 
anything that you could with a normal installation of Windows.


Sorry to here about your laptop.

Tim MacKay wrote:


Hi List,

If this discussion is outside the scope of this group I apologize, I 
know it was touched on a couple of weeks ago. Please email me off list 
if you feel it’s more appropriate.


I’ve recently had my laptop stolen and am trying to get back on track 
as soon as possible, it was a Mac iBook from2005, and as I’ve gone a 
bit deeper into web development since I purchased it I was under the 
impression that when I upgrade I should change over to Windows. My 
current situation has forced me to consider upgrading sooner than 
expected, so I have a few questions about the Windows environment on 
the new Macs. Specifically, can I run things like Microsoft Visual 
Studio? Flash Develop? Can I download and run .exe files? Is the 
Windows environment on Macintosh a true Windows environment and is it 
just a matter of switching OS’s like I would switch applications?


Thanks in advance for any advice offered, I am going to dig up the 
previous threads on this topic from the last few weeks.


Cheers,

Tim


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Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy

2008-01-30 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Yes, I agree.

Part of our job is putting up with the stupidity that MS gives us and 
making it work. We don't just get to say No, we won't support IE 
anymore, at least, not if you plan on keeping clients.


Is this solution perfect? No. Is this solution acceptable? Yes. Could it 
be worse? Hell yes!


Be thankful we are finally getting some standards compliance. Don't 
waste your time complaining about what they aren't doing.


It's one line... one. Not two, not ten. Just one. It is even a fairly 
standards-compliant way. It is not perfect, but it is a decent solution 
at least. When HTML5 is released, in another decade or so, we won't need 
the meta-tag anymore because Microsoft won't have to be making up for 
all of the old sites that were hacked to work with their browser. They 
have a chance to conform to standards from the start, and, after recent 
events, probably will. However, they can't do anything else for 
HTML4/XHTML1. They've dug their own grave with this one. It's our job 
now to not let our clients and their customers suffer for Microsoft's 
short-comings.


Thomas Thomassen wrote:
By the sound of it, IE9 will default to IE7 for documents with proper 
strict doctype and IE6 for documents with invalid or missing doctype. 
Just like IE8.


Regarding what you said about X-IE9-Compatible, X-IE10-Compatible:
No, it would be
meta http-equiv=X-UA-Compatible content=IE=9 /
if the site was made for IE9, and
meta http-equiv=X-UA-Compatible content=IE=10 /
the http-equip header name itself would not need to be replaced.

And your proposed solution is a punishment to the users and the owners 
of the sites. And the owners will loose money if their sites suddently 
break due to missing visitors and having to pay someone to sort it out.
It doesn't sound fair to do this to the owners and users because 
they're the ones that'll suffer the most. And we are after all 
offering a service.



- Original Message - From: James Bennett 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2008 9:03 AM
Subject: Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy



On Jan 30, 2008 1:31 AM, Thomas Thomassen [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
They don't want to default to IE8 rendering because of what happend 
with

IE7. It broke website. Not only that but IE is used so much outside the
browser as well. It's a platform. Intranet apps. HTA apps. Even help 
files

uses the IE engine. If IE8 defaulted to IE8 rendering, then you risk
breaking ALL of that. And who's going to get the heat for that? The
developers! Us!


And then when IE9 comes out, what does it default to? The same people
who built stuff that relied on IE6 bugs and broke in IE7 will build
stuff that relies on IE8 bugs and breaks in IE9 (especially since IE8
will be the first version with any support for the HTML 5 drafts; like
any first implementation of anything, there will be bugs). And so on
into the future; do we get an X-IE9-Compatible and an
X-IE10-Compatible, and an X-IE11-Compatible down the line to deal with
that?

When I first heard of this new tag I didn't know what to think of 
it. But

I'm starting to like it more and more. What I've yet to hear from from
people who don't like the solution is a realistic alternative. 
Letting the

sites break is not an alternative.


Well, there are three groups here:

1. Standards-based developers who don't rely on browser bugs to make
their stuff work.
2. Standards-based developers who do rely on browser bugs to make
their stuff work.
3. Developers who don't use standards-based techniques at all.

Group 1 doesn't need X-UA-Compatible because they don't have the
problem it allegedly solves.

Group 3 doesn't need X-UA-Compatible because they have quirks mode.

Group 2 are the only ones who need it, but by accepting it they're
giving up on the ability to use any new features down the road (since,
to kick future IE versions into a more featureful standards mode,
they'd have to stop relying on old bugs).

So the solution is to make Group 2 stop existing, and all that's
really needed is for browser vendors to do nothing special to cater to
them; the simple market force of clients who want functioning web
sites will sort things out all on its own by either giving Group 2 an
incentive to change its ways, or putting them out of business.


--
Bureaucrat Conrad, you are technically correct -- the best kind of 
correct.



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Christian

Re: [WSG] Windows on a Mac

2008-01-30 Thread Christian Snodgrass
On an Intel-based processor, you should be able to actually install 
Windows onto a Mac machine. I've never personally tested this, but it 
makes sense to me. If that is the case, then it will function just like 
Windows on any other PC build, so you can run anything that you would 
normally run.


Another option is virtual machines, where you can run Windows from 
within a Mac OS. In this case, it would be just like another program you 
are running, although from within that virtual Windows you can do 
anything that you could with a normal installation of Windows.


Sorry to here about your laptop.

Tim MacKay wrote:


Hi List,

If this discussion is outside the scope of this group I apologize, I 
know it was touched on a couple of weeks ago. Please email me off list 
if you feel it’s more appropriate.


I’ve recently had my laptop stolen and am trying to get back on track 
as soon as possible, it was a Mac iBook from2005, and as I’ve gone a 
bit deeper into web development since I purchased it I was under the 
impression that when I upgrade I should change over to Windows. My 
current situation has forced me to consider upgrading sooner than 
expected, so I have a few questions about the Windows environment on 
the new Macs. Specifically, can I run things like Microsoft Visual 
Studio? Flash Develop? Can I download and run .exe files? Is the 
Windows environment on Macintosh a true Windows environment and is it 
just a matter of switching OS’s like I would switch applications?


Thanks in advance for any advice offered, I am going to dig up the 
previous threads on this topic from the last few weeks.


Cheers,

Tim


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Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] Windows on a Mac

2008-01-30 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Check out this: http://www.apple.com/macosx/features/bootcamp.html

Tim MacKay wrote:


Hi List,

If this discussion is outside the scope of this group I apologize, I 
know it was touched on a couple of weeks ago. Please email me off list 
if you feel it’s more appropriate.


I’ve recently had my laptop stolen and am trying to get back on track 
as soon as possible, it was a Mac iBook from2005, and as I’ve gone a 
bit deeper into web development since I purchased it I was under the 
impression that when I upgrade I should change over to Windows. My 
current situation has forced me to consider upgrading sooner than 
expected, so I have a few questions about the Windows environment on 
the new Macs. Specifically, can I run things like Microsoft Visual 
Studio? Flash Develop? Can I download and run .exe files? Is the 
Windows environment on Macintosh a true Windows environment and is it 
just a matter of switching OS’s like I would switch applications?


Thanks in advance for any advice offered, I am going to dig up the 
previous threads on this topic from the last few weeks.


Cheers,

Tim


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Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy

2008-01-29 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Chris Knowles wrote:

Chris Broadfoot wrote:

Chris Knowles wrote:
  I don't see how opting-in to standards by adding a meta tag does
  anything for me or anyone else. Except for Microsoft of course, by
  allowing them to do the right thing at last and create a decent 
browser
  while at the same time not doing the right thing and ignoring the 
mess

  they created.
 

I don't think they're ignoring the mess they created at all.. Is 
adding a meta tag really too much work to provide your users/visitors 
the viewing experience they should have?




Yeah actually I agree, they're not ignoring the mess. Just actively 
covering it up by enlisting yours and my support.


My users/visitors should get the right viewing experience by default, 
not by having to opt-in. On the contrary, if you wish your 
users/visitors to NOT get the right viewing experience, is opting-out 
by adding a meta tag really too much work?


The biggest problem is the fact that if they don't have it be the 
opt-in option, that any older sites that used all of the hacks that 
made it work in IE6 and IE7 won't work in IE8. That probably includes 
even a lot of your own sites. Beyond that (since they could just make it 
ignore those types of hacks which wouldn't be difficult), is pages even 
older, and especially those web-based applications that relied on those 
hacks.


It's the lesser of two evils, but it's still a huge pain.
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Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/ http://www.arwebdesign.net
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy

2008-01-29 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Well said.

