Re: new cat

2008-02-14 Thread catatonya
My positive is 9 years old!
  Welcome to the list.
  tonya

Lynne [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Hi all.
   
  I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find on 
feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6 years 
of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat because 
all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly wanting 
attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy and sell 
site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  Knowing who 
I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  Anyway, my 
husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him to have a 
good home.
   
  Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the 
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a terrible 
case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell us he had 
tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded 
with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we 
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This 
weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm just 
curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to believe 
he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as fact.  
   
  Lynne



RE: new cat

2008-02-06 Thread Caroline Kaufmann

Hi Lynne.  Thanks for taking in this baby and doing all that you have for him.  
I think that's great.  Definitely keep him if he is asymptomatic right now.  
Any vet that recommends a cat that has tested positive for Felv ONE TIME and is 
asymptomatic is a quack (in my opinion).  The veterinary profession has come a 
long way in extending the lives of these cats and any vet that does not 
recognize that is not up on his/her research.  There can be false positives 
with these tests, so it is recommended he be retested again in 6 months.  
Please see my other recent post regarding Buzz b/c it has a lot of the same 
information about retesting.
 
In addition, if you are going to keep him, you should look for a vet that is 
committed to proactively treating asymptomatic Felv cats.  Do your research.  
Vet hop if you have to, but it is worth it to screen and to find the right 
vet who regularly treats Felv+ cats, is up on the research and will work with 
you to extend the cat's life.  There are many immune boosting things you can do 
yourself now to help your cat.  Also, a high quality diet is key.  There is an 
online group that is devoted to the discussion of a high quality diet for cats 
(especially cats with immune disorders) and I recommend you join it.  I am 
somewhat up on the research of the importance of diet, but not near as much as 
these people.  I will get the website address and post it here in a few.  
 
Keep in mind that no one can tell you how long your cat will live.  There are 
so many variables and because of that, it is ALWAYS worth trying- especially 
when they are asymptomatic.  Please read thru the archives b/c many people have 
asked this very same question and the answers are always the same-- we don't 
know, but it's worth a try.  Especially if you start proactively working to 
make him comfortable, reduce his stress (very key) and boost his immune system, 
there really is no limit to where he can go.  One of my vets had an Felv cat 
live to be 12 and then she died of something completely unrelated- she never 
even became symptomatic and never even suffered from the Felv.  So there are 
success stories out there like that.  And remember, all cats will die.  It 
sucks.  They will almost always leave us before we are ready and no cat will 
ever live to be 30 yo!  So from the minute we take them in and start to love 
them, their time with us is limited and all we can do in the meantime is shower 
them with love and affection and give them the best life possible.  
 
caroline 


From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]: [EMAIL PROTECTED]: new catDate: Tue, 5 Feb 2008 
18:54:13 -0500



Hi all.
 
I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find on 
feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6 years 
of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat because 
all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly wanting 
attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy and sell 
site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  Knowing who 
I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  Anyway, my 
husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him to have a 
good home.
 
Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the 
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a terrible 
case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell us he had 
tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded 
with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we 
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This 
weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm just 
curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to believe 
he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as fact.  
 
Lynne
_
Need to know the score, the latest news, or you need your HotmailĀ®-get your 
fix.
http://www.msnmobilefix.com/Default.aspx

Re: new cat

2008-02-06 Thread Lynne
Thank you Caroline.  You make a very good point.  I do intend to have him 
retested in a few months.  I work in the medical field and am somewhat familiar 
with  false positives and inadequate testing.  I'm not gonna let one simple 
test decide that he has this disease.  However, even if he does have it, it 
matters not one bit.  He's here to stay.  We absolutely love him to pieces, 
even the 19 year old is accepting him which I was worried about because Lennie 
has never had another cat in the house.  We've only ever had 2 feline pets and 
both have reached 19 so the thought of BooBoo not making it to a ripe old age 
came as a bit of a blow to me.  I know it shouldn't but we treat our cats like 
little gods.  I'm going to keep on reading and educating myself about this and 
do the best I can with the situation.

Lynne
  - Original Message - 
  From: Caroline Kaufmann 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2008 12:13 PM
  Subject: RE: new cat


  Hi Lynne.  Thanks for taking in this baby and doing all that you have for 
him.  I think that's great.  Definitely keep him if he is asymptomatic right 
now.  Any vet that recommends a cat that has tested positive for Felv ONE TIME 
and is asymptomatic is a quack (in my opinion).  The veterinary profession has 
come a long way in extending the lives of these cats and any vet that does not 
recognize that is not up on his/her research.  There can be false positives 
with these tests, so it is recommended he be retested again in 6 months.  
Please see my other recent post regarding Buzz b/c it has a lot of the same 
information about retesting.
   
  In addition, if you are going to keep him, you should look for a vet that is 
committed to proactively treating asymptomatic Felv cats.  Do your research.  
Vet hop if you have to, but it is worth it to screen and to find the right 
vet who regularly treats Felv+ cats, is up on the research and will work with 
you to extend the cat's life.  There are many immune boosting things you can do 
yourself now to help your cat.  Also, a high quality diet is key.  There is an 
online group that is devoted to the discussion of a high quality diet for cats 
(especially cats with immune disorders) and I recommend you join it.  I am 
somewhat up on the research of the importance of diet, but not near as much as 
these people.  I will get the website address and post it here in a few.  
   
  Keep in mind that no one can tell you how long your cat will live.  There are 
so many variables and because of that, it is ALWAYS worth trying- especially 
when they are asymptomatic.  Please read thru the archives b/c many people have 
asked this very same question and the answers are always the same-- we don't 
know, but it's worth a try.  Especially if you start proactively working to 
make him comfortable, reduce his stress (very key) and boost his immune system, 
there really is no limit to where he can go.  One of my vets had an Felv cat 
live to be 12 and then she died of something completely unrelated- she never 
even became symptomatic and never even suffered from the Felv.  So there are 
success stories out there like that.  And remember, all cats will die.  It 
sucks.  They will almost always leave us before we are ready and no cat will 
ever live to be 30 yo!  So from the minute we take them in and start to love 
them, their time with us is limited and all we can do in the meantime is shower 
them with love and affection and give them the best life possible.  
   
  caroline 





From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: new cat
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2008 18:54:13 -0500


Hi all.

I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find 
on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6 
years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat 
because all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly 
wanting attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy 
and sell site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  
Knowing who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  
Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him 
to have a good home.

Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the 
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a terrible 
case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell us he had 
tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded 
with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we 
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This 
weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's

RE: new cat

2008-02-06 Thread Caroline Kaufmann

That's great!  Your medical training will come in very handy then because this 
virus is such a virus in the true sense of the term.  That's how my Monkee 
could present as absolutely healthy for 4 years (not even a UTI or upper 
respiratory infection!- nothing) and then suddenly be struck down with symptoms 
when the virus became active.  
 
We've only had one cat (no felv or anything) make it to 19 and we thought we 
were really something special!  But 2, wow!  Yes, I was the same way when I 
took Monkee in at the end of law school-- my mom still had the 3 kittens from a 
litter from a stray that were born when I was ten years old living at home with 
her at the time.  They were of course all geriatric and driving my mom crazy 
because she thought it was time about every other day!  So I was used to cats 
living to be 17, 18 and 19!  The good thing is that after 2 of them finally 
passed relatively close together and we were left with admittedly, my favorite 
of the litter- Rambo- alone for the first time in his life at age 17, I rescued 
an unspayed 1 yo white cat and dumped her on my mom (b/c I had Monkee and 
couldn't take her in).  At first, it was a little weird between them- the 1 yo 
and the old man- but eventually they came to love each other in their own odd 
little way and my mom and I swear up and down that we got two more quality 
years out of Rambo b/c we brought him this kitten!  So there is something to be 
said for a younger cat infusing life into an older one, even if it's 
accomplished begrudgingly!
caroline 


From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]: [EMAIL PROTECTED]: Re: new catDate: Wed, 6 Feb 2008 
15:14:25 -0500



Thank you Caroline.  You make a very good point.  I do intend to have him 
retested in a few months.  I work in the medical field and am somewhat familiar 
with  false positives and inadequate testing.  I'm not gonna let one simple 
test decide that he has this disease.  However, even if he does have it, it 
matters not one bit.  He's here to stay.  We absolutely love him to pieces, 
even the 19 year old is accepting him which I was worried about because Lennie 
has never had another cat in the house.  We've only ever had 2 feline pets and 
both have reached 19 so the thought of BooBoo not making it to a ripe old age 
came as a bit of a blow to me.  I know it shouldn't but we treat our cats like 
little gods.  I'm going to keep on reading and educating myself about this and 
do the best I can with the situation.
 
