Re: Templating Solutions

2001-06-18 Thread Steve Mynott

Greg McCarroll [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

   Template Toolkit
   HTML::Mason
   Text::Template 
   HTML::Template
   HTML::Embperl

Also Apache::ASP 

searching for template on CPAN also gets quite a lot of hits...

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness.  -- mark twain 



Re: CMS frameworks

2001-06-16 Thread Steve Mynott

Dave Hodgkinson [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Any other offers?

http://scoop.kuro5hin.org/

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

bom shankar



Re: Sony Clie (was: Re: Social meet)

2001-06-08 Thread Steve Mynott

Robin Szemeti [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Thu, 07 Jun 2001, Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
   their Memory Stick is a closed book.
  
  Fine with me. Then maybe we'll get decent short range wireless data
  exchange with good authentication and encryption.
 
 and the problem with Lucent Orinoco ( + RC128 )  is?

its totally insecure 

Although most 802.11 equipment is designed to disregard encrypted
content for which it does not have the key, we have been able to
successfully intercept WEP-encrypted transmissions by changing the
configuration of the drivers.

http://www.isaac.cs.berkeley.edu/isaac/wep-faq.html

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

if you were inclined to lose your mind, you could stay on the internet
all day.



Re: Enough!

2001-05-16 Thread Steve Mynott

David Cantrell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 08:59:32PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
  On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 05:43:52PM +0100, David Cantrell wrote:
   
nokia 9210
   
   Which is still, AFAIK, unobtainium.
  
  I know someone who knows someone who has a test model - I'll prod on
  programmability.
 
 Greg has (had?) one to play with.  It is programmable.

The organiser bit I am sure is programmable but I was just wondering
to what degree the phone part itself is accessible, eg. can you read
the sort of phone information visible from the Nokia Net Monitor like
the TIMSI etc.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

if you understand what you're doing, you're not learning anything.
-- a. l.



Re: Caller ID (was Re: Enough!)

2001-05-16 Thread Steve Mynott

Jonathan Peterson [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 I'm sure I remember reading somewhere that you always send your CID when 
 you make a phone call. If you choose to withhold the ID, it still gets 
 sent, it just gets sent with a 'do not disclose' flag set, which all (BT 
 approved) phones and services (like 1471) must honour. Therefore it should 
 be easy for BT themselves to offer something that can bar CID witheld 
 calls.
 
 But this might be wrong, or might just be how the US system works or 
 something.

This is basically right but some ways of making a call don't send any
CLI at all and the US and UK systems are different.

The BT specs are online:-

http://www1.btwebworld.com/sinet/227v3p1.pdf

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]
the difference between a moral man and a man of honor is that the latter
regrets a discreditable act, even when it has worked and he has not
been caught.  -- henry l. mencken



Re: Caller ID (was Re: Enough!)

2001-05-16 Thread Steve Mynott

Matthew Byng-Maddick [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Wed, 16 May 2001, Dominic Mitchell wrote:
  On Wed, May 16, 2001 at 10:59:07AM +0100, Robin Szemeti wrote:
   I do keep intending to do something cute with my ISDN adapter and log the
   stuff coming out of the D channel and see whats in there ... but time has
   prevented it etc.
  I'd be interested to hear how you get on... I was under the impression
  that the D channel was an always on 16k-thing.  It'd be interesting to
  see what gets sent down there normally...
 
 CLI / Destination number that kind of thing. Signalling information
 basically.

I have heard of people using the D channel signalling to communicate
for free.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

liberty is always dangerous, but it is the safest thing we have.
-- harry emerson fosdick



Re: Enough!

2001-05-15 Thread Steve Mynott

Greg McCarroll [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 * Simon Cozens ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 12:15:32PM +0100, Martin Ling wrote:
   On Tue, May 15, 2001 at 12:04:24PM +0100, James Powell wrote:
Heh, don't forget to have a RBL-like list of source telephone numbers.
   Definitely. A whitelist too, of course.
  