Another thing is, as much as everyone gripes and moans, you can't just 
start ignoring IE. Well, I guess you could, but then you'd miss about 
50% of your possible audience. That would probably tick some clients off.


It is the best solution they can come up with that won't destroy 
everything that has been created in the past. Adding one line of code to 
each of your pages is a lot more cost effective and time saving then all 
of the hacks we currently have to do to get it to display properly in 
IE6 and IE7.


While it'd be nice for MS to completely fix their problem, they'd have 
to go back in time. There are just too many existing pages that would 
utterly fail if IE8 didn't render how it will by default, many of those 
being expensive corporate web-based software.


Jermayn Parker wrote:

Just keep the website to look and behave right in IE7 then!
and create every new website or important/ re-designed websites with the new 
target IE8 tags!

sounds quite simple to me.
Maybe not the most perfect but you cannot expect everything to jump over night!


  

Christian Snodgrass [EMAIL PROTECTED] 30/01/2008 9:15:48 am 


Chris Knowles wrote:
  

Chris Broadfoot wrote:


Chris Knowles wrote:
  I don't see how opting-in to standards by adding a meta tag does
  anything for me or anyone else. Except for Microsoft of course, by
  allowing them to do the right thing at last and create a decent 
browser
  while at the same time not doing the right thing and ignoring the 
mess

  they created.
 

I don't think they're ignoring the mess they created at all.. Is 
adding a meta tag really too much work to provide your users/visitors 
the viewing experience they should have?


  
Yeah actually I agree, they're not ignoring the mess. Just actively 
covering it up by enlisting yours and my support.


My users/visitors should get the right viewing experience by default, 
not by having to opt-in. On the contrary, if you wish your 
users/visitors to NOT get the right viewing experience, is opting-out 
by adding a meta tag really too much work?



The biggest problem is the fact that if they don't have it be the 
opt-in option, that any older sites that used all of the hacks that 
made it work in IE6 and IE7 won't work in IE8. That probably includes 
even a lot of your own sites. Beyond that (since they could just make it 
ignore those types of hacks which wouldn't be difficult), is pages even 
older, and especially those web-based applications that relied on those 
hacks.


It's the lesser of two evils, but it's still a huge pain.
  



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Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/ http://www.arwebdesign.net
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Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy

2008-01-29 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Chris Knowles wrote:

Christian Snodgrass wrote:

The biggest problem is the fact that if they don't have it be the 
opt-in option, that any older sites that used all of the hacks that 
made it work in IE6 and IE7 won't work in IE8. That probably includes 
even a lot of your own sites. Beyond that (since they could just make 
it ignore those types of hacks which wouldn't be difficult), is pages 
even older, and especially those web-based applications that relied 
on those hacks.


It's the lesser of two evils, but it's still a huge pain.



If you have a web-based application that will break in IE8, then whats 
so wrong with adding an HTTP header or a meta tag to say 'use IE7' ?




What's so wrong with adding a tag that says use IE8?

Plus, not everyone will know this. I doubt that when you open up IE8 
there will be this popup that says Hello, if you are a web developer, 
please add a meta tag to any existing documents that you have created 
that rely on the rendering prior to IE8, because they will now fail. 
Existing software is more difficult to update then to slightly modify 
the way you create new software.


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Azure Ronin Web Design
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Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy

2008-01-29 Thread Christian Snodgrass

There is another possible outcome which is positive.

It's more likely (assuming they get the info about the meta-tag out 
there) that new sites will be developed using this meta-tag and 
standards-compliance. Eventually, the old sites will be replaced with 
new ones built in this fashion. Then, when they finally just drop the 
non-standards-compliance all together, fewer sites will break. They may 
be hoping for that outcome.


Katrina wrote:

Patrick H. Lauke wrote:

Karl Lurman wrote:


I think the thing to remember here is that, over time, the older
browsers will be phased out.



Jokes aside. As the older browsers FINALLY become less important,
YEARS from now, they can eliminate the meta-tag altogether.


But the crappy intranet sites etc that are coded specifically to IE6 
or IE7's quirks *won't* go away (as that's the whole reason why MS 
are doing this), so no, the meta tag (and the associated rendering 
engine) will stay. If they're freezing rendering unless you opt-in 
because corporates won't update the sites now, what makes you think 
that they will ever update the sites? Come IE9, the argument will be 
the same: since IE8 rendered as IE7 by default, we can't now default 
to standards in IE9 because it would break the sites that didn't have 
to be updated last time around because of the switch...so, the switch 
stays.


P


I agree. But eventually MS are going to get sick of maintaining a 
rendering engine, I guess IE7 first, and then stop supporting it.


Then they will 'break' the web. All they will have done is delayed 
'breaking' the web.


And because of the delay and the meta-tag, more developers will have 
grown complacent and lazy (coding for just that rendering engine*), 
and so the number of sites that will 'break' will have increased.


Kat
* who can blame them? It's the easy way out.



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Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] This IE8 controversy

2008-01-29 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Chris Broadfoot wrote:

Christian Snodgrass wrote:

The biggest problem is the fact that if they don't have it be the 
opt-in option, that any older sites that used all of the hacks that 
made it work in IE6 and IE7 won't work in IE8. That probably includes 
even a lot of your own sites. Beyond that (since they could just make 
it ignore those types of hacks which wouldn't be difficult), is pages 
even older, and especially those web-based applications that relied 
on those hacks.


It's the lesser of two evils, but it's still a huge pain.


Didn't people use conditional comments?

Chris


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There are various CSS hacks which are only noticed by either =IE6 or 
=IE7, etc. which could cause some problems if these, essentially, bugs 
aren't corrected.

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Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/ http://www.arwebdesign.net
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] Usability for downloading documents

2008-01-28 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Wording that would be really tricky, because if they're default action 
is to download it, when they hit Read they'd expect it to just open, 
not offer them a download prompt. There are a lot of people that would 
be agitated that both buttons do the same thing.


Rochester oliveira wrote:
I think that you should make 2 buttons. The user will choice for 
download or just read the documment

[]'s

-
Rochester Oliveira
http://webbemfeita.com/
Viva a Web-Bem-Feita
Web Designer
Curitiba - PR - Brasil
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Re: [WSG] Conflict between Mime Type and Document Type

2008-01-28 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Usually, it is something simple like trying to use a DOCTYPE of XHTML, 
with the extension html or whatever, and your server is, in reality, 
serving it up as text/html. Basically, you need to make sure that your 
server either: a) assumes no MIME type, or b) use an extension like 
.xhtml and tell it to serve it as text/xhtml+xml. However, be warned 
that IE7 (and all before, and likely IE8) do not actually support 
text/xhtml+xml, so it will completely fail when presented to the end-user.


If it is some other DOCTYPE you are using that is getting the error 
(other then XHTML) let us know.


Andrew Freedman wrote:

G'day,

I see this warning often when using the W3C validator and figured I 
must be doing something wrong, but as it is a warning I never bothered 
looking into it.


Now I've seen it on the results from this site so it has roused my 
curiosity.


Can some explain to me why this is occurring and how it is overcome.

Thanks.
Andrew


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Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] A Question of Semantics

2008-01-26 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Yes I do, it's not finished yet.

Joe Ortenzi wrote:

Christian.

Did you know most of your portfolio goes to a 404?


On Jan 24 2008, at 16:06, Christian Snodgrass wrote:


Hello,

I have a small semantic problem that I can't make up my mind about. 
Basically, I have a list like this: Something: blah blah; blah; 
blah. The Something: is a different font size, and kind of a 
header for the list. I can't decide if I should just do a paragraph 
with Something strong or in a span, or if I should do a header and 
then the text in a paragraph, with some CSS to make it look properly, 
or if I should make it some kind of definition or other list.


What do you think?

Thanks.
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Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/ http://www.arwebdesign.net
Phone: 859.816.7955



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[EMAIL PROTECTED] mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
www.joiz.com



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Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

2008-01-25 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I actually found a nice image-enabled testing script which works well: 
http://webgeekblog.com/2007/04/15/unobtrusive-javascript-for-detecting-whether-images-are-enabled-or-not/


I tried using the onload even, but that will still go off even if images 
are disabled.


Thomas Thomassen wrote:
You could make the javascript trigger on the image onload events. 
Though, I think some older version of Opera, v8 or 7.54, doesn't 
support the onLoad event for images.