Lynne

- Original Message - 
From: Caroline Kaufmann 
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2008 12:13 PM
Subject: RE: new cat
Hi Lynne.  Thanks for taking in this baby and doing all that you have for him.  
I think that's great.  Definitely keep him if he is asymptomatic right now.  
Any vet that recommends a cat that has tested positive for Felv ONE TIME and is 
asymptomatic is a quack (in my opinion).  The veterinary profession has come a 
long way in extending the lives of these cats and any vet that does not 
recognize that is not up on his/her research.  There can be false positives 
with these tests, so it is recommended he be retested again in 6 months.  
Please see my other recent post regarding Buzz b/c it has a lot of the same 
information about retesting. In addition, if you are going to keep him, you 
should look for a vet that is committed to proactively treating asymptomatic 
Felv cats.  Do your research.  Vet hop if you have to, but it is worth it to 
screen and to find the right vet who regularly treats Felv+ cats, is up on the 
research and will work with you to extend the cat's life.  There are many 
immune boosting things you can do yourself now to help your cat.  Also, a high 
quality diet is key.  There is an online group that is devoted to the 
discussion of a high quality diet for cats (especially cats with immune 
disorders) and I recommend you join it.  I am somewhat up on the research of 
the importance of diet, but not near as much as these people.  I will get the 
website address and post it here in a few.   Keep in mind that no one can tell 
you how long your cat will live.  There are so many variables and because of 
that, it is ALWAYS worth trying- especially when they are asymptomatic.  Please 
read thru the archives b/c many people have asked this very same question and 
the answers are always the same-- we don't know, but it's worth a try.  
Especially if you start proactively working to make him comfortable, reduce his 
stress (very key) and boost his immune system, there really is no limit to 
where he can go.  One of my vets had an Felv cat live to be 12 and then she 
died of something completely unrelated- she never even became symptomatic and 
never even suffered from the Felv.  So there are success stories out there like 
that.  And remember, all cats will die.  It sucks.  They will almost always 
leave us before we are ready and no cat will ever live to be 30 yo!  So from 
the minute we take them

RE: new cat

2008-02-06 Thread MacKenzie, Kerry N.
Your comment  I know it shouldn't but we treat our cats like little
gods.  made me smile Lynne. I'm completely shameless about treating
mine like little gods and goddesses. As long as they're not too mean to
each other, and don't run the risk of harming themselves, I pretty well
let em get away with murder. The way I see it, they don't ever have to
go out in the world and get on with other people so it's ok to spoil
em rotten!  
Thank you for giving BooBoo the wonderful forever home he deserves.
These people are unscrupulous indeed--and worse. (I don't normally
approve of capital punishment but when I hear stories like this)
Wishing you and BooBoo many happy years together!
Kerry

  _  

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Lynne
Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2008 2:14 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: new cat


Thank you Caroline.  You make a very good point.  I do intend to have
him retested in a few months.  I work in the medical field and am
somewhat familiar with  false positives and inadequate testing.  I'm not
gonna let one simple test decide that he has this disease.  However,
even if he does have it, it matters not one bit.  He's here to stay.  We
absolutely love him to pieces, even the 19 year old is accepting him
which I was worried about because Lennie has never had another cat in
the house.  We've only ever had 2 feline pets and both have reached 19
so the thought of BooBoo not making it to a ripe old age came as a bit
of a blow to me.  I know it shouldn't but we treat our cats like little
gods.  I'm going to keep on reading and educating myself about this and
do the best I can with the situation.
 
Lynne

- Original Message - 
From: Caroline Kaufmann mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]  
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2008 12:13 PM
Subject: RE: new cat

Hi Lynne.  Thanks for taking in this baby and doing all that you
have for him.  I think that's great.  Definitely keep him if he is
asymptomatic right now.  Any vet that recommends a cat that has tested
positive for Felv ONE TIME and is asymptomatic is a quack (in my
opinion).  The veterinary profession has come a long way in extending
the lives of these cats and any vet that does not recognize that is not
up on his/her research.  There can be false positives with these tests,
so it is recommended he be retested again in 6 months.  Please see my
other recent post regarding Buzz b/c it has a lot of the same
information about retesting.
 
In addition, if you are going to keep him, you should look for a
vet that is committed to proactively treating asymptomatic Felv cats.
Do your research.  Vet hop if you have to, but it is worth it to
screen and to find the right vet who regularly treats Felv+ cats, is up
on the research and will work with you to extend the cat's life.  There
are many immune boosting things you can do yourself now to help your
cat.  Also, a high quality diet is key.  There is an online group that
is devoted to the discussion of a high quality diet for cats (especially
cats with immune disorders) and I recommend you join it.  I am somewhat
up on the research of the importance of diet, but not near as much as
these people.  I will get the website address and post it here in a few.

 
Keep in mind that no one can tell you how long your cat will
live.  There are so many variables and because of that, it is ALWAYS
worth trying- especially when they are asymptomatic.  Please read thru
the archives b/c many people have asked this very same question and the
answers are always the same-- we don't know, but it's worth a try.
Especially if you start proactively working to make him comfortable,
reduce his stress (very key) and boost his immune system, there really
is no limit to where he can go.  One of my vets had an Felv cat live to
be 12 and then she died of something completely unrelated- she never
even became symptomatic and never even suffered from the Felv.  So there
are success stories out there like that.  And remember, all cats will
die.  It sucks.  They will almost always leave us before we are ready
and no cat will ever live to be 30 yo!  So from the minute we take them
in and start to love them, their time with us is limited and all we can
do in the meantime is shower them with love and affection and give them
the best life possible.  
 
caroline 




  _  

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: new cat
Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2008 18:54:13 -0500


Hi all.
 
I just joined this list after doing all the reading I
possibly could find on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan
male cat around 5 to 6 years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.
I was familiar

Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Pat Kachur
Lynne - I adopted a new kitty last July.  Mandy also tested positive for 
leukemia.  I loved her immediately so I never considered anything but keeping 
her.  She is thriving.  I feed her Wellness canned food (mixing in some lysine 
and Missing Link) and Nutro dry food.  She is more than six years old and you 
would never know she is anything but perfectly healthy.  She eats like a small 
horse, plays most of the day and loves me.  Hopefully you will have the same 
experience.

Pat
  - Original Message - 
  From: Lynne 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 6:54 PM
  Subject: new cat


  Hi all.

  I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find on 
feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6 years 
of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat because 
all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly wanting 
attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy and sell 
site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  Knowing who 
I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  Anyway, my 
husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him to have a 
good home.

  Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the 
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a terrible 
case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell us he had 
tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded 
with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we 
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This 
weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm just 
curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to believe 
he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as fact.  

  Lynne

Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Tad Burnett

Hi Lynne
 The rough numbers say 2/3's will be gone in 2 years...
That leaves 1/3 that will make it past 2 years and they will commonly
live to 8 years or longer...
Tad


Lynne wrote:


Hi all.
 
I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could 
find on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat 
around 5 to 6 years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was 
familiar with the cat because all summer he would come over to our 
house and hang around, mostly wanting attention and something to eat.  
Recently I discovered he was on a buy and sell site and immediately 
called the owners desparate to purchase him.  Knowing who I am the 
price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  Anyway, my 
husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him to 
have a good home.
 
Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all 
the horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for 
a terrible case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet 
called to tell us he had tested positive for feline leukemia and 
wanted to know how much we had bonded with him and our options.  After 
what seemed like hours of crying I decided we were going to keep him 
as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This weekend he is 
going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm 
just curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been 
lead to believe he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just 
cannot accept this as fact. 
 
Lynne





Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Lynne
Thanks for the encouraging news about your Mandy Pat.  We're still trying to 
modify our boy's diet.  I bought this food called Medi-Cal hypoallergenic diet 
from the vets because he was having diarrhea and terrible gas.  He finally had 
a solid bowel movement yesterday and seems to like the food but his favorite 
seems to be tuna and salmon, the human stuff.  He's really loveable and 
seemingly fine health wise so we're just gonna make sure he's well taken care 
of and given lots of love and attention.

Lynne
  - Original Message - 
  From: Pat Kachur 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 7:10 PM
  Subject: Re: new cat


  Lynne - I adopted a new kitty last July.  Mandy also tested positive for 
leukemia.  I loved her immediately so I never considered anything but keeping 
her.  She is thriving.  I feed her Wellness canned food (mixing in some lysine 
and Missing Link) and Nutro dry food.  She is more than six years old and you 
would never know she is anything but perfectly healthy.  She eats like a small 
horse, plays most of the day and loves me.  Hopefully you will have the same 
experience.

  Pat



Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Lynne
Well that's happy news Tad  Since our cat is between 4 to 6 and well, maybe 
he'll be around for a good length of time.
Lynne
  - Original Message - 
  From: Tad Burnett 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 7:41 PM
  Subject: Re: new cat


  Hi Lynne
The rough numbers say 2/3's will be gone in 2 years...
  That leaves 1/3 that will make it past 2 years and they will commonly
  live to 8 years or longer...
  Tad


  Lynne wrote:

Hi all.