  Now *this* is why I want programmable mobile phones.
 
 nokia 9210

But is it actually programmable by the end user?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  /\
  \ /
   x  ascii ribbon campaign against html e-mail 
  / \



UK programmers left-wing? was Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Dave Cross [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Take a look around you. This list, being representative of the Perl 
 community, tends towards the intelligent end of the spectrum. And from what 
 I've gathered from the conversations I've had with people here, the vast 
 majority of us tend towards the left[1].

I think you are being UK-centric here and falling for the old
programmer myth that since its possible to program computers it is
also possible to engineer people and the economy, although the
experience of the last twenty years would suggest otherwise.

Libertarianism seems more popular than socialism on the internet as as
a whole, at least, with many American programmers.

It's my distinct (and probably biased opinion) that the popularity of
UK socialism has in long term decline since at least the late 70s and
early 80s.

There are certainly far fewer left-wing bookshops now than twenty
years ago.  Most of the young seem now more interested in single
issues like animal rights, globalisation etc then traditional
socialism.

Blair will probably be elected next month of a platform which at least
in some ways resembles Thatcherism more than traditional socialism.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

as far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain;
as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality. --albert einstein



chocolate was Re: Monitors

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Simon Wistow [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Me neither. I came to the startling conclusion about 5 years ago that I
 don't really like. I don't hate it, just don't particularly enjoy it
 except in odd moods and even then mostly dark chocolate.

I don't like English chocolate which doesn't in fact contain very much
chocolate at all if you study the percentage cocoa solids.

Most English milk chocolate resembles dark wax and tastes like
cooking chocolate, although Galaxy is just about acceptable.

Didn't the EU try and prevent English chocolate being called
chocolate?

 I managed to have a day trip to Geneva on Friday and didn't buy any at
 all.

European chocolate is a lot nicer.

BTW a very simple way of making drinking chocolate is to to combine
equal qualities of cocoa powder and honey before adding hot water and
milk.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]


radioactivity/is in the air for you and me



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Matthew Jones [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 It also irtritates me when the oil companies hike fuel prices and the dump
 the pump lobby respond by suggesting that the government drop tax. Why
 don't they ever have a go at BP or Shell?

Because the vast majority of the petrol pump price (something like
70-80%) is tax.

UK has the _cheapest_ petrol in Europe before tax and the _most_
expensive afterwards.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.
-- philip k. dick



Re: More politics (was Re: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Matthew Jones [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 medicine and so on. Has anybody worked out how much it would cost to buy the
 same services as a private citizen compared to the cost that the state
 charges in tax?

People have tried to do this and the figures I saw suggest the private
sector can supply, on average, any service at half the price of the
public.

Of course I am sure it isn't difficult to get the figures to say other
things as well.
 
 Also, how is a privately-run service more efficient if you have shareholders
 creaming money off the top. Enlighten me.

Because it's easier to get rid of them and get someone else to supply
the service if they are crap.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]


abandon the search for truth; settle for a good fantasy.



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Matthew Jones [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

   the pump lobby respond by suggesting that the government 
  drop tax. Why don't they ever have a go at BP or Shell?
  
  You don't elect BP or Shell.
 
 Well, precisely, they're companies, so you boycott them. Which is what I
 thought that dump the pump was originally about; boycotting oil companies in
 prrotest at their big markups (apparently). Somewhere along the way it
 seemed (to me) to be hijacked by a large chunk of the countryside alliance.

Well one advantage of BP or Shell is if you don't like either company
then you can simply choose not to purchase their products.

Unfortunately you can't opt out of a government you don't like in
the same way.

The American media recognised what happened as a tax revolt.  People
aren't stupid they know the high petrol prices are the fault of UK
taxation rather than BP or Shell.

We have high petrol prices, high alchohol prices and high cigarette
prices due to the greed of the current UK government (following in the
footsteps of the Tories before).

This is not to say BP or Shell don't try and make as money as
possible.