- Original Message - From: Christian Snodgrass 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2008 12:43 AM
Subject: Re: [WSG] Background images versus image



That script has two flaws that reduce it's user base:
1) As said many times now, Javascript+CSS-Images = unusable
2) The imaged version doesn't work in Safari. In Safari, it shows up 
as the default (to me, this isn't acceptable). Also, if anyone isn't 
aware, Safari is the major browser for Mac computers.


So, to fix this, first you make it so it doesn't load if images 
aren't available. I'm working on this. Then, you  find an 
alternative, working method for Safari. I'm gonna attempt to fix this 
as well.


The images is the biggie, the Safari thing isn't so much usability, 
just that the look isn't consistent when it should be.


Likely, James A. wrote:

Agreed thanks,
 I don't know much about JavaScript, but is there really a way to 
make sure that you get all users?


 

*From:* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] *On Behalf Of *Dave Woods

*Sent:* Friday, January 25, 2008 2:33 PM
*To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
*Subject:* Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

What are the chances of that happening? I would think it would be very
slim wouldn't it?

You'd be surprised... I know a few dialup users who browse with 
images disabled to speed up loading times but leave CSS and 
JavaScript on so that the presentation and any enhanced 
functionality is still available.


I agree that these types of users are in the minority but they do 
exist.




On 25/01/2008, *Likely, James A.* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




From all of the examples that I have seen this is the one that
accommodates most users.

How would a screen reader read this option? Has any one tested
something
similar to the example that I found?

Thanks again for the help.

James

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]]
On Behalf Of Christian Snodgrass
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2008 1:03 PM
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org mailto:wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

That isn't bad, but if you have Javascript and CSS, but no 
images, it

fails completely.

Likely, James A. wrote:
 Thanks for the emails. Some things I didn't think of but will
from now

 on. I have been doing some reading and looking at options and 
found

 this example.

 http://www.chriserwin.com/scripts/crir/

 What are your thoughts on this approach?

 To me it looks pretty user friendly.

 Please let me know as this is new to me.

 Thanks

 James



 


 *From:* [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] *On Behalf Of *Dave Woods
 *Sent:* Wednesday, January 23, 2008 8:59 AM
 *To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org 
mailto:wsg@webstandardsgroup.org

 *Subject:* Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

 The first question I'd ask is why not just use check boxes
instead of
 trying to replicate them? If you mark them up correctly then 
there's
 really no better accessible method than using the correct 
element as

 it was meant.

 If you go down this route then you're likely to create all 
kinds of

 problems for yourself... what happens when users don't have css
 available (mobile devices), images disabled (dialup users) or are
 using screenreaders.

 If you want to change the appearance then I'd use JavaScript to
 enhance the existing check boxes but for those user agents that
don't
 support JavaScript or have it disabled you should have the 
fall back

 of regular forms.

 Hope that helps.

 - - - - -
 http://www.dave-woods.co.uk


 On 23/01/2008, *Likely, James A.*  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

 Hello,

 I am working on a new site for a client and need some
thoughts on
 a problem that I have.

 I am making a list with clickable boxes (like input boxes) 
that

 have

Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

2008-01-25 Thread Christian Snodgrass

That script has two flaws that reduce it's user base:
1) As said many times now, Javascript+CSS-Images = unusable
2) The imaged version doesn't work in Safari. In Safari, it shows up as 
the default (to me, this isn't acceptable). Also, if anyone isn't aware, 
Safari is the major browser for Mac computers.


So, to fix this, first you make it so it doesn't load if images aren't 
available. I'm working on this. Then, you  find an alternative, working 
method for Safari. I'm gonna attempt to fix this as well.


The images is the biggie, the Safari thing isn't so much usability, just 
that the look isn't consistent when it should be.


Likely, James A. wrote:

Agreed thanks,
 
I don't know much about JavaScript, but is there really a way to make 
sure that you get all users?



*From:* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] *On Behalf Of *Dave Woods

*Sent:* Friday, January 25, 2008 2:33 PM
*To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
*Subject:* Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

What are the chances of that happening? I would think it would be very
slim wouldn't it?

You'd be surprised... I know a few dialup users who browse with images 
disabled to speed up loading times but leave CSS and JavaScript on so 
that the presentation and any enhanced functionality is still available.


I agree that these types of users are in the minority but they do exist.



On 25/01/2008, *Likely, James A.* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




From all of the examples that I have seen this is the one that
accommodates most users.

How would a screen reader read this option? Has any one tested
something
similar to the example that I found?

Thanks again for the help.

James

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]]
On Behalf Of Christian Snodgrass
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2008 1:03 PM
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org mailto:wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

That isn't bad, but if you have Javascript and CSS, but no images, it
fails completely.

Likely, James A. wrote:
 Thanks for the emails. Some things I didn't think of but will
from now

 on. I have been doing some reading and looking at options and found
 this example.

 http://www.chriserwin.com/scripts/crir/

 What are your thoughts on this approach?

 To me it looks pretty user friendly.

 Please let me know as this is new to me.

 Thanks

 James



 *From:* [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] *On Behalf Of *Dave Woods
 *Sent:* Wednesday, January 23, 2008 8:59 AM
 *To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org mailto:wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
 *Subject:* Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

 The first question I'd ask is why not just use check boxes
instead of
 trying to replicate them? If you mark them up correctly then there's
 really no better accessible method than using the correct element as
 it was meant.

 If you go down this route then you're likely to create all kinds of
 problems for yourself... what happens when users don't have css
 available (mobile devices), images disabled (dialup users) or are
 using screenreaders.

 If you want to change the appearance then I'd use JavaScript to
 enhance the existing check boxes but for those user agents that
don't
 support JavaScript or have it disabled you should have the fall back
 of regular forms.

 Hope that helps.

 - - - - -
 http://www.dave-woods.co.uk


 On 23/01/2008, *Likely, James A.*  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

 Hello,

 I am working on a new site for a client and need some
thoughts on
 a problem that I have.

 I am making a list with clickable boxes (like input boxes) that
 have a checked, disabled and clickable state. My question
is, what
 would work best. Using background images or adding images to the
 code.

 The reason I ask is

 1) If I use images, we can add alt text to describe what
function
 the images have. This would help with screen readers and people
 with disabilities.

 2) Background images keep the code clean but wonder about
the alt
 text and how screen readers and people with disabilities would
 read the site. Is there a way to imitate the alt for background
 images?

 You can see an example of both ways

Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

2008-01-25 Thread Christian Snodgrass
In this particular case, the script will fail and fall back to the 
default look of the radio and check boxes if either Javascript or CSS is 
missing, which is good. The only problem in this case is if Javascript 
and CSS -are- available, but images are not. In that case, it becomes 
100% unusable.


Thomas Thomassen wrote:
Most mobile phones won't use Javascript or CSS either. And the usage 
of handheld devices is rapidly increasing. So is other gadgets. 
Nintendo DS for instance. We can't assume that only browser 
applications is used to access our webpages.


- Original Message - From: Christian Snodgrass 
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2008 8:31 PM
Subject: Re: [WSG] Background images versus image


I haven't tested on many screen readers, but from what I understand, 
most have CSS disabled, so it would read this as a regular form.


However, there is the possibility that someone uses a regular browser 
with screen reading technology (just like what you could use to read 
a document in Word). As for how likely this case my be, I have no 
idea. I'd say it'd have somewhere from 75-95% success rate for 
disabled users, but that is just an educated guess and is in no way a 
scientific or statistically evaluation.


You've actually gotten me interested in this idea so I'm currently 
working on my own version of that, with some fail safes to help 
eliminate this problem, as well as make it work on Safari (since, as 
you probably noticed, in his notes he said he disabled it in Safari). 
I'll let you know how it turns out.


Likely, James A. wrote:

What are the chances of that happening? I would think it would be very
slim wouldn't it?

From all of the examples that I have seen this is the one that
accommodates most users.
How would a screen reader read this option? Has any one tested 
something

similar to the example that I found?

Thanks again for the help.

James
-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
On Behalf Of Christian Snodgrass
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2008 1:03 PM
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

That isn't bad, but if you have Javascript and CSS, but no images, 
it fails completely.


Likely, James A. wrote:


Thanks for the emails. Some things I didn't think of but will from now




on. I have been doing some reading and looking at options and found 
this example.

 http://www.chriserwin.com/scripts/crir/
 What are your thoughts on this approach?
 To me it looks pretty user friendly.
 Please let me know as this is new to me.
 Thanks
 James



 



*From:* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] *On Behalf Of *Dave Woods

*Sent:* Wednesday, January 23, 2008 8:59 AM
*To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
*Subject:* Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

The first question I'd ask is why not just use check boxes instead 
of trying to replicate them? If you mark them up correctly then 
there's really no better accessible method than using the correct 
element as it was meant.