I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find 
on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6 
years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat 
because all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly 
wanting attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy 
and sell site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  
Knowing who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  
Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him 
to have a good home.

Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the 
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a terrible 
case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell us he had 
tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded 
with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we 
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This 
weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm just 
curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to believe 
he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as fact.  

Lynne




RE: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Chris
Lynne

Have one FELV+ who will be 10 years next month.  She's a hefty 18 lbs and
the only problem (other than overeating!) she's had is a few episodes of
very low white blood count.  Vet got the count up pretty quickly with
immuno-regulin.  My other FELV+, Romeo, is probably a year or so
younger-he's a stray I fed outside for a couple of years before bringing him
in.  He's only had some gum problems which though fairly easy to treat, for
him is a bit tough as its difficult to pill him.   

 

I feed them Wellness wet food with a very little bit of Iams dry food.  

 

 

 

Christiane Biagi

914-632-4672

Cell:  914-720-6888

 mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] [EMAIL PROTECTED]

 

Katrina Animal Reunion Team (KART)

 http://www.findkpets.org www.findkpets.org

 

Join Us  Help Reunite Katrina-displaced Families with their Animals

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Lynne
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 6:54 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: new cat

 

Hi all.

 

I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find on
feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6
years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat
because all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly
wanting attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a
buy and sell site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase
him.  Knowing who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple
minutes.  Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this little guy and
just wanted him to have a good home.

 

Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a
terrible case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to
tell us he had tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how
much we had bonded with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours
of crying I decided we were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy
which he is now.  This weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised
by the vet.  This will be strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and
is adorable.  I'm just curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than
I've been lead to believe he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just
cannot accept this as fact.  

 

Lynne



Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Marylyn
Dixie came into my life as a throw-away who showed up at my mother's.   
I liked her and took her to my vet several months later to have her  
spayed, intending to take her to my farm as a barn cat.  He tested  
her (she was still nameless) and she was FELV+.  He explained the  
options and was very relieved when I took all of them off the table.   
Dixie stayed in a garage for a while then moved up to being a house  
trailer cat and now lives on the farm as the Junior Partner in the  
firm of Person and Cat with her own bedroom (as well as run of one  
floor of the house---I'm building and the basement is not safe yet), a  
10 x 10 x 6 foot kennel with a topper for good weather,  
etc...no, she is not spoiled.  She spoils me with all the love  
and joy she has given me.  She came into my life about 3 years ago and  
is extremely healthy.  She has been retested a couple of times then I  
got tired of itit simply doesn't matter what the results are.  She  
eats a very good diet with no grains and extra veggies providing lots  
of Vitamin A and C, raw as well as processed meats, and various  
supplements as feels right at the time.  Colostrum, various  
homeopathic supplements, Interfreon, Petz Life Brush Away.I,  
too, came to this list with questions.  Dixie and I realize that life  
is not a certain thing and I am accepting the fact that no one knows  
when or how they are living.  Concentrating on when a loved one may  
leave ---it doesn't' matter how many legs, how healthy or sickly they  
appear, or what the doctors/vets say.  We are all dying and start  
dying the day we are born.  Dwelling on that or the length of life  
only destroys the wonderful time you can have together.  Dixie is a  
totally perfect cat.  She travels wonderfully, adjusts to everything  
including the constant construction at her home, and is a wonderful  
hunter and friend.
She came into my life a little over 3 years ago and, this June, is the  
anniversary of her person owning life.  She may or may not get  
sick.we'll deal with that when and if it happens.  After all, we  
all decline in health.  She is very healthy and happy now and that is  
what matters.


Yes.  Your friend can live much longer or die suddenly from something  
totally unrelated to FeLV+.  You can do the same.  Enjoy the wonderful  
time you  have together.  Everyday I celebrate Dixie's life.


Oh, yes...had she not tested positive she would have been a barn/ 
porch cat.  Now she owns the house.  And my heart.

 On Feb 5, 2008, at 5:54 PM, Lynne wrote


Hi all.

I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could  
find on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat  
around 5 to 6 years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was  
familiar with the cat because all summer he would come over to our  
house and hang around, mostly wanting attention and something to  
eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy and sell site and  
immediately called the owners desperate to purchase him.  Knowing  
who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.   
Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just  
wanted him to have a good home.


Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all  
the horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated  
for a terrible case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet  
called to tell us he had tested positive for feline leukemia and  
wanted to know how much we had bonded with him and our options.   
After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we were going to  
keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This weekend  
he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will  
be strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.   
I'm just curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've  
been lead to believe he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I  
just cannot accept this as fact.


Lynne




Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Jane Lyons

Hi Lynne
I've found that feeding the best quality food possible, finding the  
right supplements to boost immunity and a
stress free and loving environment does wonders. You might want to  
get him on supplements to support
his immune system before and after his surgery (neutering).  There is  
a lot of information in the archives as

well.
 We've all experienced the horrible shock and grief that a FeLV  
diagnosis brings, but have learned that these
kitties are always very special and have taught many of us lessons in  
gratitude and living in the moment.


There are many knowledgeable people on the list to help you. Welcome!
Jane


On Feb 5, 2008, at 7:47 PM, Lynne wrote:

Well that's happy news Tad  Since our cat is between 4 to 6 and  
well, maybe he'll be around for a good length of time.

Lynne
- Original Message -
From: Tad Burnett
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 7:41 PM
Subject: Re: new cat

Hi Lynne
  The rough numbers say 2/3's will be gone in 2 years...
That leaves 1/3 that will make it past 2 years and they will commonly
live to 8 years or longer...
Tad


Lynne wrote:

Hi all.

I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly  
could find on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan  
male cat around 5 to 6 years of age from a rather unscrupulous  
family.  I was familiar with the cat because all summer he would  
come over to our house and hang around, mostly wanting attention  
and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy and  
sell site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase  
him.  Knowing who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a  
couple minutes.  Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this  
little guy and just wanted him to have a good home.


Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of  
all the horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and  
treated for a terrible case of earmites.  We no sooner got home  
than the vet called to tell us he had tested positive for feline  
leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded with him and  
our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we  
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is  
now.  This weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by  
the vet.  This will be strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very  
well and is adorable.  I'm just curious.  Does he have a chance at  
a longer life than I've been lead to believe he has.  I'm hearing  
a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as fact.


Lynne







Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Lynne
Thank you Jane.  BooBoo (we didn't name him) is on a good diet now and 
seemingly in very good health and I think he feels really well having had a 
conditioning bath and grooming.  I think the little guy is clean for the first 
time in his life.  I talked to the vet about supplements and he didn't feel 
they were necessary at this time but I want him to have his blood checked 
periodically to make sure everything is ok.  As for neutering, our vet wants to 
do it ASAP.  I do trust this guy.  We have a Maine Coon who is 19 years old and 
on thyroid medication now and doing really well so I believe this vet who has 
taken care of him. He tells me that neutered males have less chance of 
developing prostate cancer and his urine won't smell as strong as it does now.  
BooBoo is a very clean cat but his pee does smell horribly strong.  The vet 
said neutering should help this, something I never knew, probably because the 
only 2 cats we've ever owned were neutered quite young.

Lynne
  - Original Message - 
  From: Jane Lyons 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 8:18 PM
  Subject: Re: new cat


  Hi Lynne
  I've found that feeding the best quality food possible, finding the right 
supplements to boost immunity and a
  stress free and loving environment does wonders. You might want to get him on 
supplements to support
  his immune system before and after his surgery (neutering).  There is a lot 
of information in the archives as
  well.
   We've all experienced the horrible shock and grief that a FeLV diagnosis 
brings, but have learned that these
  kitties are always very special and have taught many of us lessons in 
gratitude and living in the moment.


  There are many knowledgeable people on the list to help you. Welcome!
  Jane




  On Feb 5, 2008, at 7:47 PM, Lynne wrote:


Well that's happy news Tad  Since our cat is between 4 to 6 and well, maybe 
he'll be around for a good length of time.
Lynne
  - Original Message -
  From: Tad Burnett
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 7:41 PM
  Subject: Re: new cat


  Hi Lynne
The rough numbers say 2/3's will be gone in 2 years...
  That leaves 1/3 that will make it past 2 years and they will commonly
  live to 8 years or longer...
  Tad


  Lynne wrote:

Hi all.

I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could 
find on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 
6 years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat 
because all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly 
wanting attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy 
and sell site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  
Knowing who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  
Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him 
to have a good home.

Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all 
the horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a 
terrible case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell 
us he had tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we 
had bonded with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I 
decided we were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now. 
 This weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This 
will be strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm 
just curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to 
believe he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as 
fact. 