Sure they do this is how the market works.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]
the basic fact about human existence is not that it is a tragedy,
but that it is a bore.  it is not so much a war as an endless standing
in line.  -- h. l. mencken



Re: chocolate was Re: Monitors

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Lucy McWilliam [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On 14 May 2001, Steve Mynott wrote:
 
  I don't like English chocolate which doesn't in fact contain very much
  chocolate at all if you study the percentage cocoa solids.
 
 Better than American chcolate.

I have bought US Hersey (sp?) bars in the UK and thought they were
better than the average bar of Cadbury's Dairy Milk.

YMMV

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

the question is not if we should be paranoid, the question is if
we're paranoid enough



Re: UK programmers left-wing? was Re: BOFHs requiring license

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Matthew Jones [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

  (trolllhave you ever
  noticed how left wingers tend to be less tolerant to the fact 
  that their views may be wrong than right wing people?/troll)
 
 Ah, that's because we left-wingers *are* right, and also because secretly,
 silently, you right-wingers know it, too. :P

It's more likely the right-wingers (not that I really like that
term) have had phases of being left-wingers in the past and know _all_
about it.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

mary had a little key - she kept it in escrow, and every thing that
mary said, the feds were sure to know.  -- sam simpson



Re: Enough!

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Dave Hodgkinson [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Please, would you take the politics elsewhere? Some of us really don't
 give a shit either way.

Dave (the other one) told us to!

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

a classic is something that everybody wants to have read and nobody
wants to read.  -- mark twain



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

David Cantrell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Mon, May 14, 2001 at 12:11:13PM +, Steve Mynott wrote:
 
  Well one advantage of BP or Shell is if you don't like either company
  then you can simply choose not to purchase their products.
 
 So how, pray, do I opt out of the international oil companies' cartel?

Private companies often try and fix prices and limit competition but
this rarely works since usually one of the cartel members breaks the
agreement in order to make more money.

Thus OPEC agreements usually break down like they did last month when
they produced 700,000 barrels per day more than they had agreed.

http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?siteid=mktwdist=mktwmoreguid=%7B13984F78-CFC1-4F9A-A3BC-28A8E2FE2F53%7D

My original point also stands which is there is a basic distinction
between a state which forces people to do things like pay tax and a
company (no matter how large or nasty) which can't (even although it
still may supply a widely used product).

And of course if a company runs or has direct influence on a state and
laws are passed to favour it then we aren't talking about the market
anymore but state power.

It's a basic failing of socialism to believe that what they term
economic power (selling things) is more of an evil than political
power (putting people in prison or taking money from them).

They naively believe force (jails, guns, theft etc) can be used
responsibly to combat people's free choices of buying and selling
things, which for some strange reason they think is wrong.

Even if their ends were right their means are based on violence and
ultimately self-defeating.

  When leading by the way of the Tao, abominate the use of force, for
  it causes resistance, and loss of strength, showing the Tao has
  not been followed well.  Achieve results but not through
  violence, for it is against the natural way, and damages both
  others' and one's own true self.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

no man or group of men shall aggress upon the person or property of anyone
else.  -- murray n. rothbard



Re: Enough!

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Jonathan Stowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On 14 May 2001, Dave Hodgkinson wrote:
 
 
  Please, would you take the politics elsewhere? Some of us really don't
  give a shit either way.
 
 
 I did warn them but they appeared to ignore me ...

Can't you just kill on politics subject? 

(I will try and use the subject header in my posts anyway so people
can)

Personally I find discussion of politics more interesting than
American TV shows about vampires.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

work like you don't need the money dance like nobody's watching love
like you've never been hurt.



Re: Politics (was RE: BOFHs requiring license)

2001-05-14 Thread Steve Mynott

Tony Bowden [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 With a sponge and a rusty spanner?

she said: Eh, I know you, and you cannot sing.
I said: that's nothing--you should hear me play piano.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

there are some politicians who, if their constituents were cannibals,
would promise them missionaries for dinner. -- h.l. mencken



Re: Schroedingers Computer

2001-05-11 Thread Steve Mynott

Barbie [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 http://www.nature.com/nsu/010503/010503-6.html
 
 So far, demonstrations of quantum computing have been limited to the most
 rudimentary of calculations, involving only two or three bits of
 information. 
 