If you go down this route then you're likely to create all kinds of 
problems for yourself... what happens when users don't have css 
available (mobile devices), images disabled (dialup users) or are 
using screenreaders.


If you want to change the appearance then I'd use JavaScript to 
enhance the existing check boxes but for those user agents that 
don't support JavaScript or have it disabled you should have the 
fall back of regular forms.


Hope that helps.

- - - - -
http://www.dave-woods.co.uk


On 23/01/2008, *Likely, James A.*  [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Hello,

I am working on a new site for a client and need some thoughts on
a problem that I have.

I am making a list with clickable boxes (like input boxes) that
have a checked, disabled and clickable state. My question is, what
would work best. Using background images or adding images to the
code.

The reason I ask is

1) If I use images, we can add alt text to describe what function
the images have. This would help with screen readers and people
with disabilities.

2) Background images keep the code clean but wonder about the alt
text and how screen readers and people with disabilities would
read the site. Is there a way to imitate the alt for background
images?

You can see an example of both ways at:

Using images: _http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list.html_
Using background images:
_http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list2.html_

Let me know your thoughts and what you think would work best. I
love the background images as the code is clean, but has any one
done any testing to see how this would work for screen readers or
do you have suggestions on how to make it more accessible?

Thanks for the help.

James

Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

2008-01-25 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I haven't tested on many screen readers, but from what I understand, 
most have CSS disabled, so it would read this as a regular form.


However, there is the possibility that someone uses a regular browser 
with screen reading technology (just like what you could use to read a 
document in Word). As for how likely this case my be, I have no idea. 
I'd say it'd have somewhere from 75-95% success rate for disabled users, 
but that is just an educated guess and is in no way a scientific or 
statistically evaluation.


You've actually gotten me interested in this idea so I'm currently 
working on my own version of that, with some fail safes to help 
eliminate this problem, as well as make it work on Safari (since, as you 
probably noticed, in his notes he said he disabled it in Safari). I'll 
let you know how it turns out.


Likely, James A. wrote:

What are the chances of that happening? I would think it would be very
slim wouldn't it?

From all of the examples that I have seen this is the one that
accommodates most users. 


How would a screen reader read this option? Has any one tested something
similar to the example that I found?

Thanks again for the help.

James 


-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
On Behalf Of Christian Snodgrass
Sent: Friday, January 25, 2008 1:03 PM
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

That isn't bad, but if you have Javascript and CSS, but no images, it 
fails completely.


Likely, James A. wrote:
  

Thanks for the emails. Some things I didn't think of but will from now



  
on. I have been doing some reading and looking at options and found 
this example.
 
http://www.chriserwin.com/scripts/crir/
 
What are your thoughts on this approach?
 
To me it looks pretty user friendly.
 
Please let me know as this is new to me.
 
Thanks
 
James






  
*From:* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] *On Behalf Of *Dave Woods

*Sent:* Wednesday, January 23, 2008 8:59 AM
*To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
*Subject:* Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

The first question I'd ask is why not just use check boxes instead of 
trying to replicate them? If you mark them up correctly then there's 
really no better accessible method than using the correct element as 
it was meant.


If you go down this route then you're likely to create all kinds of 
problems for yourself... what happens when users don't have css 
available (mobile devices), images disabled (dialup users) or are 
using screenreaders.


If you want to change the appearance then I'd use JavaScript to 
enhance the existing check boxes but for those user agents that don't 
support JavaScript or have it disabled you should have the fall back 
of regular forms.


Hope that helps.

- - - - -
http://www.dave-woods.co.uk


On 23/01/2008, *Likely, James A.*  [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Hello,

I am working on a new site for a client and need some thoughts on
a problem that I have.

I am making a list with clickable boxes (like input boxes) that
have a checked, disabled and clickable state. My question is, what
would work best. Using background images or adding images to the
code.

The reason I ask is

1) If I use images, we can add alt text to describe what function
the images have. This would help with screen readers and people
with disabilities.

2) Background images keep the code clean but wonder about the alt
text and how screen readers and people with disabilities would
read the site. Is there a way to imitate the alt for background
images?

You can see an example of both ways at:

Using images: _http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list.html_
Using background images:
_http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list2.html_

Let me know your thoughts and what you think would work best. I
love the background images as the code is clean, but has any one
done any testing to see how this would work for screen readers or
do you have suggestions on how to make it more accessible?

Thanks for the help.

James





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Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

2008-01-25 Thread Christian Snodgrass
That isn't bad, but if you have Javascript and CSS, but no images, it 
fails completely.


Likely, James A. wrote:
Thanks for the emails. Some things I didn't think of but will from now 
on. I have been doing some reading and looking at options and found 
this example.
 
http://www.chriserwin.com/scripts/crir/
 
What are your thoughts on this approach?
 
To me it looks pretty user friendly.
 
Please let me know as this is new to me.
 
Thanks
 
James



*From:* [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] *On Behalf Of *Dave Woods

*Sent:* Wednesday, January 23, 2008 8:59 AM
*To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
*Subject:* Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

The first question I'd ask is why not just use check boxes instead of 
trying to replicate them? If you mark them up correctly then there's 
really no better accessible method than using the correct element as 
it was meant.


If you go down this route then you're likely to create all kinds of 
problems for yourself... what happens when users don't have css 
available (mobile devices), images disabled (dialup users) or are 
using screenreaders.


If you want to change the appearance then I'd use JavaScript to 
enhance the existing check boxes but for those user agents that don't 
support JavaScript or have it disabled you should have the fall back 
of regular forms.


Hope that helps.

- - - - -
http://www.dave-woods.co.uk


On 23/01/2008, *Likely, James A.*  [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Hello,

I am working on a new site for a client and need some thoughts on
a problem that I have.

I am making a list with clickable boxes (like input boxes) that
have a checked, disabled and clickable state. My question is, what
would work best. Using background images or adding images to the
code.

The reason I ask is

1) If I use images, we can add alt text to describe what function
the images have. This would help with screen readers and people
with disabilities.

2) Background images keep the code clean but wonder about the alt
text and how screen readers and people with disabilities would
read the site. Is there a way to imitate the alt for background
images?

You can see an example of both ways at:

Using images: _http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list.html_
Using background images:
_http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list2.html_

Let me know your thoughts and what you think would work best. I
love the background images as the code is clean, but has any one
done any testing to see how this would work for screen readers or
do you have suggestions on how to make it more accessible?

Thanks for the help.

James


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Phone: 859.816.7955



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[WSG] A Question of Semantics

2008-01-24 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Hello,

I have a small semantic problem that I can't make up my mind about. 
Basically, I have a list like this: Something: blah blah; blah; blah. 
The Something: is a different font size, and kind of a header for the 
list. I can't decide if I should just do a paragraph with Something 
strong or in a span, or if I should do a header and then the text in a 
paragraph, with some CSS to make it look properly, or if I should make 
it some kind of definition or other list.


What do you think?

Thanks.
--

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Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/ http://www.arwebdesign.net
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] A Question of Semantics

2008-01-24 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Mordechai Peller wrote:

Christian Snodgrass wrote:
I have a small semantic problem that I can't make up my mind about. 
Basically, I have a list like this: Something: blah blah; blah; 
blah. The Something: is a different font size, and kind of a 
header for the list. I can't decide if I should just do a paragraph 
with Something strong or in a span, or if I should do a header and 
then the text in a paragraph, with some CSS to make it look properly, 
or if I should make it some kind of definition or other list.
It sounds like a good candidate for a definition list, but without 
more details, I can't say for sure. Basically, the DD's should 
describe their DT's. That said, you can take the meaning of describe 
very loosely. A classic example from the specs is dialog.



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Specially, there are 4 sections: System Requirements, Issue, Cause, and 
Resolution (this is for a computer-related knowledge base). System 
Requirements is a semi-colon seperated list of system requirements (such 
as Operating System: Windows XP; Computer Brand: Dell), Issue, Cause, 
and Resolution are a block of text (sometimes multiple paragraphs) that 
describe and the problem and solution.


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Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/ http://www.arwebdesign.net
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Re: [WSG] Background images versus image

2008-01-23 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Basically, here is the simplest way to answer this question. Is there 
meaningful and important alt text you can give the image, or is their 
something they'd miss out on without the image or alt text?. If the 
answer is yes, use images. If not, then use background images. 
Basically, background images are supposed to be purely -decoration-. If 
they are in any way, shape, or form content, use images.