Lynne








Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread laurieskatz
Hi Lynn, my Squeaky and Stripes tested positive. Squeak lived a healthy life 
until age 22 years. Stripes was sick on and off and lived to age 16 years. This 
was before vets (or guardians) knew much and they VACCINATED them for this year 
after year. Squeaky always got sick for 3 days after being vaccinated. Anyway, 
have hope and give him lots of love and no stress.  The neutering can stress 
him so make sure he's in tip top shape before you do that. Check out some of 
the maintenance suggestions for feline leuk positive kitties such as using 
interferon. Good luck and THANK-YOU for rescuing this kitty from his previous 
situation. Wonder if you could bring any sort of neglect charge agst the other 
family. That said, we don't generally press charges here as it means we have to 
relinquish the animal.
Laurie
  - Original Message - 
  From: Lynne 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 5:54 PM
  Subject: new cat


  Hi all.

  I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find on 
feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6 years 
of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat because 
all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly wanting 
attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy and sell 
site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  Knowing who 
I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  Anyway, my 
husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him to have a 
good home.

  Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the 
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a terrible 
case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell us he had 
tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded 
with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we 
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This 
weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm just 
curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to believe 
he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as fact.  

  Lynne

Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread laurieskatz
btw we now have Isabella, a stray who kept coming for food and tested positive 
for feline leukemia. She had a rough time of it last summer but is doing great. 
Her weight has almost doubled! She has been adopted by my friend Lisa. She 
takes prednisone and tramadal (pain med) and Lisa gives her interferon 7 days 
on and 7 days off. Lis feeds Innova EVO dry. Bella loves it. She gets some 
canned food, too, but loves her EVO
Laurie (ps the only thing I don't love about the name BooBoo is that those 
other people named him. I love the name!)
  - Original Message - 
  From: Lynne 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 7:37 PM
  Subject: Re: new cat


  Thank you Jane.  BooBoo (we didn't name him) is on a good diet now and 
seemingly in very good health and I think he feels really well having had a 
conditioning bath and grooming.  I think the little guy is clean for the first 
time in his life.  I talked to the vet about supplements and he didn't feel 
they were necessary at this time but I want him to have his blood checked 
periodically to make sure everything is ok.  As for neutering, our vet wants to 
do it ASAP.  I do trust this guy.  We have a Maine Coon who is 19 years old and 
on thyroid medication now and doing really well so I believe this vet who has 
taken care of him. He tells me that neutered males have less chance of 
developing prostate cancer and his urine won't smell as strong as it does now.  
BooBoo is a very clean cat but his pee does smell horribly strong.  The vet 
said neutering should help this, something I never knew, probably because the 
only 2 cats we've ever owned were neutered quite young.

  Lynne
- Original Message - 
From: Jane Lyons 
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 8:18 PM
Subject: Re: new cat


Hi Lynne 
I've found that feeding the best quality food possible, finding the right 
supplements to boost immunity and a
stress free and loving environment does wonders. You might want to get him 
on supplements to support
his immune system before and after his surgery (neutering).  There is a lot 
of information in the archives as
well.
 We've all experienced the horrible shock and grief that a FeLV diagnosis 
brings, but have learned that these
kitties are always very special and have taught many of us lessons in 
gratitude and living in the moment.


There are many knowledgeable people on the list to help you. Welcome!
Jane




On Feb 5, 2008, at 7:47 PM, Lynne wrote:


  Well that's happy news Tad  Since our cat is between 4 to 6 and well, 
maybe he'll be around for a good length of time.
  Lynne
- Original Message -
From: Tad Burnett
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 7:41 PM
Subject: Re: new cat


Hi Lynne
  The rough numbers say 2/3's will be gone in 2 years...
That leaves 1/3 that will make it past 2 years and they will commonly
live to 8 years or longer...
Tad


Lynne wrote:

  Hi all.

  I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could 
find on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 
6 years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat 
because all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly 
wanting attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy 
and sell site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  
Knowing who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  
Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him 
to have a good home.

  Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all 
the horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a 
terrible case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell 
us he had tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we 
had bonded with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I 
decided we were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now. 
 This weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This 
will be strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm 
just curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to 
believe he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as 
fact. 

  Lynne







Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Lynne
Thanks Laurie for this encouragement.  I've become angry at the people we got 
the cat from only because they have still have an add on a site selling two 
other cats, the one is a son of my cat and the other is a female.  These people 
don't believe in vets or neutering or spaying.  They have sent me a couple 
nasty emails saying they didn't believe my vet's diagnosis and that the cat had 
always been healthy and happy and had only seen a vet once when he was ill and 
almost died as a kitten.  They don't have a clue as to what this disease is and 
told me it was not transmittable and I was foolish to believe it could be 
fatal.  Also told me there was something wrong with me not to believe in 
miracles.  I'm dealing with some weird individuals here.  Anyhow, I own him and 
we love him to pieces and they will never see him again.  He's happy as can be 
here, clean, adorable and healthy.  I am kind of worried about the neutering 
but our vet says he's very much up to it and we'll have a better cat for it, so 
I need to trust him.  Besides, BooBoo likes the people there and travelling in 
the van.

Lynne
  - Original Message - 
  From: laurieskatz 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 9:25 PM
  Subject: Re: new cat


  Hi Lynn, my Squeaky and Stripes tested positive. Squeak lived a healthy life 
until age 22 years. Stripes was sick on and off and lived to age 16 years. This 
was before vets (or guardians) knew much and they VACCINATED them for this year 
after year. Squeaky always got sick for 3 days after being vaccinated. Anyway, 
have hope and give him lots of love and no stress.  The neutering can stress 
him so make sure he's in tip top shape before you do that. Check out some of 
the maintenance suggestions for feline leuk positive kitties such as using 
interferon. Good luck and THANK-YOU for rescuing this kitty from his previous 
situation. Wonder if you could bring any sort of neglect charge agst the other 
family. That said, we don't generally press charges here as it means we have to 
relinquish the animal.
  Laurie
- Original Message - 
From: Lynne 
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2008 5:54 PM
Subject: new cat


Hi all.

I just joined this list after doing all the reading I possibly could find 
on feline leukemia.  I recently acquired a Himalayan male cat around 5 to 6 
years of age from a rather unscrupulous family.  I was familiar with the cat 
because all summer he would come over to our house and hang around, mostly 
wanting attention and something to eat.  Recently I discovered he was on a buy 
and sell site and immediately called the owners desparate to purchase him.  
Knowing who I am the price went from 150 to 300 within a couple minutes.  
Anyway, my husband and I had grown to love this little guy and just wanted him 
to have a good home.

Yesterday we took him to the vet where he was groomed, shaved of all the 
horrible matting under his chest and legs, deflead and treated for a terrible 
case of earmites.  We no sooner got home than the vet called to tell us he had 
tested positive for feline leukemia and wanted to know how much we had bonded 
with him and our options.  After what seemed like hours of crying I decided we 
were going to keep him as long as he stayed healthy which he is now.  This 
weekend he is going to be neutered, strongly advised by the vet.  This will be 
strictly a housecat.  He's adjusted very well and is adorable.  I'm just 
curious.  Does he have a chance at a longer life than I've been lead to believe 
he has.  I'm hearing a couple of years and I just cannot accept this as fact.  

Lynne


Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Beth Gouldin
Dear Lynne

I have to say that I absorbed much of the encouragement that was meant for
you in those emails for myself! I have recently also joined this list
looking for hope against FeLV and everytime someone else joins I am further
encouraged.
Diet does seem to make  a difference in all the reading that I have done it
mentions the highest possible quality high protein diet. Well, I'm a firm
believer in the Prey Model Diet (otherwise known as Raw feeding or BARF) as
it fully suits those qualifications. Since BooBoo is already more interested
in human food - tuna/salmon, now might be a good time to try to transition
him to Raw. It's a process but some cats take to it better than others.
Someone else mentioned Raw feeding - there are many really wonderful
websites like:
www.rawfedcats.org
that have all the information needed to get started in Raw Feeding.  Our
Athena is entirely raw fed , whole prey (we use Rodent Pro.com) basically
initially by her own doing. Time will tell (as much as it really can with
this situation) as far as how beneficial the raw feeding is for them but I
really think that overall (even if she weren't sick) there would never be
any better food plan.
Anyway - off my soap box but think about it.

Good luck and warm wishes:)

Beth Gouldin
RIP Orion (to FELV)
Good Luck Athena (FELV +)


Re: new cat

2008-02-05 Thread Belinda Sauro

 Welcome Lynne,
   Bailey was positive when I found him at 5 months of age, he passed 
in May 2006, five days after turning 11 years old, he was never sick 
except for the last 6 months.


--

Belinda
happiness is being owned by cats ...