 I'm sure Damian could them straight on that one ;-P

And there was a demonstration of a 7 qubit computer last year!

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

i gained nothing at all from supreme enlightenment, and for that very
reason it is called supreme enlightenment.  -- gotama buddha



Re: Company Name

2001-04-25 Thread Steve Mynott

Robert Shiels [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Nice summary. I was going to go for Shiels, but there is some plastics
 company in Lancs that have it already. I thought of Shiels IT Services,
 but one potential acronym of this is not very pleasing :-)

What about Shielsa or Shielsia?

(OK they sound crap but then it's the fashion)

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

sometimes one pays most for the things one gets for nothing. -- albert
einstein



BBC was Re: Beginners Guide

2001-04-19 Thread Steve Mynott


Neil Ford [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Don't be suprised if by then the abolishment of the licence fee hasn't been
 announced and that the BBC hasn't announced subscription charges for it's
 services. Better that than the Beeb starts carrying ads.

Politically the BBC has been lucky with its licence fee.  There was
some discussion about abolishing it in the early 1980s under Thatcher
but its been off the political agenda since then.  The election of
Labour must have been a relief for them.

As for the "Beeb" carrying ads, well it has done this for several
years on its web site which was setup with ICL

http://www.beeb.net/

(this is the "Beeb" in the sense of "beeb Ventures Ltd", a subsidiary
of BBC Worldwide, the commercial arm of the BBC.)  Of course few
outside the corporation itself realise that "Beeb" is actually the
brandname of a profit making company with online shopping.

The BBC proper of course actually carries adverts on television for
its own commercial products like "Radio Times" and even political
adverts supporting the way its financed ("its the unique way .. blah
blah").  

But it doesn't carry adverts for anyone else.
 
 The BBC are definitely working towards the licence fee being withdrawn at some
 point by some government (hence all the curfuffle over ads on bbc.com), so
 alternative forms of financing will need to be sort.

The BBC is pragmatic enough to realise that long-term the licence fee
will probably go.

It's the how and when that are interesting!

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

mary had a little key - she kept it in escrow, and every thing that
mary said, the feds were sure to know.  -- sam simpson



Re: next social meeting vs tube strike

2001-04-19 Thread Steve Mynott

Struan Donald [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Noticed on my way past the news stands last night that the next tube
 strike is pencilled in for May the 3rd, as is the next social
 meeting.  OK, so the strike might not happen but if it does is this 
 not going to make the next social meeting a bit problematic?

why don't you have the social meeting a day earlier so that everyone
can "work from home" with their hangovers the following day?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

love is the triumph of imagination over intelligence.  -- h. l. mencken



Re: Grammar (was: Re: Linux.com Online Chat)

2001-04-05 Thread Steve Mynott

dcross - David Cross [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 When I was at secondary school (75 - 79) ITA was used to teach reading to a
 remedial class. As (supposedly) one of the brighter pupils in my year, I got
 to spend a couple of hours a week helping out in this class, which is where
 I picked up ITA.

I was taught ITA in the early 1970s and remember hating it.  There
were actually more letters than in the normal alphabet.

My spelling is pretty poor as well!

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

it is better to be hated for what one is than be loved for what  one is not.
-andre gide



Re: Grammar (was: Re: Linux.com Online Chat)

2001-04-05 Thread Steve Mynott

Matthew Jones [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Right, well there's the difference then. I'm 29 this year and I was schooled
 during the seventies. Was anyone else of a similar age *not* taught proper
 punctuation and grammar at school? Back in those days, teachers actually
 taught you, as opposed to writing long essays to justify performance-related
 bonuses, or running around like headless chickens to prepare for OFSTED
 visits.