Although, in your specific case, I would go with what Dave Woods said. 
If you really want those image check boxes, use normal check boxes, and 
then use Javascript to swap those out for your image ones. With that 
solution, if they don't have Javascript, normal check boxes appear 
(which are easy for screen readers and the like), and if you do have 
Javascript, you get your cute image check boxes. And, I'd say use normal 
images for those as well and use alt text like checked, unchecked, 
disabled, however, that wouldn't work well with a screen reader.


Likely, James A. wrote:


Hello,

I am working on a new site for a client and need some thoughts on a 
problem that I have.


I am making a list with clickable boxes (like input boxes) that have a 
checked, disabled and clickable state. My question is, what would work 
best. Using background images or adding images to the code.


The reason I ask is

1) If I use images, we can add alt text to describe what function the 
images have. This would help with screen readers and people with 
disabilities.


2) Background images keep the code clean but wonder about the alt text 
and how screen readers and people with disabilities would read the 
site. Is there a way to imitate the alt for background images?


You can see an example of both ways at:

Using images: _http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list.html_
Using background images: _http://wisconsin.joekiosk.com/list/list2.html_

Let me know your thoughts and what you think would work best. I love 
the background images as the code is clean, but has any one done any 
testing to see how this would work for screen readers or do you have 
suggestions on how to make it more accessible?


Thanks for the help.

James


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Re: [WSG] Where did I come from?

2008-01-18 Thread Christian Snodgrass
When I read that, I thought about creating a button that finds the site 
you were at before you came in here, and then keeps that the same 
throughout the site, so no matter how many pages you go to, you can get 
back out of all of those and back where you were before you started 
that. That's a bit different functionality then a standard back button 
on an internet browser.


And I got that idea from the other thread that the thread starter made 
about an internal application that refuses to let you leave the site.


Patrick H. Lauke wrote:

Christian Snodgrass wrote:
You shouldn't always assume that they are just trying to replace the 
back button.


They could want to get the referrer for something else.


From the thread starter
.I just want to know what the previous page was...so I can create a 
button to go back to it..


P



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Re: [WSG] Where did I come from?

2008-01-18 Thread Christian Snodgrass
You shouldn't always assume that they are just trying to replace the 
back button.


They could want to get the referrer for something else.

And, not everyone knows about the back button. Don't assume...

Joseph Ortenzi wrote:

But why?
everyone knows about the back button, don't they? So you don't really 
need to help them. And if the previous site was yours and you want to 
see if they went from your site A to your site B then you could 
probably do this with sessions or by passing a variable forward 
through the link using a server-side language like ASP or PHP.


If all you want to do is allow them to go back to where they were 
before they came to you, tell them about the back button in their 
browser.


One option is to set up Google Analytics on the site, so you can see 
the referrers without any messy coding, otherwise, it's really none of 
your business is it?


You could create a function on all of your pages that, if they have 
never been there before and don't have your cookie, to ask them where 
they came from and show them their back button, but really, it isn't 
any of your business.


So I suppose the web Standards part of this question is about polite 
behaviour?


Joe


On Jan 18, 2008, at 14:24, Simon Cockayne wrote:


Hi,

I am on a webpage...how do I know what page the browser was 
previously showing.


I think Javascript History object is the ticket...but STRICT mode in 
Firefox seems to tell me that I don't have permission to access it.


NOTE: I don't want to use the History object to go back or 
forward...I just want to know what the previous page was...so I can 
create a button to go back to it...


Cheers,

Simon



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==
Joe Ortenzi
[EMAIL PROTECTED]




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[WSG] Definition List appropriate for FAQ?

2008-01-17 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Hello,

I've been trying to decide which is more semantically correct for an 
FAQ, either 2 paragraph (one for the question, one for the answer), a 
single paragraph (with spans for formating), or a definition list. I 
think the definition list is probably the most appropriate, but at the 
same time you can't really call an FAQ a list of definitions, so I'm not 
really sure. What are your thoughts on this?


Thanks.
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Azure Ronin Web Design
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Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] Definition List appropriate for FAQ?

2008-01-17 Thread Christian Snodgrass
Thanks everyone for the replies. I think I will go with a definition 
list, which is what I was leaning towards in the first place.


Thierry Koblentz wrote:

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
On Behalf Of Christian Snodgrass
Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2008 7:02 AM
To: wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
Subject: [WSG] Definition List appropriate for FAQ?

Hello,

I've been trying to decide which is more semantically correct for an
FAQ, either 2 paragraph (one for the question, one for the answer), a
single paragraph (with spans for formating), or a definition list. I
think the definition list is probably the most appropriate, but at the
same time you can't really call an FAQ a list of definitions, so I'm
not



http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/lists.html#h-10.3
Definition lists vary only slightly from other types of lists in that list
items consist of two parts: a term and a description.
Note that in the above paragraph they use the term description rather than
definition. 


You may also want to read the thread semantic list with explanation from
last week. As it discusses an issue specific to DLs

And this in case you plan to make the Qs toggle (on/off) the As:
plughttp://tjkdesign.com/articles/toggle_elements.asp/plug

  



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Re: [WSG] When can I start using E4X

2008-01-15 Thread Christian Snodgrass
In short, if it isn't available in IE7, then not for at least a year at 
the very least, but more likely about 3+ years.


I wouldn't try to right any critical applications with it any time soon.

Keryx Web wrote:

He all!

I have been searching the net for rumors and facts about E4X 
implementations. This is what I've found:


Mozilla (Spidermonkey and Rhino) support E4X today - and has been 
doing it for a while!


Adobe does too.

So does (already/soon?) MbedThis. At least they are 100% committed.

Webkit:
The E4X standard adds some XML-related features to the
 JavaScript language. We should consider adding these to the
JavaScriptCore engine.

http://webkit.org/projects/javascript/index.html

My interpretation: Positive attitude, but no commitment.

Opera:

I can not find an official quote, but rumours on the web says they are 
committed, as in Only Mozilla and Opera have committed just to E4x

http://theopensourcery.com/cssbasics6b.htm
I know Opera have E4X in the works at some level
http://www.codingforums.com/showpost.php?s=a9dfc400dfd427203a99487bd4ea29d9p=448007postcount=10 



KHTML:

No info available, AFAIK. If it goes into webkit, I presume a backport 
would be feasible. (Or perhaps the rumors about merging with Webkit 
are true...)


iCab seems to be on board as well:
http://www.snailshell.de/blog/archives/10-01-2005_10-31-2005.html

Which in summary says that only MS are clearly unwilling to implement 
this feature. We may get it through ScreamingMonkey, though.


My questions:

1. Are there any clear indications from the developers of these 
browser engines (or their internal ECMAScript engines) that I've missed?


2. Will E4X on MSIE in fact be facilitated through ScreamingMonkey?

3. When do you predict that we can really start using E4X and expect 
it to work for most visitors to our websites?



Lars Gunther



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Re: [WSG] Rockwell?

2007-12-21 Thread Christian Snodgrass

You really have 4 options:
1) Select a different, more available font.
2) Use that font, and then have it go to a more standard one if that one 
isn't available. (like font-family: rockwell, arial, serif)

3) Make an image with the header
4) Embed the font. WARNING: This is almost certainly copyright infringement.

I really recommend selecting a different, more standard font. If that 
isn't an option, I would just go with option 2. Use Rockwell, but have a 
more standard font list after Rockwell. If I remember correctly, I think 
Rockwell is similar to Impact, which is more standard.


You could make an image out of it, but that is kind of a waste and then 
it wouldn't be selectable as text, which is a hassle. If you do this, 
make sure you have an alt tag that says the same text.


Jos Flachs wrote:

Hi,

I got a font problem: for a site I'm working on I'd like to use
rockwell.ttf, in the h1 tag.

Rockwell isn't a standard font, but every windows user has them, and
it is also available for Mac. But I don't know if this font is in the
Mac fontbook. And I'm pretty sure *nix users don't have it at all.

Is it a better solution to use a gif instead? (Most of the visitors
are Windows users.)

Thanks for any advice,

 Jos Flachs mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Bangkok, Thailand



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Re: [WSG] Do we just throw out the img tag

2007-12-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Michael Horowitz wrote:
Now that I have mastered putting an image in a site using CSS do we 
just throw out the img tag in standards based xhtml.  And how does the 
use of css compare with use of the object tag 
http://www.webstandards.org/learn/articles/askw3c/jun2004/ I found in 
my google searches on the issue.