Be-Mi-Kitties
http://www.bemikitties.com

HostDesign4U.com [affordable hosting  web design]
http://www.hostdesign4u.com

ForYouByUs.com [custom printing]
http://www.foryoubyus.com




RE: new Cat Fancy

2007-09-24 Thread Melissa Lind
Wow Susan-you are so knowledgeable about the breeds. To me, it's the
black/white cat, the calico, the tabby. It's kind of like my mom and cars:
white car, red car, black truck, etc. Likewise, I'm not very aware when it
comes to the technical terms or the lingo for cat breeds. I'm interested
though, so I think I'll look up all the words in here that I have no visuals
for!

 

By the way-I love the name Naughty Lola! I know exactly what she's like
without meeting her. 

 

Melissa

 

  _  

From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of Susan Dubose
Sent: Sunday, September 23, 2007 8:15 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: new Cat Fancy

 

 

 

Ah, on the cover is a SelkirkRex, described as a British Shorthair
meets Rex  sometimes meets Persian

 

Finally, I have uncovered what look the Frankenbreeder from last year
was going for in my little Pugsley.

 

I kept saying to everyone (anyone that would listen!), he's so funny
looking, he's got curly fur but the face of a British Shorthair! Not like
the classic Rex!

 

So, apparently that IS a breed, but this loser was just playin' w
/genetics...

 

They come in either long or short furrage...

 

This is the same house that my Naughty Lola  Ursula (both felv+) came from,
Lola being a doll faced Persian  Ursula being a British Shorthair
Sealpoint

 

Looks like my little Pugsley on the cover only w/long fur, flamepoint  all!

 

He was a tough little cookie, medically..

 

He was @ the vet clinic for 6 months!

 

 

 

 

Susan J. DuBose  ^..^

www.petgirlspetsitting.com http://www.petgirlspetsitting.com/ 

www.tx.siameserescue.org http://www.tx.siameserescue.org/ 

www.shadowcats.net http://www.shadowcats.net/ 

 

A kitten is more amusing than half the people one

  is obligated to be with.

  Lady Sidney Morgan

 

  _  

Building a website is a piece of cake. 
Yahoo! Small Business gives you all
http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=48251/*http:/smallbusiness.yahoo.com/webhosting/
?p=PASSPORTPLUS  the tools to get online.



Re: New cat on the block

2006-12-19 Thread Jennifer Phaewryn O'Gwynn
Welcome to the list! Mr. Kitten sounds like he has a good mom. I think many
vets just refuse to learn new things. Just out of curiosity, has the vet
that told you to euthanise Mr. Kitten ever given him any vaccines? If so,
can you tell me where he gave them (neck, scruff, side, leg)? I ask because
if he's still giving vaccines in the scruff of the neck, he's obviously just
someone who refuses to embrace new technology and studies and is just a bad
vet for not continuing to work on his education. The most important thing is
to feed the very best quality food you can afford, like Wellness, Innova,
Chicken Soup, or other super-premium brands. Cat food should never contain
corn or corn ingredients. After that, then you start adding general immune
boosting supplements (same as you would  take to boost YOUR immune system)
like Vitamin C, Lysine, B Complex Vitamins, etc. Then you consider adding a
FELV specific treatment, like Interferon, Acemannan, or Immunoregulin. Lots
of it is just plain good nutrition, and I don't think any vet could argue
with adding extra immune boosting vitamins and minerals to an animal's diet!

Phaewryn

Please save Whitey! http://ucat.us/Whitey.html
VT low cost SpayNeuter, and Emergency Financial Assistance for cat owners:
http://ucat.us/VermontLowCost.html
Special Needs Cat Resources: http://ucat.us/domesticcatlinks.html


Re: New cat on the block

2006-12-19 Thread wendy
Hi Ashley,

I'm sorry to hear that Mr. Kitten is FeLV+, but happy
you have found us.  The two most important things you
can do to keep Mr. Kitten healthy is to keep him
stress-free and to get him on a great diet, which
includes immune-boosting supplements.  Many of us feed
our kitties Innova Evo, which has no grains as cats
cannot process grains, but there are other good cat
foods out there.  Pretty much anything you can buy at
Wal-Mart and most of what you can buy at Petco or
Petsmart are not good foods.  The good foods are
usually found at pet boutiques and online. 
Supplements that people usually use are L-lysine
(without the propynol glycol additive) and Vitamin C,
but there are others.  Again, welcome to the group
Ashley, and I hope that Mr. Kitten has many long years
ahead of him!

:)
Wendy
Dallas, Tx

__
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http://mail.yahoo.com 



Re: New cat on the block

2006-12-19 Thread Lilash3
 
Mr. Kitten has not received any vaccines since being diagnosed.  He  did 
receive a Prednisone shot that was administered in his neck, but I don't  know 
if 
that is the normal spot for that injection or not.  I live in a  smaller town 
so it's hard to find a wide range of vets, expecially ones that are  
interested in handling Felv+ cats, but I'm working on it.
 
In a message dated 12/19/2006 12:09:07 PM Pacific Standard Time,  
[EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

Welcome to the list! Mr. Kitten sounds  like he has a good mom. I think many 
vets just refuse to learn new things.  Just out of curiosity, has the vet that 
told you to euthanise Mr. Kitten ever  given him any vaccines? If so, can you 
tell me where he gave them (neck,  scruff, side, leg)? I ask because if he's 
still giving vaccines in the scruff  of the neck, he's obviously just someone 
who refuses to embrace new technology  and studies and is just a bad vet for 
not continuing to work on his  education. The most important thing is to feed 
the very best quality food you  can afford, like Wellness, Innova, Chicken 
Soup, or other super-premium  brands. Cat food should never contain corn or 
corn 
ingredients. After that,  then you start adding general immune boosting 
supplements (same as you  would  take to boost YOUR immune system) like Vitamin 
C, 
Lysine, B  Complex Vitamins, etc. Then you consider adding a FELV specific 
treatment,  like Interferon, Acemannan, or Immunoregulin. Lots of it is just 
plain  
good nutrition, and I don't think any vet could argue with adding extra 
immune  boosting vitamins and minerals to an animal's diet!

Phaewryn



 


Re: New cat on the block

2006-12-19 Thread Jennifer Phaewryn O'Gwynn
Nothing should ever be given in the neck on cats. They are prone to
injection site sarcoma, in other words, a big cancerous tumor can grow in
the location of any injections. Happens in every 1 in 1000 to 1 in 1
cats (studies vary on the frequency). Since you can't amputate the neck,
giving it in that location equals instant death sentence for any cat that
gets a sarcoma there (whereas if it's given in the lower leg, as it should
be, you can amputate the leg and save the cat). But, that proves my
suspicions, yes, your vet is VERY outdated and does NOT keep up with current
protocols. I suggest a different vet. Ask them Now if you were going to
give my cat a vaccine, where would you administer that, in the scruff? If
they says yes, forget that vet, try again. Remember though, just because you
may find one that is current on vaccination protocol, doesn't mean they will
be current on FELV treatment, it's just SOMEWHERE to start. Here's the
webpage on current vaccine protocols:
http://www.avma.org/vafstf/sitercmnd.asp


Phaewryn

Please save Whitey! http://ucat.us/Whitey.html
VT low cost SpayNeuter, and Emergency Financial Assistance for cat owners:
http://ucat.us/VermontLowCost.html
Special Needs Cat Resources: http://ucat.us/domesticcatlinks.html


Re: new cat coming--advice needed

2005-09-21 Thread Julie Johnson
Dear Kerry,

How wonderful that you have a new family member! He's a lucky little fellow to be going to your home!

I would try scent-swapping for a few days; give him a blanket and the other kitties a blanket and then trade them after a day and let them become accustomed to each other's smell. It's so hard to decide how to integrate. I generally do set up a cage at least for a couple of days; I think it helps the new kitty feel secure (I drape the cage with a blanket and raise it a little bit each day and give them a box to cuddle in) and everybody gets used to sounds and smells and then interest takes over! Sometimes a first reaction will get stuck in their wee heads and a even a good-natured cat can get off on the wrong foot, er, paw! After a few days I would open the cage door and start a play session; hopefully they'll all get involved and associate face-to-face contact with something pleasureable. Might want to have the sliced chicken breast ready, too!

As far as mixing them, I think I would. It sounds like Momcat is either naturally immune or (and I know this is miserable to contemplate) a latent carrier. 

I wish you all the best with your new little fellow!

Love, Julie"MacKenzie, Kerry N." [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Dear friends, I need some advice!

One of the NJ FeLV cats will be coming soon--possibly this Wed--to join my 2 remaining feral kitties (Mickie who's got FeLV, and Momcat who has tested neg twice).
Mickey and Momcat live in my 2nd bedroom.

I have 2 Qs--

1. d'you think Ineed to introducethe new little guyslowly--I'd have to keephim in my bedroom while I'm at work, which could mean he'll be on his own for long stretches. :( (It's such a long time since I've had to introduce anyone---my brood all came as an existing colony.) Little new guy, by the way, is supposed to be people-friendly. I'm hoping it will help bring my two round. 
Cherie, whodoes rescue---she's the angel that took all the NJ cats--said she didn't think I needed to keeplittle new guyseparate (like in a crate, the other option I mentioned to her). But everythingI read in the past says I should introduce them s-l-o-w-l-y. 