Me!

I am 35 this year and was never taught grammer at all, although I was
probably taught in quite a "progressive" manner for the time.  In
hindsight it was probably quite bad as well.

I remember arguing with a teacher who told us gravity was caused by
the Earth spinning round who refused to accept that the child she was
teaching actually knew more about it than her.

The only grammer I was taught at school was when I did foreign
languages much later.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

i believe that it is better to tell the truth than a lie. i believe
it is better to be free than to be a slave. and i believe it is better
to know than to be ignorant.  -- h. l. mencken



Re: Wavelan

2001-04-03 Thread Steve Mynott

Robin Szemeti [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 yes .. I'd heard Airport was good ..  can you still configuer it if you
 don't have an apple to talk to it with? indeed is there any configuration
 to do .. or is it jusrt a plain ethernet bridge?

It does NAT by default and basically works without configuration
(which was just as well since I didn't have either a windows or macos
box to use).

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

grief can take care of itself, but to get the full value of joy you must
 have somebody to divide it with.  -- mark twain



Re: Dedrat 7.0 and PGP

2001-03-17 Thread Steve Mynott

Robin Szemeti [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 OK .. I'm getting desperate now :)
 
 Anyone out there running Redhat 7.0?
 
 managed to build PGP from source on it? ...  or if not found a binary of
 PGP that works with PGP::Sign ?? . .poxy things giving me grief .. 
 of course it builds fine on 6.2.

which version of PGP?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

liberty is always dangerous, but it is the safest thing we have.
-- harry emerson fosdick



Re: GnuPG::Interface CGI

2001-02-22 Thread Steve Mynott

James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 
 ps - these t-shirt suggestions are reminding me of harry enfield
  loadsamoney "shut your mouth and look at my wad" 80s shirts!

What about "Larry says Relax"?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

"the right to be heard does not include the right to be taken
seriously."--hubert humphrey



Re: Fwd: MacWorld Tokyo Keynote Report

2001-02-22 Thread Steve Mynott

James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 G4 "tit" Powerbook?
 
 [insert joke]

It's the Thinkpads with the nipples...

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and i'm
not sure about the former. --albert einstein



Re: Alternative to bad perl resources

2001-02-19 Thread Steve Mynott

Tony Bowden [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Surely part of the reason that so much bad code gains so much popularity
 is that bad coders tend to think their code is good, so don't mind
 publicising it and shouting about it lots. Good coders, on the other hand,
 think that their code is always bad, so are reluctant to do much with it.
 But their "bad" is usually much better than others "good" ...

This is very true.

Also code beauty is in the eye of the beholder and is subjective.  

Also badly written code can be "good" in the sense of being useful.

We, as programmers, mean internal design when we say "good" whereas
users refer to software as "good" because it has a simple UI, is
useful and solves some problems without creating many new ones.

Of course good internal design probably tends to correspond to a
certain extent to good software, since it should be easier to extend
when new features are required and should be less buggy.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

the surest protection against temptation is cowardice.
-- mark twain



Re: London.pm List Weekly Summary 2001-02-12

2001-02-16 Thread Steve Mynott

[EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 For someone who's never used IRC at all, it's particularly annoying. I'm no
 Luddite though, I was using Cheeseplant's house over a decade ago, and wrote
 my own chat system, but just never got round to IRC.

I was on Cheeseplant's House as well!

I recently noticed the source was out

http://www.cheeseplant.org/~daniel/pages/cph.html

which chat system did you write?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]


enosig: this signature file is empty.



Re: Penderel Configuration

2001-02-15 Thread Steve Mynott

Jonathan Stowe [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Thu, 15 Feb 2001, Robert Shiels wrote:
 
  I'd like to know which perl modules are already installed.
 