No, we shouldn't get rid of the img element. There is a semantic 
difference between using CSS to put in an image (which is a background) 
and a normal image, which could be content.


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Re: [WSG] Opera files antitrust against MS: standards one part

2007-12-13 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I think Opera considers this to be a slightly different case then that 
of email clients, cd burning software, etc. The key point in here I 
think is that Internet Explorer has low standards-compliance, which 
hinders the development of internet-based projects. I don't think it's 
so much they it only comes with Internet Explorer, as it is that it only 
comes with Internet Explorer -which isn't standards compliant-.


I think if IE was standards-compliant, we wouldn't be seeing this.

Just my 2 cents.

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Re: [WSG] skip links

2007-12-13 Thread Christian Snodgrass
You don't skip links, it means you probably don't have a skip link. I've 
never used IBM's program, but that is what I would assume it is 
referring to. A skip link is an accessibility feature used to skip over 
repetitive information like navigation. Here is a good article on them: 
http://www.jimthatcher.com/skipnav.htm


dwain wrote:
i'm using ibm's adesigner.  i'm getting errors about skip links.  how 
do you skip links?  why?

dwain

--
dwain alford
The artist may use any form which his expression demands;
for his inner impulse must find suitable expression.  Kandinsky
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Re: [WSG] Article: Vocalize Firefox (text-to-speech extensions for Firefox)

2007-12-05 Thread Christian Snodgrass


I haven't tried them before but they sound very interesting. I'll have 
to give them a look.


Nick Lo wrote:
I'm wondering if anyone has tried/tested the following potentially 
useful extensions and if so what their opinion was/is:


Two recently released text-to-speech extensions can transform Firefox 
into a talking Web browser suitable for users with visual impairments 
-- and anyone else who can use a speech interface to the Web. Fire Vox 
is designed to be a full-fledged screen reader in a browser, usable 
for daily browsing even for unsighted users. CLiCk, Speak provides 
point-and-click screen reading, which can be helpful for 
partially-sighted users or sighted users who have written language 
difficulties (such as dyslexia).


http://www.linux.com/feature/122197

Nick


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Re: [WSG] Article: Vocalize Firefox (text-to-speech extensions for Firefox)

2007-12-04 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I haven't tried them before but they sound very interesting. I'll have 
to give them a look.


Nick Lo wrote:
I'm wondering if anyone has tried/tested the following potentially 
useful extensions and if so what their opinion was/is:


Two recently released text-to-speech extensions can transform Firefox 
into a talking Web browser suitable for users with visual impairments 
-- and anyone else who can use a speech interface to the Web. Fire Vox 
is designed to be a full-fledged screen reader in a browser, usable 
for daily browsing even for unsighted users. CLiCk, Speak provides 
point-and-click screen reading, which can be helpful for 
partially-sighted users or sighted users who have written language 
difficulties (such as dyslexia).


http://www.linux.com/feature/122197

Nick


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Re: [WSG] nested fieldset/legend/list/label/input css woes in IE6/7

2007-12-03 Thread Christian Snodgrass
What happens if you use add the for attribute for the label? Does that 
help correct any of the problem? Other than that I don't see anything 
that should be causing too much of a problem.


Lord Armitage wrote:

Hi to the List,

I'm working on an advanced form Layout for a complicated questionnaire
application.
I've setteled on a nested fieldset/legend/list/label/input markup wich
is semantically correct imho. And now i'm running (expectedly) into
some Problems in IE6/7. I've uploaded a testcase for the markup along
with a description and some browser test results. Any help greatly
appreciated.

Testcase URL: http://snusnu.info/~armitage/questions_testcase.html

  



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Re: [WSG] Markup question

2007-11-28 Thread Christian Snodgrass

We actually had this issue about 2 months ago.

There is a deprecated attribute for order list called start. You can use 
that, but it won't be valid HTML Strict (though it is Transitional).


You can also use the CSS counter element, which should work in your case.

The name of the old topic is Catch 22 list problem, which you can find 
in the WSG archives if you want to read the full discussion.


John Faulds wrote:
I have to mark up a club constitution where all the paragraphs are 
numbered but there are also headings that are supposed to relate to 
paragraphs, e.g.:


Heading 1

1. Paragraph goes here

2. Paragraph goes here

3. Paragraph goes here

Heading 2

4. Paragraph goes here

5. Paragraph goes here

Heading 3

6. Paragraph goes here

etc.

An ordered list seems like the most obvious choice but what would I do 
with the headings which fall outside of the list items?





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[WSG] Web Standards Presentation

2007-11-27 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Hello,

I am going to be giving a presentation on Web Standards to all relevant 
professors at my university to help them catch up and get up-to-date in 
what they are teaching the students. I am putting together various 
resources for them, including a website (which can be found at 
http://www.arwebdesign.net/webstandards), a slideshow presentation (or 
possibly several), and any other resources they might find useful. This 
will be on ongoing project, with plans for me to do a new presentation 
at least once a semester and for me to continually update the website 
with new information, resources, and to send out a newsletter to them 
answering any questions they have and what not. While this is being 
designed specifically for my university, it is open to anyone who finds 
the information helpful.


Since this is the Web Standards group, I'd like to ask if some members 
would be willing to look over the information I have gathered and I am 
developing and would comment, critique, correct, etc. on everything I 
have presented. The website is in it's very early stages as I am still 
working on the actual content of the site before I worry about the 
website itself. I have uploaded the current plans for navigation and a 
skeletal outline of the information I plan on presenting to 
http://www.arwebdesign.net/webstandards/files/outline.pdf (also 
available in .odt). If you could look over the topics I plan to cover 
and give any recommendations of any topics or sub-topics you think I 
missed, I'd be very grateful. This presentation is only an hour long, 
but all of the information will be available online, so even topics I 
don't get to cover they can view online. I will be updating the outline 
continually throughout the next several days, as well as the website, so 
check them out regularly if you are able to.


Once again, thanks for your help,
Christian Snodgrass
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Re: [WSG] Web Standards Presentation

2007-11-27 Thread Christian Snodgrass

Lol, yes, I know.

I forgot to mention that, thanks to there not being enough time on this 
planet, this website is doubling as a final project in two of my 
classes. That menu, as well as the links for games and animations are 
part of that. Once that is over with, they'll likely be removed. At the 
moment there isn't much accessibility built-in, but I plan on making it 
as accessible as possible once I'm ready to finalize that menu. I'm also 
going to make sure and have an alternate, non-Flash, static menu for 
those that can't use Flash, which I do regardless.


But, I agree that using a Flash menu on the site doesn't really fit, but 
at the same time, I'd like to discuss using accessible Flash, which 
doesn't seem to be mentioned very often in standards texts. In fact, I 
didn't even realize this, but Flash has some support for screen-readers 
and various things, along with the fact that you can take out the 
screen-reader and make it fully accessible in it's own regards.


David Storey wrote:
Opera may be working on educational material of our own, through our 
Developer relations and Dev.opera.com work.  I'll take a look, but as 
a quick first suggestion, it may not be the best idea to use a flash 
menu in a standards site.  I'm not sure if you've put much 
accessibility work into it, but it is a core part of the site and wont 
work on a number of devices where Adobe don't make flash available or 
there are not enough resources for it to run.


David

On 27 Nov 2007, at 19:18, Christian Snodgrass wrote:


Hello,

I am going to be giving a presentation on Web Standards to all 
relevant professors at my university to help them catch up and get 
up-to-date in what they are teaching the students. I am putting 
together various resources for them, including a website (which can 
be found at http://www.arwebdesign.net/webstandards), a slideshow 
presentation (or possibly several), and any other resources they 
might find useful. This will be on ongoing project, with plans for me 
to do a new presentation at least once a semester and for me to 
continually update the website with new information, resources, and 
to send out a newsletter to them answering any questions they have 
and what not. While this is being designed specifically for my 
university, it is open to anyone who finds the information helpful.


Since this is the Web Standards group, I'd like to ask if some 
members would be willing to look over the information I have gathered 
and I am developing and would comment, critique, correct, etc. on 
everything I have presented. The website is in it's very early stages 
as I am still working on the actual content of the site before I 
worry about the website itself. I have uploaded the current plans for 
navigation and a skeletal outline of the information I plan on 
presenting to 
http://www.arwebdesign.net/webstandards/files/outline.pdf (also 
available in .odt). If you could look over the topics I plan to cover 
and give any recommendations of any topics or sub-topics you think I 
missed, I'd be very grateful. This presentation is only an hour long, 
but all of the information will be available online, so even topics I 
don't get to cover they can view online. I will be updating the 
outline continually throughout the next several days, as well as the 
website, so check them out regularly if you are able to.


