m.a. and Jason go into philosophy.

Firstly: eternal is not a time limit, not even with that questionable
figment of "time" we use in our imaging about our universe (for visualizing
a 'physical' system).

Secondly it does not seem so safe to step out from our restricted and widely
accepted solipsism of the so far learned (partially un-understood?)
'physical world' figments - using those terms we deduced from within such
system (oscillatory, holographic, etc.).

Thirdly: with infinite (not a number) ingredients potentially participating
in unlimited Big Bangs (if we suppose such at all in terms of our
yesterday's physical knowledge) in unrestricted topical variations - the
probability (pardon me for that word what I find immaterial) of a TOTAL
match between such events is negligible (call it zero?)

And to Jason's "Lastly":  I salute your indecisiveness about the term 'time'
and its consequences, relativity or not.

John M

On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 10:39 PM, Jason Resch <jasonre...@gmail.com> wrote:

>
>
>  On Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 8:47 PM, m.a. <marty...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>
>>  Given modern physics and cosmology, does Nietzsche's idea of "eternal
>> return" have any validity?    m.a.
>>
>> --
>
>
> In a few ways I think it could be argued that it does.  One is the
> oscillatory universe idea, which will happen if the mass of the universe is
> below a certain threshold or if the expansion rate is not constant and will
> decrease.  Currently it seems to be accelerating, however.  It is theorized
> (I think by Loop Quantum Gravity or string theory) that at a point when all
> the matter in the universe comes to a single point (or close to that)
> gravity will momentarily reverse and cause a new expansion.  According to
> the holographic principle, there is a finite number of ways the matter in a
> finite volume of space can be arranged, so eventually the pattern will
> repeat.
>
> Also, by eternal inflation you could say there are an infinite number of
> big-bangs, and again some of them would be duplicates of the observable
> universe.
>
> Lastly, you might argue that relativity's proposal of a 4-dimensional
> space-time means we are always in every moment, which perhaps has similar
> implications to the idea of living every moment of one's life an infinite
> number of times.
>
> Jason
>
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