 
 I think Meestah Cross has written something that does this, as have I and
 I think that Tom Phoenix has released Inside now which is a properly
 implemented way of doing same (I beta tested it for him and it worked
 then).

surely just

$ perldoc perllocal

?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

there are several good protections against temptation, but the surest is
 cowardice.  -- mark twain



Re: Technical Meeting Sponsorship

2001-02-06 Thread Steve Mynott

Robin Houston [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Tue, Feb 06, 2001 at 07:29:53AM -0500, Dave Cross wrote:
  I've been investigating places to hold Damian's meeting and I've already
  got some interesting leads (the Conway Hall looks like it might well
  work out!)
 
 Conway Hall would be a great venue, for the name alone!
 
 It can't be too expensive, because it's used by any number of
 fringe anarcho groups, who presumably don't have too much cash
 spilling around.

It would also be quite an interesting venue with a lot of character
and Holborn is easy to get to (central and north of the river).

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

same thing day after day - tube - work - diner - work - ...tube - armchair - tub



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Steve Mynott


This is really sysadminy stuff and probably off topic but here I go:-

Michael Stevens [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Isn't kickstart a solaris thing, or have redhat developed new stuff
 I didn't know about?

Kickstart is RedHat

http://wwwcache.ja.net/dev/kickstart/KickStart-HOWTO.html

Jumpstart is Solaris
 
Both are automated install procedures.

 If it is just a solaris thing, I was holding up solaris boxes as being
 GOOD because they don't come with much stuff installed. For servers,
 I see this as a desirable feature.

Whatever system I use (linux or solaris) I find they come with far too
much stuff installed.  Solaris is a bad offender as well with Thai X
Windows fonts and that CDE junk as well.  No I don't want power
management or true-type fonts on a server thank you Mr Joy.

Any system, irrespective of OS or distribution, I tend to totally
strip down out of all junk.  Binary package managers [1] tend to help a
lot with this (yes RPM can be good especially the -e flag). 

This is what the Hells Angels did with their Harleys, strip them
("chop") down the bare essentials before starting work.

I then customise them by installing all the real GNU programs (and
checking all the configuration options before building) you need like
emacs, rcs, gcc, perl etc (and the DJB stuff) under /usr/local and
killing that evil inetd program (a nice simple way of securing your
system).

If you follow this then you should be able to make a useable UNIX
system from any system (maybe even SCO if you were that insane).

[1] My main gripe with *BSD is lack of binary package management

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

if we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research,
would it?  - albert einstein



government overthowing Re: List Archive ( was SUBSCRIBE london-list archive@jab.org (fwd))

2001-01-26 Thread Steve Mynott

James Powell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Phew, just missed my 29th Sept post where I detailed my plans for
 a perl script to overthrow the government.

I actually think this would be possible if you ported either

http://anoncvs.aldigital.co.uk/lucre/

or 

http://www.unicorn.com/pgp/mm-readme.html

And, this is the hard bit, got everyone to use them...

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]
one page principle:
a specification that will not fit on one page of 8.5x11 inch
paper cannot be understood.
-- mark ardis



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Steve Mynott

Rob Partington [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 That installed a precompiled binary of dia for me. Or do you mean that,
 say, pkg_* don't have the same functionality as RPM?

It has the same (or similar functionality) but its database isn't
complete because it doesn't include _every_ system file.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

i didn't have time to write a short letter, so i wrote a long one instead.
  -- mark twain



Re: Sun's Perl was Re: Application servers and e-commerce platforms

2001-01-26 Thread Steve Mynott

Rob Partington [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 In message [EMAIL PROTECTED],
 Steve Mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
  On RedHat I can do something like 'rpm -e sendmail' to clean up before
  installing qmail and, alas, I can't do this on OpenBSD (although there
  has been talk of extending the binary packages to include the base
  OS).
 
 If you install the postfix package, you get a script which switches your
 system mailer between postfix and sendmail.  Much nicer than "rpm -e",
 because if you then don't get on with postfix, just run postfix-disable
 and you get sendmail back.

I don't want to have to install another MTA in order to remove the
existing one, what if I don't want one installed at all?