Once again, thanks for your help,
Christian Snodgrass
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Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/ http://www.arwebdesign.net
Phone: 859.816.7955



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David Storey
Chief Web Opener
Opera Software
Oslo, Norway

W: http://my.opera.com/dstorey
✉ : [EMAIL PROTECTED]
✆ : +47 24 16 42 26





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Re: [WSG] Web Standards Presentation

2007-11-27 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I will also be talking Semantics. If you took a look at my outline, the 
HTML, Div vs. Tables, Deprecated Elements and Attributes, and WYSIWYG 
editor sections will be largely semantic discussion.


Susan Grossman wrote:

Since this is the Web Standards group, I'd like to ask if some members
would be willing to look over the information I have gathered and I am
developing and would comment, critique, correct, etc. on everything I
have presented.




Nice Start - though if I was talking Standards I'd also talk about Semantics


  

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Re: [WSG] SIte Maps?

2007-11-19 Thread Christian Snodgrass
As far as should obscure site link A be included?, the answer is yes. 
Sitemaps should generally have a link to each and every link on your 
website. I typically use just a standard unordered list (ul), and nest 
it if appropriate.


Designer wrote:
I have never done a site map/index. I have Googled, but the results 
seem complicated, at least for a newcomer to site maps. I want to 
provide a way for visitor to a site to get where they want easily. Of 
course, the basic structure of the site is key, but when, e.g., there 
is a link to an obscure (but relevant) aspect of the content, it would 
be nice if he/she could find it.


Any links or pointers to creating such an index/map would be most 
welcome. Needless to say, standards and accessibility are important  . 
. .


Thanks,

Bob

www.gwelanmor-internet.co.uk



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Re: [WSG] Navigation - Pseudo Standards?

2007-11-14 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I think it really comes down to which you want to be more important, 
site navigation or the products. If you only have like 2 pages besides 
product navigation and your site is basically an online store, I would 
put the products on the left. If you are a site with content that just 
happens to sell something, I would put them on the left.


I think it's pretty well accepted that people look at the left side of 
the screen before the right (generally), so whichever you want them to 
see first is what should go on the left.


Christie Mason wrote:

We're having an internal discussion about the placement of site navigation
(Contact Us, etc) vs Product Navigation (Search, Category 1, Category 2,
etc) in a 3 column layout with

| Navigation |Content | Navigation |

Some feel the site navigation should be in the left column with products in
the right column, others feel the opposite.

Does anyone know of any studies or review of user preferences indicating
which is the majority preference for web users?

Christie Mason



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Re: [WSG] cant stop IE 7 unnecessary vertical scrolling

2007-11-05 Thread Christian Snodgrass

In my browser (FF, with 1280x1024 resolution) I still have to scroll down.

The problem is your #subcontent with height: 89%. There are a couple of 
problems with using % values for height. The first is that it is quite 
unreliable in general. The second is it's relative to the height of the 
users browser, so when you start mixing absolute and relative heights 
together, unexpected things start happening.


My recommendation is to figure out at what height you want it to be 
total, since it's unlikely you can get it perfect for every resolution, 
and set an absolute value for the height. If you don't want to do that, 
then you may want to try playing with setting the footer to have an 
absolute position to get it to sit at the very bottom of the browser 
(using bottom: 0).


Samantha Resnick wrote:

Hello-
I been working on this site for work, right now its still in the works 
of course. I so far [as far as i can tell] got it to work seamlessly 
in FF and for the most part, IE 7, my issue is with the height in IE 
7, I finally got my divs to stop vertically scrolling [it was adding 
in unnecessary height to my divs]  in IE 7 but while it was doing that 
my footer was perfectly sitting on the bottom of the browser, now that 
I have gotten my divs to be normal height, as they are in FF, there is 
still vertical scrolling that shouldnt be there, I checked my css over 
and over again, and of course i notice nothing. I have been to many 
forums searching for an answer but everything I find and try doesnt 
seem to work for my problem. I have to css files one for FF and one 
for IE 7. If anyone can help me out here it will be greatly appreciated.


Just a little info, I have tried: height, _height, /height, 
min-height. I even changed my percentages to half of what they are to 
see if there would be a change and nothing changed on my end.  Thank 
you all in advance for helping me out.


-Samantha

XHTML: http://samantharesnick.com/xhtmltravel/index_ieff.htm
FF CSS: http://samantharesnick.com/xhtmltravel/styles/styles_footer2.css
IE 7  CSS: http://samantharesnick.com/xhtmltravel/styles/styles_iefix.css
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Re: [WSG] s2m Digital- Mid Weight Designer required!

2007-11-01 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I agree. Pixel perfection is almost always only achievable through the 
use of absolute positioning, absolute font-sizes, and the like. Those 
type of things go against many standards and common-best-practices of 
web design, which needs to inherently be flexible to match the broad 
number of browsers, resolutions, available fonts, and the like.


Ian Chamberlain wrote:

Jeremy, is your client really looking for pixel perfection
I note you are also looking for a person who is passionate and has a 
thorough understanding of web design; such a person may have 
difficulty with pixel perfection.

- Original Message -

*From:* Jeremy Champion mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
*To:* wsg@webstandardsgroup.org mailto:wsg@webstandardsgroup.org
*Sent:* Thursday, November 01, 2007 7:26 AM
*Subject:* [WSG] s2m Digital- Mid Weight Designer required!

Company: s2m Digital
Job Title: Mid weight Web Designer (3-5 years experience)- leading
Publisher!
Description: My client is a large magazine publisher with a
diverse group of leading titles.

The designer will be responsible for creating dynamic, visually
compelling and functional website interface as well as advertising
designs across their portfolio. They must have the ability to
create “pixel perfect” front-end designs from initial concept to
finished Photoshop (or similar) screens.

Responsibilities:

• Designing usable, accessible interfaces, websites and user
experiences for the clients' sites
• Working with sales and editorial teams to develop design
solutions that deliver business and corporate objectives and
fulfill user needs
• Assisting with day-to-day promotional materials for website
maintenance
• Working with technical colleagues to ensure appropriate delivery
of design solutions; maximizing accessibility and usability of
products and services

Essential criteria:

• A thorough understanding of web design, its forms, functions and
unique constraints is essential
• Must have a genuine passion for web design
• A working knowledge of the principles of user interaction design
and information architecture will be highly regarded as well as
experience designing for CSS / .NET
• First-rate skills in Photoshop, Image Ready and Illustrator.
Familiarity with In Design is an advantage.
• Must have a strong portfolio of consumer websites – able to
interpret existing magazines online. Understanding of the breadth
of brands represented under the masthead, and the design aesthetic
necessary for each brand.
• Experience designing for mobile, understanding of Flash + action
scripting or digital video editing and streaming video for the web
will be highly regarded but not essential

Cheers

Jeremy Champion

Talent Broker

s2m Digital

s2m Executive

s2m Sales and Marketing

www.s2m.com.au blocked::http://www.s2m.com.au/

Level 7, 280 George Street

Sydney NSW 2000

Ph: +61 2 9228 9000

Fax: +61 2 9228 9090

Mobile: 0433 249 725

IF CANDIDATE OVERVIEWS OR RESUMES ARE ATTACHED PLEASE NOTE THAT:

By using any information in this document you agree to be bound by
the standard terms and conditions of s2m Executive Pty. Ltd. You
agree not to employ or arrange employment of candidates supplied
in this document without first entering into a contractual
agreement with s2m Executive Pty. Ltd. You further agree not to
divulge any information contained in this document to any persons
or entities without the express written permission of s2m
Executive Pty. Ltd.


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Re: [WSG] javascript help

2007-10-31 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I don't like giving out answers to homework questions, but here are some 
hints:
1) Which attribute is used for setting the background (in HTML)? Which 
property is used to set a background color with CSS (which is what style 
uses)?

2) Only one of those is correct. Check online for the  proper syntax.
3) The short operators have the operator then the = sign. Also, ! is a 
conditional operator for not.
4) There is only one of those I would consider using... I don't like 
having to click to see my page.
5) Only one of those is correct. I bet you can figure out which one is 
needed to make a new array.
6) There is only one. onClick and onMouseOut don't sound like something 
a keyboard could do. Use google to figure out what the other two do.
7) Objects always have capital letters, so you should use them when you 
make a new one.
8) I think the second line needs to be z = 
document.getElementById(y).style.display;. === is a comparison operator 
to compare something. The line that starts with a is an alternate form 
of an if statement with the syntax of contition : iftrue ? iffalse

9) Don't have a hint for this one. I recommend google again.
10) It'd be annoying for Javascript to work when it was turned off. .