2. D'you think I should remove the negative cat, Momcat, from the room because otherwise she could contract FeLV from the new cat if it were a different strain of FeLV. (I'm very hazy on this stuff but I think I recall Sally in San Jose talking about different strains.)Momcat's never been vaccinated for FeLV. She's still scared, and I really don't want to upset her further at this point. I dream of integrating her woth my bunch one day. It will be awful trying to catch her--much worse than the kittens and they were difficult enough.

All opinions much appreciated!! Thanks in advanceKerry
=00

IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE. Any advice expressed above as to tax matters was neither written nor intended by the sender or Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw LLP to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, then (i) the advice was written to support the promotion or marketing (by a person other than Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw LLP) of that transaction or matter, and (ii) such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayers particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor

This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail. "I hold that, the more helpless a creature, the more entitled it is to protection by man from the cruelty of man. " "The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated." Mohandas Gandhi (1869-1948)Paws Come WITH Claws!!!If you're thinking about de-clawing your cat, you need to re-think your decision to acquire a pet.__Do You Yahoo!?Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com 

Re: new cat coming--advice needed

2005-09-19 Thread Cherie A Gabbert
I have had great success with introductions..actually I am introducing one right now.I keep the new one closed up for a day and take blanets out on the new ones room for the others to smell...then day two I leave the door open and let everyone meet (with me there of course) I do this 4 or five timesthen day three, fourI keep the door open ONLY when I am at home, there is usually a lot of hissing but that is it by day five an I keep it open at night when I can listen then by day six and seven they are pretty used to each other, so the new one may hide but often enough one of the others has taken her under their wing.

GODD LUCK :-))"MacKenzie, Kerry N." [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


Dear friends, I need some advice!

One of the NJ FeLV cats will be coming soon--possibly this Wed--to join my 2 remaining feral kitties (Mickie who's got FeLV, and Momcat who has tested neg twice).
Mickey and Momcat live in my 2nd bedroom.

I have 2 Qs--

1. d'you think Ineed to introducethe new little guyslowly--I'd have to keephim in my bedroom while I'm at work, which could mean he'll be on his own for long stretches. :( (It's such a long time since I've had to introduce anyone---my brood all came as an existing colony.) Little new guy, by the way, is supposed to be people-friendly. I'm hoping it will help bring my two round. 
Cherie, whodoes rescue---she's the angel that took all the NJ cats--said she didn't think I needed to keeplittle new guyseparate (like in a crate, the other option I mentioned to her). But everythingI read in the past says I should introduce them s-l-o-w-l-y. 

2. D'you think I should remove the negative cat, Momcat, from the room because otherwise she could contract FeLV from the new cat if it were a different strain of FeLV. (I'm very hazy on this stuff but I think I recall Sally in San Jose talking about different strains.)Momcat's never been vaccinated for FeLV. She's still scared, and I really don't want to upset her further at this point. I dream of integrating her woth my bunch one day. It will be awful trying to catch her--much worse than the kittens and they were difficult enough.

All opinions much appreciated!! Thanks in advanceKerry
=00

IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE. Any advice expressed above as to tax matters was neither written nor intended by the sender or Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw LLP to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, then (i) the advice was written to support the promotion or marketing (by a person other than Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw LLP) of that transaction or matter, and (ii) such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayers particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor

This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail. Have a purrfect day
Cherie


RE: new cat coming--advice needed

2005-09-19 Thread Hideyo Yamamoto
Title: Message








I think you got all the key points!
The magic word for introduction of new cat(s) is  do it verrry
s-l-o-w-l-y for both ends  for existing kitties and new kitties  

We want to make sure that both sides has a
place to get away if they are not comfortable with situation so that they are
not stuck there  



Thats said, I would first put a new
kitty in a separate room, and have her get used to you and the smell of your
house first - then, you might want to slowly introduce to your kitties
either through screen door between the rooms , and then, put a new kitty in the
crate in the rest of the rooms while you are home.. etc.. once the
damage is done, its very difficult to undo (speaking of my bitter
experience) --- as long as you take it slow, everything should go well  



Older kitties are, slower you want to take



Kerry, I am sure that everything will work
just fine! 



Hideyo











From:
[EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
On Behalf Of MacKenzie, Kerry N.
Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005
10:37 AM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: new cat coming--advice
needed







Dear friends, I need some advice!











One of the NJ FeLV cats will be coming
soon--possibly this Wed--to join my 2 remaining feral kitties (Mickie who's got
FeLV, and Momcat who has tested neg twice).





Mickey and Momcat live in my 2nd bedroom.











I have 2 Qs--











1. d'you think
Ineed to introducethe new little guyslowly--I'd have to
keephim in my bedroom while I'm at work, which could mean he'll be on his
own for long stretches. :( (It's such a long time
since I've had to introduce anyone---my brood all came as an existing colony.)
Little new guy, by the way, is supposed to be people-friendly. I'm hoping
it will help bring my two round. 





Cherie, whodoes rescue---she's the
angel that took all the NJ cats--said she didn't think I needed to
keeplittle new guyseparate (like in a crate, the other option I
mentioned to her). But everythingI read in the past says I should
introduce them s-l-o-w-l-y. 











2. D'you think I should
remove the negative cat, Momcat, from the room because otherwise she could
contract FeLV from the new cat if it were a different strain of FeLV. (I'm very
hazy on this stuff but I think I recall Sally in San Jose talking about different
strains.)Momcat's never been vaccinated for FeLV. She's still
scared, and I really don't want to upset her further at this point. I dream of
integrating her woth my bunch one day. It will be awful trying to catch
her--much worse than the kittens and they were difficult enough.











All opinions much appreciated!! Thanks in
advanceKerry








=00IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE. Any advice expressed above as to tax matters was neither written nor intended by the sender or Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw LLP to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, then (i) the advice was written to support the promotion or marketing (by a person other than Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw LLP) of that transaction or matter, and (ii) such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayers particular circumstances from an independent tax advisorThis email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail. 

RE: new cat coming--advice needed

2005-09-19 Thread MacKenzie, Kerry N.
Title: Message



Thanks 
Hideyo. Yes, I agree---I have 2 who never got over being introduced too soon. I 
keep thinking I should try to re-introduce them. 
I want 
minimize the new little guy's fearas far as possible. He's been thru a lot 
already. Kerry
-Original Message-From: 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
On Behalf Of Hideyo YamamotoSent: Monday, September 19, 2005 
1:29 PMTo: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgSubject: RE: new cat 
coming--advice needed

I think you got all the 
key points! The magic word for introduction of new cat(s) is  do it 
verrry s-l-o-w-l-y for both ends  for existing kitties and new kitties 
 
We want to make sure 
that both sides has a place to get away if they are not comfortable with 
situation so that they are not stuck there  

Thats said, I would 
first put a new kitty in a separate room, and have her get used to you and the 
smell of your house first - then, you might want to slowly introduce to your 
kitties either through screen door between the rooms , and then, put a new kitty 
in the crate in the rest of the rooms while you are home.. etc.. once the 
damage is done, its very difficult to undo (speaking of my bitter experience) 
--- as long as you take it slow, everything should go well  


Older kitties are, 
slower you want to take

Kerry, I am sure that 
everything will work just fine! 

Hideyo





From: 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
On Behalf Of MacKenzie, Kerry 
N.Sent: Monday, September 19, 
2005 10:37 AMTo: 
felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgSubject: new cat coming--advice 
needed


Dear friends, I need 
some advice!



One of the NJ FeLV 
cats will be coming soon--possibly this Wed--to join my 2 remaining feral 
kitties (Mickie who's got FeLV, and Momcat who has tested neg 
twice).

Mickey and Momcat live 
in my 2nd bedroom.



I have 2 
Qs--



1. 
d'you think Ineed to introducethe new little guyslowly--I'd 
have to keephim in my bedroom while I'm at work, which could mean he'll be 
on his own for long stretches. :( (It's such a long 
time since I've had to introduce anyone---my brood all came as an existing 
colony.) Little new guy, by the way, is supposed to be people-friendly. 
I'm hoping it will help bring my two round. 

Cherie, whodoes 
rescue---she's the angel that took all the NJ cats--said she didn't think 
I needed to keeplittle new guyseparate (like in a crate, the other 
option I mentioned to her). But everythingI read in the past says I should 
introduce them s-l-o-w-l-y. 



2. 
D'you think I should remove the negative cat, Momcat, from the room because 
otherwise she could contract FeLV from the new cat if it were a different strain 
of FeLV. (I'm very hazy on this stuff but I think I recall Sally in San Jose talking about 
different strains.)Momcat's never been vaccinated for FeLV. She's 
still scared, and I really don't want to upset her further at this point. I 
dream of integrating her woth my bunch one day. It will be awful trying to catch 
her--much worse than the kittens and they were difficult 
enough.