I would rather have a single line command able to remove any arbitary
package of system files (like the supplied Perl to replace by your
own?) than what you describe, which isn't a general solution to this
problem but rather a feature of one program.

IMO a proper binary package manager is still nicer because it also
allows you to easily list and verify each file in the bundle against a
checksum database.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

i installed two way mirrors in his pad in brentwood. and he'd come to
the door in a dress.



Re: Consultancy company

2001-01-22 Thread Steve Mynott

Robin Szemeti [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 On Mon, 22 Jan 2001, you wrote:
 
  Inded. Look at XP. The whole idea is that at the end of every day /
  week you have changed something and can show it to the client
  again. This way the client really understands what he really wants.
 
 wow ... "a client that understands what they want"  ... Mr Brocard,
 for gods sake WALK to the meeting, DO NOT drive. I have no idea what
 you're taking but I want some .. do you get to see little blue spacemen
 too ;))

Further to this most clients aren't even interested in understanding
what they want (that's _your_ job).

They just _want_ it.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

imagination is more important than knowledge. -- albert einstein



Re: Consultancy company

2001-01-22 Thread Steve Mynott

Simon Wistow [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 I sometimes feel guilty because 90% of my work gets done in 10% of my
 time. 

There is in fact Pareto's Law which says that 80% of results come from
20% of work (or 10-90 or whatever the numbers don't really matter).

No need to feel guilty since this is the way things are.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.
-- philip k. dick



Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-18 Thread Steve Mynott

"Paul Makepeace" [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 From: "Robin Houston" [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  Aww c'mon! RedHat was obviously targeted because it's the most
  widely used! None of the vulnerable software was written by RH
  (and all of it was also included in other distros).
 
 That's true -- but how easy is RH to upgrade/patch? And why is RH7 shipping
 with all these services turned on? (NFS? rpc.*? Hello?) Perhaps *that's* why
 it's a steaming pile of crap getting hacked the whole time.

RH is incredibly easy to upgrade with RPM one liners.  There is a
single web page of current security issues if people bothered to read
it they wouldn't get hacked.

RH7 ships with so many services turned on because Redhat marketing
think offering more services by default is popular with customers.
Longer feature list equal better in this world.

Don't blame the distribution (they are all equivalent anyway) blame
the lack of decent sysadmins.

RH/Slackware/Debian/Solaris/FreeBSD/NetBSD/OpenBSD are all fine
systems but they need to be setup by someone who knows what they are
doing in the same way that Perl has to be written by clueful
programmers.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

hey, if you can't remember when you booted it, it ain't windoze.



Re: apologies

2001-01-18 Thread Steve Mynott

dcross - David Cross [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 From: Dave Hodgkinson [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Sent: 18 January 2001 11:05
  
  I have Deep Purple at the Montreux jazz festival 2000... ;-)
 
 That all sounds a bit Spinal Tap.
 
 "We hope you like our new direction" :)

Didn't they appear at the Albert Hall with a orchestra in 1970?  Their
early exposure to classical music didn't impro^H^H^H^H^H change their
direction much.

BTW if anyone has the "On the Wings of a Russian Foxbat" 1977 bootleg
on MP3 with the better guitarist than their usual one can they email
it since Messrs Napster and Gnutella have failed me on this one?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

why shouldn't truth be stranger than fiction?  fiction, after all,
has to make sense.  -- mark twain 



Re: [Job] BOFH wanted was: Re: Red Hat worm discovered

2001-01-18 Thread Steve Mynott

Greg McCarroll [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 * Aaron Trevena ([EMAIL PROTECTED]) wrote:
  
  Also many hackers have more business sense than their MDs - look at
  success of projects started by hackers or engineers versus that of those
  started by MBAs or middle managers..
  
 
 business sense != project sucess

why not?  I would have thought similar skills were involved in both?