Hope that helped, without giving it away. ;)

Also, Google is your friend. =)

Alexander Uribe wrote:
 
 
Hi there,
 
I have some questions for an assignment that I can't figure out. If 
anyone could be of assistance that would be much appreciated.
 
1)Which instruction will change the background colour of an element?

A   document.getElementById(t).backgroundColor = yellow
*B*  document.getElementById(t).bgcolor = yellow
*C*  document.getElementById(t).style.backgroundColor = yellow
*D*  document.getElementById(t).style.color = yellow
 
2)

Which are the valid 'for' statement(s)
*A*  for x = 1 to 10
*B*  for(x=0; x10; x++)
*C*  for(x=0, y=10; x10; x++, y--)
*D*  for(x=0, x10, x++)
 
3)

Which are the INCORRECT math equations
*A*  a =+ 20;
*B*  a = a + 20;
*C*  a = 20 / 4;
*D*  a++;
*E*  a != 30;
*F*  a =* 4;
*G*  a = 3;
 
4)

Which are the preferred methods to use when Javascript has been disabled ?
*A*  noscript/noscript
*B*  a href=# onCick=myFunction();Show Page/a
*C*  a href=page1.htmShow Page/a
*D*  a href=page1.htm onCick=myFunction();Show Page/a
 
5)

An array can be initialised by
*A*  var a = new Array(ab,b,c);
*B*  var a = [a,b,c];
*C*  var a = (a,b,c);
*D*  var a = a[a,b,c];
 
6)

When you tab into a form control (i.e. a textbox) what event is executed
*A*  onMouseOut
*B*  onClick
*C*  onBlur
*D*  onFocus
 
7)

What syntax is needed to initalise a Regular Expression
*A*  var re = RegExp();
*B*  var re = new RegExp();
*C*  var re = regexp;
*D*  var re = new regexp();
 
8)

What does the following function do
function x(y){
document.getElementById(y).style.display;
a = (z=='block') ? 'none' : 'block';
z.a;
}
*A*  hide or shows a div tag
*B*  hide or shows an element
*C*  hide or shows a paragraph
*D*  hide or show a table
 
9)
Which cross browser (but not W3C DOM compliant instructions) can be 
used to find the Height and Width of an object on a web page *A*  
clientWidth, clientHeight

*B*  scrollWidth, scrollHeight
*C*  scrollTop, scrollLeft
*D*  offsetWidth, offsetHeight
 
10)

If Javascript has been disabled by the user then
*A*  inline scripting will still work
*B*  only mouse events will still work
*C*  AJAX will still be useable
*D*  no scripts will be executed
 
 
Cheers.



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Christian Snodgrass
Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] Rounded Courners .... Your Take

2007-10-30 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I also prefer using the div tags. I think it's as semantically valid 
as span, which neither of them really are.


The idea for a PHP round corners script is a very interesting one as 
well. I'd be interested in seeing that script.


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Christian Snodgrass
Azure Ronin Web Design
http://www.arwebdesign.net/
Phone: 859.816.7955



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Re: [WSG] Web Standards In Colleges and Universities

2007-10-22 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I am actually having a similar problem. I was able to skip the Web 
Development class, so I didn't have to sit through it, but I am sure it 
is similar to how yours is. We have a Javascript class and the HTML that 
is taught in there is hideous. Also, my teacher in my Multimedia class 
is wanting us to create a Flash-only website, which I've told him is not 
right.


I'm actually planning on talking to them one-on-one to help them get up 
to today's standards. Also, I work for a group who's primary duty is to 
maintain the residential network, but also does things such as 
computer-related websites. I'm planning on putting together one for 
today's website standards as well as for accessibility and invite pretty 
much every computer and technology related teacher to it so I can help 
try and open some eyes.


I think it is such a shame when the schools turn out sub-par web 
developers, who later become more roadblocks to acceptable standards usage.


But, like others have already said, don't be confrontational, be 
informative. I am in my 5th semester so I know many of the teachers in 
quite well already, so I can talk to them without them getting 
defensive. You have to be helpful or else they'll just plug their ears 
and refuse to listen.


Good luck with your school,
Christian Snodgrass

James Jeffery wrote:

Good Morning!

Here is my problem. Im at college this year, preparing for University 
(Hopefully Birmingham) to
study Software Engineering. At college we have a class on a Thursday 
called Web Development
and the guy thats teaching the class in an absolute joke, no 
seriously, he is.


He is teaching students how to create web pages using Dreamweaver in 
Design view, and then

telling students if they can do this, they are Web Designers.

I was angry, i instantly replied and questioned his knowledge on HTML 
and asked the age old question:
What are tables in HTML used for?, he replied To lay out web pages 
and for tabled data, i replied with

wrong, he laughed and told me he knows what he is talking about.

I seriously want to raise a huge issue at the college, but im not sure 
how to do it. This guy is on 22k+
a year, and cannot even teach people correctly, he may have been a pro 
back in the days when tables

were acceptable to lay out web pages, but  in todays world he is a fool.

Its half term now, we have an assignment to complete using 
Dreamweaver, and he said i have to use
tables, its not a problem, i will do as the assignment requests. I 
will walk the extra mile and create the
same page without tables, with semantics, with accessibility in mind 
and without the bloated mark-up,

and then write a essay comparing the both.

What power do i have (if any) to try and get the college to understand 
they cannot use a cowboy to
teach tomorrows computer experts. Should i use my essay and examples 
and take it to the head of
the college? I really don't know how to go about this, but its 
definatly a problem.


I really am angry and annoyed, you pay money to be taught the correct 
methods. People who don't
understand are fine, they will believe him, and thats the shocking 
part about it all.


I await some advice.

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Re: [WSG] intranet benchmarking quiz

2007-10-17 Thread Christian Snodgrass

plasmo wrote:

Hi,

I am currently reviewing an area of an intranet, and getting a lot of
anecdotal comments such as all the intranets I've ever seen worked
like this.

To deal with this somewhat, I am taking a short quiz of people's
experiences with their current intranets.

If anyone here can help, replies would be most appreciated.

Kind regards,
Vanessa Toholka

QUESTIONS:
1.  Does your company have a single overarching intranet, which is the
first point that everyone goes to, with sub sections for various
groups OR do you have a separate site for each section or group within
the company?

2.  Is your intranet built on a standard set of templates reflected
across divisions, or are your sub sites or various intranets very
different?

3.  If a new service/resource was being launched in your organisation
would the announcement be made via email or via the intranet?

4.  Do you utilise any collaboration tools. (discussion boards, wikis,
blogs etc?)  If so do they enjoy a good level of user activity and
participation?


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1) Overarching intranet. I am currently redoing ours from scratch and 
it'll be the central point for anything else web-based for our company.
2) At the moment they are different, but we'll probably have some common 
elements (most likely the header and horizontal menu).

3) Via intranet. We rarely email each other.
4) We currently use a forum (discussion board) and we get everyone 
participating, though it took a bit of coaxing to get them started using it.



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Re: [WSG] introducing a prompt to download or open a pdf

2007-10-16 Thread Christian Snodgrass
I haven't specifically used code like this, but I do use a dynamic page 
system (a more advanced version of the '?p=mypage' system commonly 
seen). To avoid letting people include stuff they should be able to, the 
page that processes all of this basically has an array where I set which 
pages it's allowed to access. Anything other than the ones in that list 
goes to my error page. Something like this is probably
the easier, but at the same time, most secure method to accomplish 
something where a page is dynamically included.


Christian Snodgrass

Chris Knowles wrote:

John Horner wrote:
  

Maybe it's just me, but this:

--

$type = $_GET['type'];
$fileName = $_GET['filename'] . . . $type;

$mimeType = application/$type;
if (strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], 'MSIE 5') or
strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'], 'Opera 7')) $mimeType =
'application/x-download';
   
header(content-disposition: attachment; filename =

\$fileName\);
header(content-type: {$mimeType});
   
readfile($fileName);


where the link would be download.php?filename=mypdftype=pdf




I guess to be fair, the author may have simplified the code and not
detailed the step of validating the input and ensuring it maps to a
legitimate resource. However, I guess the point is that there may be
people on this list with limited server side knowledge who would cut and
paste something like this, so we should all be careful when submitting code.

Chris Knowles


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