All opinions much 
appreciated!! Thanks in 
advanceKerry=00

IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE. Any advice expressed above as to tax matters 
was neither written nor intended by the sender or Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw 
LLP to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding 
tax penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or 
refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a 
partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, 
then (i) the advice was written to support the promotion or marketing (by a 
person other than Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw LLP) of that transaction or 
matter, and (ii) such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayers 
particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor

This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the 
use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received 
this email in error please notify the system manager. If you are not the named 
addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail. 

=00IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE. Any advice expressed above as to tax matters was neither written nor intended by the sender or Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw LLP to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, then (i) the advice was written to support the promotion or marketing (by a person other than Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw LLP) of that transaction or matter, and (ii) such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayers particular circumstances from an independent tax advisorThis email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for the use of the in

Re: new cat coming--advice needed

2005-09-19 Thread Terri Brown
Title: Message




Sounds like you got all the main points from everyone already.

Terri in NJ

  - Original Message - 
  From: MacKenzie, Kerry N. 
  To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  
  Sent: Monday, September 19, 2005 12:36 
  PM
  Subject: new cat coming--advice 
  needed
  
  Dear friends, I need some 
  advice!
  
  One of the NJ FeLV cats will be coming 
  soon--possibly this Wed--to join my 2 remaining feral kitties (Mickie who's 
  got FeLV, and Momcat who has tested neg twice).
  Mickey and Momcat live in my 2nd 
  bedroom.
  
  I have 2 Qs--
  
  1. d'you think 
  Ineed to introducethe new little guyslowly--I'd have to 
  keephim in my bedroom while I'm at work, which could mean he'll be on 
  his own for long stretches. :( (It's such a long 
  time since I've had to introduce anyone---my brood all came as an existing 
  colony.) Little new guy, by the way, is supposed to be people-friendly. 
  I'm hoping it will help bring my two round. 
  Cherie, whodoes rescue---she's the 
  angel that took all the NJ cats--said she didn't think I needed to 
  keeplittle new guyseparate (like in a crate, the other option I 
  mentioned to her). But everythingI read in the past says I should 
  introduce them s-l-o-w-l-y. 
  
  2. D'you think I should 
  remove the negative cat, Momcat, from the room because otherwise she could 
  contract FeLV from the new cat if it were a different strain of FeLV. (I'm 
  very hazy on this stuff but I think I recall Sally in San Jose talking about 
  different strains.)Momcat's never been vaccinated for FeLV. She's 
  still scared, and I really don't want to upset her further at this point. I 
  dream of integrating her woth my bunch one day. It will be awful trying to 
  catch her--much worse than the kittens and they were difficult 
  enough.
  
  All opinions much appreciated!! Thanks in 
  advanceKerry
  =00 
  
  IRS CIRCULAR 230 NOTICE. Any advice expressed above as to tax matters 
  was neither written nor intended by the sender or Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw 
  LLP to be used and cannot be used by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding 
  tax penalties that may be imposed under U.S. tax law. If any person uses or 
  refers to any such tax advice in promoting, marketing or recommending a 
  partnership or other entity, investment plan or arrangement to any taxpayer, 
  then (i) the advice was written to support the promotion or marketing (by a 
  person other than Mayer, Brown, Rowe  Maw LLP) of that transaction or 
  matter, and (ii) such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayers 
  particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor
  
  This email and any files transmitted with it are intended solely for 
  the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have 
  received this email in error please notify the system manager. If you are not 
  the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this 
  e-mail. 


RE: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-08 Thread Karolyn Lount
I use Wooden Pellets that are made for stoves. I pay $4.19 for 40 lbs.
I just cover the bottom of the pan. By doing this you do not have the
weight of other litters. After they pee on it, it turns to silt




RE: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-07 Thread tamara stickler
I'm now buying my cat litter at the hardware store. I pick up a 40lb bag of wood stove pellets for $4.99...it doesn't mask odors quite as well has the pine pellets (Feline Pine,  Pet Smart's brand), but still better than all those perfumy cat litters. I can change it more often and still save $$$. Plus, the slightly larger pellets absorb better and last longer than the Feline Pine.Cherie A Gabbert [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:

You are right it is $10.00 for 21 lbs, and three of those I spend $30.00 a week in littler alone, not to mention other odor control items for my furr family.
Cherie"MacKenzie, Kerry N." [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


I think Cherie pays $10 for 21 (not 2) pounds!
The Costco deal sounds good. 
I'm pretty happy withmy Petsmart deal -- $10 for 40 lb Exquisicat litter and it's actually one of the best I've ever used, as good as Arm  Hammer which costs a lot more. (I don't have wheels, and Petsmart, 5 mins walkfrom myplace, openedlast year, thank goodness.)

-Original Message-From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of NinaSent: Friday, March 04, 2005 10:59 AMTo: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgSubject: Re: New cat litter will detect illness in catsCherie,$10 for 2lbs? There goes the budget! I buy Jonny Cat at Costco ($9 for 50lbs) and add baking soda (also bought in the jumbo economy size) and Feline Pine. The Jonny Cat is cheap enough that I don't have to conserve litter when cleaning the boxes and sprinkling baking soda and Feline Pine in work on the odor control. Cherie A Gabbert wrote: 

Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if it can be used all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now I pay $10.00 for 21lbs and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
CherieBarbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




there's a website for the litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you order two of anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping banner for more info). 
i might order it as have had problems in the past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10 -10, i've had no problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock on the kitty's head.(they all love him...go figure...)
barbara

- Original Message - 
From: tamara stickler 
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] ; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
Subject: OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

Here's something odd:

Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will detect urinary tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's called "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com for more info.


Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. This message contains confidential information and is intended only for the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail. 
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Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread Cherie A Gabbert
Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if it can be used all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now I pay $10.00 for 21lbs and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
CherieBarbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




there's a website for the litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you order two of anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping banner for more info). 
i might order it as have had problems in the past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10 -10, i've had no problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock on the kitty's head.(they all love him...go figure...)
barbara

- Original Message - 
From: tamara stickler 
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] ; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
Subject: OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

Here's something odd:

Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will detect urinary tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's called "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com for more info.


Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web 

Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread Nina




Cherie,
$10 for 2lbs? There goes the budget! I buy Jonny Cat at Costco ($9
for 50lbs) and add baking soda (also bought in the jumbo economy size)
and Feline Pine. The Jonny Cat is cheap enough that I don't have to
conserve litter when cleaning the boxes and sprinkling baking soda and
Feline Pine in work on the odor control. 

Cherie A Gabbert wrote:

  Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if it
can be used all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now I
pay $10.00 for 21lbs and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
  Cherie
  
  Barbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  


there's a website for the litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you order
two of anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping banner
for more info). 
i might order it as have had
problems in the past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10
-10, i've had no problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock
on the kitty's head.(they all love him...go figure...)
barbara

  -
Original Message - 
  From:
  tamara
stickler 
  To:
  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  
  Sent:
Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
  Subject:
OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats
  
  
  Here's something odd:
  
  Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will detect
urinary tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's called
"SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com
for more info.
  
  
  Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! 
  Yahoo!
Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web 
  





RE: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread MacKenzie, Kerry N.
Title: Message



I 
think Cherie pays $10 for 21 (not 2) pounds!
The 
Costco deal sounds good. 
I'm 
pretty happy withmy Petsmart deal -- $10 for 40 lb Exquisicat litter and 
it's actually one of the best I've ever used, as good as Arm  Hammer which 
costs a lot more. (I don't have wheels, and Petsmart, 5 mins walkfrom 
myplace, openedlast year, thank goodness.)

-Original Message-From: 
[EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
On Behalf Of NinaSent: Friday, March 04, 2005 10:59 
AMTo: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgSubject: Re: New cat 
litter will detect illness in catsCherie,$10 for 
2lbs? There goes the budget! I buy Jonny Cat at Costco ($9 for 
50lbs) and add baking soda (also bought in the jumbo economy size) and Feline 
Pine. The Jonny Cat is cheap enough that I don't have to conserve litter 
when cleaning the boxes and sprinkling baking soda and Feline Pine in work on 
the odor control. Cherie A Gabbert wrote: 

  Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if it can be used 
  all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now I pay $10.00 for 21lbs 
  and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
  CherieBarbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
  wrote:
  



there's a website for the litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you order two of 
anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping banner for more 
info). 
i might order it as have had problems in the 
past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10 -10, i've had no 
problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock on the kitty's 
head.(they all love him...go figure...)
barbara

  - 
  Original Message - 
  From: 
  tamara 
  stickler 
  To: 
  [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
  ; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  
  Sent: 
  Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
  Subject: 
  OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats
  
  Here's something odd:
  
  Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will detect urinary 
  tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's called 
  "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com for more 
  info.
  