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

brook's law:
adding manpower to a late software project makes it later



Re: Feelers for London Open Source Convention

2001-01-17 Thread Steve Mynott

Nathan Torkington [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 As I said, though, we're REALLY worried about Europeans being on
 vacation and unable to attend.  We don't know much about the
 mysterious habits of this strange and noble race, and would appreciate
 your guesses as to their actions: will our attendance be buggered[1]

I don't know if you are asking the right people here.  I think the
actions of most Europeans are as much a mystery to those in the UK as
the US.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

the demagogue is one who preaches doctrines he knows to be untrue to men
he knows to be idiots.  -- h. l. mencken



Re: Feelers for London Open Source Convention

2001-01-17 Thread Steve Mynott

Dave Cross [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 At Wed, 17 Jan 2001 14:15:01 + (GMT), Kieran Barry [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
wrote:
 
  I thought Joe Dolce was only number 1 for a week or so, to be knocked
  off the top by Jealous Guy from Roxy Music. And poor old Vienna hung
  about at number 2 for yonks.
 
 Hmm... you may be right. Anyone know a site that lists UK top tens
 for the 1980s?

I don't but there is a excellent book called something like the
"Guiness Book of Hit Singles".

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

i have great faith in fools -- self confidence my friends call it.
-- edgar allan poe



Re: Mailman in Perl (Re: the list is dead, long live the list)

2001-01-14 Thread Steve Mynott

David Cantrell [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Yeah, I know, but then I compile plenty of stuff from scratch rather than
 rely on RPMs.  The real reason I haven't switched is because it's really

The drawback with 'make install' from source is that it doesn't write a
database of files owned by that source package which is the great
advantage of binary packages.  So you can't use do 'make uninstall' to
cleanly remove the program if you don't like or use it.  This is
basically what the *BSD ports system does.

It should be possible to write some wrapper for GNU configure to add a
'make uninstall' to the Makefile.  In the absence of this I usually
type 'script' to log whats installed at the 'make install' stage..

 *nasty* trying to switch from one distro to another without a) losing
 valuable config data and b) ending up with a ton of unused junk on the disk

The way to handle UNIX configuration files is like software and use
RCS.  On every system you can then type one command 'locate ,v' to see
all your local changes.  You can then systematically port config
changes to the new distribution.

 which is nigh-on impossible to tell apart from stuff that's in use.

It's a one liner to display files that haven't been used in the last
three months using 'find -atime'.  Other advantage of binary package
managers is you can then go ahead and delete large chunks of your OS
that you never use and it should warn you if it breaks other stuff.

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

if we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research,
would it?  - albert einstein



Re: the list is dead, long live the list

2001-01-12 Thread Steve Mynott


Some people like "bernsteinisms"!

;-)

"Paul Makepeace" [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 From: "David Cantrell" [EMAIL PROTECTED]
  Exactly.  I just can't handle bernsteinisms when there are good
 alternatives
  available - exim (easy), postfix (secure), mailman.  I can only put up with
  his oddities when the alternative is worse.  djbdns vs bind.
 
 Totally agreed. FWIW, exim + mailman is a slick, effective solution.
 
 # apt-get install mailman
 
 and implementing http://www.exim.org/howto/mailman.html
 
 Paul

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

i'm gonna climb on the mountains of the moon
and find the distant man waving his spoon



Re: Mailman in Perl (Re: the list is dead, long live the list)

2001-01-12 Thread Steve Mynott

Greg McCarroll [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 finally is it enough to simply tar.gz /usr/local/Rope and tag it
 with the architecture details

No you would want to build packages (.deb, .rpm and BSD and Solaris
packages) of rope for a "binary" type install as well as supplying a
"source" tar which works with make, make install.
 
-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

as far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain;
as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality. --albert einstein



Re: Hiring

2001-01-09 Thread Steve Mynott

David Hodgkinson [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

 Simon Wistow [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
 
  I think
 
 Ta,

How did he do then?

:-

-- 
1024/D9C69DF9 steve mynott [EMAIL PROTECTED]

microsoft: where do you want to go today?
linux: where do you want to go tomorrow?
bsd: are you guys coming or what?