  
  Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 
  Moments of the Web This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. This message contains confidential information and is intended only for the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail.


RE: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread Cherie A Gabbert
You are right it is $10.00 for 21 lbs, and three of those I spend $30.00 a week in littler alone, not to mention other odor control items for my furr family.
Cherie"MacKenzie, Kerry N." [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:


I think Cherie pays $10 for 21 (not 2) pounds!
The Costco deal sounds good. 
I'm pretty happy withmy Petsmart deal -- $10 for 40 lb Exquisicat litter and it's actually one of the best I've ever used, as good as Arm  Hammer which costs a lot more. (I don't have wheels, and Petsmart, 5 mins walkfrom myplace, openedlast year, thank goodness.)

-Original Message-From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of NinaSent: Friday, March 04, 2005 10:59 AMTo: felvtalk@felineleukemia.orgSubject: Re: New cat litter will detect illness in catsCherie,$10 for 2lbs? There goes the budget! I buy Jonny Cat at Costco ($9 for 50lbs) and add baking soda (also bought in the jumbo economy size) and Feline Pine. The Jonny Cat is cheap enough that I don't have to conserve litter when cleaning the boxes and sprinkling baking soda and Feline Pine in work on the odor control. Cherie A Gabbert wrote: 

Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if it can be used all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now I pay $10.00 for 21lbs and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
CherieBarbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




there's a website for the litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you order two of anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping banner for more info). 
i might order it as have had problems in the past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10 -10, i've had no problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock on the kitty's head.(they all love him...go figure...)
barbara

- Original Message - 
From: tamara stickler 
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] ; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
Subject: OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

Here's something odd:

Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will detect urinary tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's called "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com for more info.


Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. This message contains confidential information and is intended only for the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail. 

Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread Nina




I'm guessing that Arm and Hammer litter box deodorizer is more
expensive than their regular baking soda. They've got to pay for the
marketing and fancy packaging somehow, right? Try the regular baking
soda and see if it works as well. I too have three cats and I don't
have an odor problem. Well, at least not from the littler boxes!
Nina

Cherie A Gabbert wrote:

  Nina,
  Thanks I will try thatalso, with 7 cats and 3 jumbo boxes, I
scoop 3 times a day and change all of them on Saturday, with daily
sprinkeling of Arm and Hammer litter box deodorizer, get very
expensive. I use Tidy Cat with the crystals to reduce odor.
  Cherie
  
  Nina [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
  Cherie,
$10 for 2lbs? There goes the budget! I buy Jonny Cat at Costco ($9
for 50lbs) and add baking soda (also bought in the jumbo economy size)
and Feline Pine. The Jonny Cat is cheap enough that I don't have to
conserve litter when cleaning the boxes and sprinkling baking soda and
Feline Pine in work on the odor control. 

Cherie A Gabbert wrote:

  Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if
it can be used all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now
I pay $10.00 for 21lbs and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
  Cherie
  
  Barbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:
  


there's a website for the
litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you
order two of anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping
banner for more info). 
i might order it as have had
problems in the past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10
-10, i've had no problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock
on the kitty's head.(they all love him...go figure...)
barbara

  -
Original Message - 
  From:
  tamara stickler 
  To:
  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
  
  Sent:
Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
  Subject:
OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats
  
  
  Here's something odd:
  
  Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will
detect urinary tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's
called "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com
for more info.
  
Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! 
  Yahoo!
Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web 
  

  





Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread Nina




I just read my email, I have 7 cats, not 3. Where did that come from?
Nina

Nina wrote:

  
  
I'm guessing that Arm and Hammer litter box deodorizer is more
expensive than their regular baking soda. They've got to pay for the
marketing and fancy packaging somehow, right? Try the regular baking
soda and see if it works as well. I too have three cats and I don't
have an odor problem. Well, at least not from the littler boxes!
Nina
  
Cherie A Gabbert wrote:
  
Nina,
Thanks I will try thatalso, with 7 cats and 3 jumbo boxes, I
scoop 3 times a day and change all of them on Saturday, with daily
sprinkeling of Arm and Hammer litter box deodorizer, get very
expensive. I use Tidy Cat with the crystals to reduce odor.
Cherie

Nina [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:
Cherie,
$10 for 2lbs? There goes the budget! I buy Jonny Cat at Costco ($9
for 50lbs) and add baking soda (also bought in the jumbo economy size)
and Feline Pine. The Jonny Cat is cheap enough that I don't have to
conserve litter when cleaning the boxes and sprinkling baking soda and
Feline Pine in work on the odor control. 
  
Cherie A Gabbert wrote:
  
Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if
it can be used all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now
I pay $10.00 for 21lbs and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
Cherie

Barbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED]
wrote:

  
  
  there's a website for the
litter
  http://www.scooplite.com/
  35 lbs for 14.95 and if you
order two of anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping
banner for more info). 
  i might order it as have had
problems in the past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10
-10, i've had no problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock
on the kitty's head.(they all love him...go figure...)
  barbara
  
-
Original Message - 
From:
tamara stickler 
To:
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org

Sent:
Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
Subject:
OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats


Here's something odd:

Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will
detect urinary tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's
called "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com
for more info.
Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! 
Yahoo!
Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web 

  

  





Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread Cherie A Gabbert
Sometimes what we are thinking does not quite make it to our fingers in time. lol

Nina [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
I just read my email, I have 7 cats, not 3. Where did that come from?NinaNina wrote:
I'm guessing that Arm and Hammer litter box deodorizer is more expensive than their regular baking soda. They've got to pay for the marketing and fancy packaging somehow, right? Try the regular baking soda and see if it works as well. I too have three cats and I don't have an odor problem. Well, at least not from the littler boxes!NinaCherie A Gabbert wrote:

Nina,
Thanks I will try thatalso, with 7 cats and 3 jumbo boxes, I scoop 3 times a day and change all of them on Saturday, with daily sprinkeling of Arm and Hammer litter box deodorizer, get very expensive. I use Tidy Cat with the crystals to reduce odor.
CherieNina [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
Cherie,$10 for 2lbs? There goes the budget! I buy Jonny Cat at Costco ($9 for 50lbs) and add baking soda (also bought in the jumbo economy size) and Feline Pine. The Jonny Cat is cheap enough that I don't have to conserve litter when cleaning the boxes and sprinkling baking soda and Feline Pine in work on the odor control. Cherie A Gabbert wrote: 

Can you let me know what you think of it? I am not sure if it can be used all the time, and if it has odor control? but right now I pay $10.00 for 21lbs and I use 3 of those a week...it all adds up
CherieBarbara Lowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:




there's a website for the litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you order two of anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping banner for more info). 
i might order it as have had problems in the past but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10 -10, i've had no problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock on the kitty's head.(they all love him...go figure...)
barbara

- Original Message - 
From: tamara stickler 
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] ; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 PM
Subject: OT: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

Here's something odd:

Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will detect urinary tract infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's called "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com for more info.

Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web 

Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread TenHouseCats
see what happens when you let your cats have keys to the front door?
they let all their friends in! hee hee counting to see if any new
ones have appeared in my household lately

MC



RE: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread MacKenzie, Kerry N.
I was trying to think of a suitable quip to Nina's multiplying
cats--love it, MC!

-Original Message-
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
[mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On Behalf Of TenHouseCats
Sent: Friday, March 04, 2005 12:02 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats


see what happens when you let your cats have keys to the front door?
they let all their friends in! hee hee counting to see if any new
ones have appeared in my household lately

MC

This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended 
solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If 
you have received this email in error please notify the system manager. This 
message contains confidential information and is intended only for the 
individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not 
disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail.



Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-04 Thread Cherie A Gabbert
just like bunnies, they always seem to keep multiplying ;-)) lolTenHouseCats [EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
see what happens when you let your cats have keys to the front door?they let all their friends in! hee hee counting to see if any newones have appeared in my household latelyMC

Re: New cat litter will detect illness in cats

2005-03-03 Thread Barbara Lowe



there's a website for the litter
http://www.scooplite.com/
35 lbs for 14.95 and if you order two of 
anything,it's free shipping(click on the free shipping banner for more info). 

i might order it as have had problems in the past 
but since i put them all on vit C and E and coq10 -10, i've had no 
problems--knock on wood or as my husband says, knock on the kitty's head.(they 
all love him...go figure...)
barbara

  - Original Message - 
  From: 
  tamara 
  stickler 
  To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
  ; felvtalk@felineleukemia.org 
  
  Sent: Thursday, March 03, 2005 1:50 
  PM
  Subject: OT: New cat litter will detect 
  illness in cats
  
  Here's something odd:
  
  Pet Ecology is to release a new cat litter that will detect urinary tract 
  infections, diabetes and pregnancy in cats. It's called 
  "SCOOP-lite". www.petecology.com 
  for more info.
  
  
  Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 
  Moments of the Web